High Court orders rice miller to clear entrance to aerodrome

first_imgAfter months of blocking the entrance to the Hampton Court Aerodrome, Essequibo rice miller Wazeer Hussein was on Monday last, through a High Court injunction, ordered to remove all materials that hinder a smooth passage to the facility.The interim injunction was given after the owner of the Aerodrome, Tamesh Jagmohan made an application for Hussein to refrain from blocking Parcel 440 Block XXXI at Plantation Hampton Court, Essequibo Coast. The injunction was granted by Justice Gino Persaud. The court document also stated that if Hussein fails to comply with the terms of the judgement, he will be in contempt of court and may be liable to imprisonment or have his assets confiscated. Hussain reportedlyThe debris being removed from the entrancehave until December 19 to clear the area.However, Guyana Times understands that the miller up to late Thursday afternoon was in the process of removing the debris which he used to block the entrance. When contacted, Jagmohan told this publication that the entrance was cleared thus making the aerodrome accessible.Hussein was arrested two Thursdays ago after he continued to block the entrance to the Hampton Court Aerodrome, on the Essequibo Coast. As recent as Saturday last, Social Protection Minister Amna Ally was forced to use the private entrance after Hussein refused to clear the entrance for the Minister to pass.She had promised to raise the issue with the Divisional Commander.About two week ago, Hussein was slapped with several charges including resistingThe entrance to the Hampton Court Aerodromearrest, threatening behaviour and obstructing officials of the Guyana Lands and Survey Commission (GL&SC) from carrying out their duties.Hussein is claiming ownership of the plot of land that is used to gain access to the aerodrome, but according to documents provided, the GL&SC had informed the businessman that the plot of land was owned by the State and as such, ordered that he give up possession of the reserve immediately.The notice also stated that failure to comply will result in legal action being brought against him by the Commission.It was reported that Hussein was being questioned in relation to the death of a baby. The infant was transferred from the Essequibo Coast to the Georgetown Public Hospital but on the day of transferal, the Hussein blocked the entrance to the aerodrome, thus causing a prolonged delay in the execution of the medevac.In addition, Guyana Times understands that Hussein would have made several comments on social media which is also being investigated by the Police.last_img read more

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Air Show looking for volunteers

first_imgThe Fort St. John International Air Show is looking for volunteers to help keep it flying high.The Air Show is looking for people from the region to join their board and to help run the show and keep it viable. Responsibilites of board members vary and could include such tasks as organizing hospitality services, securing sponsorships and marketing. A background in aviation is not neccessary.- Advertisement -The Air Show has been in existence since 1991 and alternates yearly with Dawson Creek as host. The show has included high profile acts such as the Canadian Forces Snowbirds and the National sky-jumping team, the Sky Hawks. Also included are numerous local aircraft and performers.Interested volunteers should contact Darlene Hamre who can be reached at 250-787-2925.last_img

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Injuries expose the youth of Bruins’ reserves

first_imgWith Collison out, freshman Russell Westbrook played a career-high 32 minutes. He went 1 for 11 from the field and scored four points. With Mata out, little-used sophomore center Ryan Wright saw playing time, and backup center Alfred Aboya played 26 minutes, equaling his second-most this season. “I want to play every game, but the best thing is to try and stay healthy for the near future,” Collison said. “I’m going to continue to do my rehab and treatment. I think the best thing was to stay out for this game.” Collison injured his shoulder in the second half Wednesday against No. 19 USC, but said he isn’t sure at what point. He tried to warm up Saturday but was scratched before the game. Mata said he awoke with a sore hip. It loosened during pregame warmups but tightened during the first half. Both players talked about heading to campus today to get treatment for their injuries, but neither knowing if they would be ready for the upcoming trip to Arizona State and Arizona. The absence of the two put pressure on UCLA’s youth. MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – UCLA starting center Lorenzo Mata limped toward the team bus, a heavy jacket on to combat the frigid temperatures and an ice bag taped to his left hip. Bruins starting point guard Darren Collison sported a similar ice bag on his left shoulder, then explained why he didn’t play in No. 2 UCLA’s 70-65 loss to West Virginia on Saturday. center_img “He came in at halftime and said, `I can’t play,”‘ UCLA coach Ben Howland said. “In the middle of second half he said, `I can play again.’ I just elected not to use him.” sophomore Mind your manners: West Virginia has a notoriously volatile crowd, led by the student section. During a mid- week game against rival Pittsburgh, the crowd taunted Panthers center Aaron Gray, chanting a term that is derogatory toward gay men. Eighty minutes before Saturday’s tipoff, Mountaineers coach John Beilein addressed the students. He told them the school has made positive strides in changing its reputation the past few years and asked them to represent the school in a positive fashion. When the Bruins took the court for layups prior to tipoff, there was a quick chant of “U-S-A, U-S-A,” an obvious reference to a UCLA team with four foreigners. Alfred Aboya and Luc Richard Mbah a Moute are from Cameroon, Ryan Wright is from Canada and Nikola Dragovic hails from Serbia. Making the rounds: Following the loss, Bruins athletic director Dan Guerrero led a four-person contingent to the University of Pittsburgh’s Peterson Center for a tour, then took in the No. 7 Panthers’ game against Providence as part of the discovery process for the renovation of Pauley Pavilion. Guerrero was joined by UCLA senior associate athletic director for external relations Ross Bjork, chairman of the Pauley renovation leadership committee Richard Bergman and his assistant, Joel Browning. The quartet already has visited the University of Texas, Wichita State, Kentucky (which has new practice facilities) and Ohio State. Also on the schedule are the University of Virginia’s new basketball arena, Maryland, Missouri and the headquarters of HOK Sport, which was selected to prepare preliminary designs to redo Pauley. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Mourinho to make his mark by selling two stars? Man United fans react

first_img There is a rumour claiming Daley Blind could be sold by Man United manager Jose Mourinho 1 Man United manager Jose Mourinho is set to make a mark in his job by selling popular duo Juan Mata and Daley Blind.That’s a rumour coming from Sky Sports and there was a mixture of reactions from fans to news of the possible double sale.Both Blind and Mata have been at the club since 2014, but it appears Mourinho believes the club would be better served by other players.Here, talkSPORT looks at some tweets from supporters discussing the futures of Blind and Mata…last_img

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Eleven Drake Relays Competitors Already Set To Represent the USA In Rio

first_imgThe Rio Olympic Games Preview events staged at the 2016 Drake Relays presented by Hy-Vee have truly lived up to their name. Eleven American athletes that competed in those events have earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic team as the U.S. Olympic Team Trials have reached the halfway point with a day of rest on July 5. Five more days of competition will follow as athletes vie for one of the coveted spots on Team USA for the upcoming Rio Olympic Games.Below are those athletes that have earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic team after using the 2016 Drake Relays presented by Hy-Vee as a springboard to the Olympic Trials.Clayton Murphy – men’s 800 metersBoris Berian – men’s 800 metersKate Grace – women’s 800 metersLaShawn Merritt – men’s 400 meters David Verburg – men’s 400 metersMarquis Dendy – men’s long jumpVashti Cunningham – women’s high jumpInika McPherson – women’s high jumpSam Kendricks – men’s pole vaultJanay DeLoach – women’s long jumpBrittney Reese – women’s long jumpOn July 4, Clayton Murphy and Boris Berian finished first and second, respectively, in the men’s 800 meters to match their finishes on the Blue Oval in April. A rough-and-tumble women’s 800 meters saw Kate Grace take top honors after she finished second in the 1,500 meters at the Relays. Ajee Wilson finished second at the trials to earn a place on the Olympic team. She was the Drake Relays presented by Hy-Vee women’s 800 meter champion in 2015. Two 400-meter runners that took one lap around the Blue Oval also qualified as LaShawn Merritt won his third-straight U.S. Olympic Trials in a blazing 43.97 to become the first man to run under 44 seconds this season. David Verburg captured the final spot on the team with a third-place finish in the event. In April. Merritt finished second on the Blue Oval while Verburg was fourth.A pair of athletes that took to the long jump runway together at Drake Stadium are also headed to Rio. Brittney Reese won the long jump at the Olympic trials with a U.S. Olympic Trials record jump of 23-11.75 (7.31m), the longest jump in the world since 2004 and the longest by an American since 1998. Janay DeLoach finished third in the event to join Reese in Rio. At the Drake Relays, Reese finished second in the event while DeLoach was sixth.The men’s long jump also produced an Olympic qualifier in Marquis Dendy. He finished fourth at the Trials, but the third-place finisher, Will Claye, did not hit the Olympic qualifying standard. Claye was also a 2016 Relays competitor, finishing fourth at Drake Stadium while Dendy was sixth.The women’s high jump also has a pair of new Olympians that competed at the Drake Relays. Vashti Cunningham used a second-place finish at her second professional meet at the Drake Relays to propel her to a second-place finish at the U.S. Olympic Trials. Inika McPherson, who has also been a Relays regular, finished third at the Trials to qualify for the U.S. Olympic team.Sam Kendricks also advanced to Rio in the men’s pole vault with a meet record clearance of 19-4.75 (5.91m). Kendricks was third at the Drake Relays and also finished second at the Capital Square Vault event.Those nine qualifiers will almost certainly be joined by more qualifiers later in the week in addition to the international Olympic athletes that competed in Rio Olympic Games Preview events at the 2016 Drake Relays presented by Hy-Vee.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Football Defeats Morehead State; Sets Up First-Place Battle at San Diego

first_img PDF Box Score Story Links Watch Live Next Game: Preview DES MOINES, IOWA – Led by a career-high 242 rushing yards and two touchdowns from Drew Lauer, the Drake University football team defeated Morehead State, 36-17, Saturday at Drake Stadium.Lauer’s 242-yard day was the first 200-yard performance by a Drake running back in more than three years and his long of 53 yards late in the fourth quarter set up the Bulldogs’ final score of the day to ice the game.Drake (4-3, 4-0 PFL) held a 303-74 yard advantage in rushing as the Bulldogs’ defense turned in another noteworthy performance. Danny Morales led the defense with 11 tackles and three passes defended while Will Warner hauled in two interceptions two go along with nine tackles. Those interceptions, combined with two fumble recoveries and a pick from Collin Seymour helped the Bulldogs to a plus-3 advantage in turnovers. Victor Jurgens and Will Kulick helped force those fumbles, one of which occurred inside the Bulldogs’ 5-yard line to end an MSU scoring threat. Morehead State (4-4, 2-2 PFL) was led by quarterback Mark Pappas who completed 28 of his 44 passes for 288 yards, but was sacked four times by the Bulldogs. Receiver Landon Hurst hauled in 11 of those passes for 123 yards and a touchdown.Holding a 15-10 lead at halftime, the Bulldog defense shined in the second half, allowing just one second-half score while giving the offense the ball back in MSU territory three times in the second half. Drake’s offense took advantage of those opportunities quickly late in the third quarter when following a fumble recovery on the MSU 39-yard line; quarterback Ian Corwin threw a 15-yard pass to Devin Cates to put the Bulldogs on top 22-10. Morehead State answered with a score early in the fourth quarter, but Drake scored on its next two drive with a pair of 70-plus yard drives that ended with Lauer and Cross Robinson finding the end zone to thwart any chance of an MSU comeback.The first half was much more trying for Bulldog fans as the Eagles took an early lead after an MSU interception resulted in a 70-yard Eagle drive that ended with DeAndre Clayton 5-yard touchdown. Drake countered on its next possession with a 41-yard field goal from Nathan De Bruin, his second make of the season, and followed that with a 13-yard Lauer score on the Bulldogs’ next possession. That touchdown capped a nine-play, 73-yard drive to open the second quarter. Just two minutes later, Drake found the end zone again as Mitch McFarlane hauled in a 25-yard Corwin pass to make the score 15-7. That drive was set up by Warner’s first interception of the day.Morehead closed the first half with a 41-yard field goal from Andrew Foster to send the teams into the locker room with Drake leading 15-10 before the Bulldogs pulled away for good in the second half.Drake’s fourth-straight win sets up a huge PFL clash next Saturday, Nov. 2, when the Bulldogs travel to San Diego. The potential league title hangs in the balance as both teams enter the contest on top of the PFL standings with matching 4-0 records in the league.  Live Stats 1350 ESPN Des Moines Stadium Full Schedule Roster Print Friendly Version at San Diego 11/2/2019 – 4 p.m. HTML Box Score last_img read more

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JOB VACANCY: DONEGAL COMPANY SEEKING TO RECRUIT TECHNICAL/ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT STAFF

first_imgA highly respected and reputable Donegal Company is seeking to recruit Technical/Administrative support staff to become part of their existing team for on-going & future projects. Applicants are required to possess strong IT skills and have a Third Level Qualification in either an IT and Business, Construction or Engineering related field.Duties to include but not restricted to; – Technical & Administrative Support– IT Support including Website Management & Development– Company Profile Enhancement incorporating Social Media Platforms– Procurement Process Development & Management In order to be successful, applicants must possess a full Driving License and their own transport is desirable.The position is based in Donegal Town and will require occasional travel nationwide (all associated transport costs will be covered by the company).Successful applicants must possess excellent communication skills and have a willing ability to work under pressure in a busy environment as part of an existing team.The vacancy may suit a recent Graduate.Salary negotiable based on relevant qualifications and experience. Initial 6-month contract with a view to a permanent position with the company.Please apply with CV to : staffvacancies2015@gmail.comDeadline for Applications: Friday 23rd January 1pmJOB VACANCY: DONEGAL COMPANY SEEKING TO RECRUIT TECHNICAL/ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT STAFF was last modified: January 14th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Administrative supportCVjobsnewsTechnical staffVacancylast_img read more

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EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: IS SUGAR EVIL?

first_imgBY EMMET RUSHE: In every movie, there is always a villain.It doesn’t matter whether it is a kids’ movie, a comedy, thriller or horror.There is always a ‘heel’; someone who we can push the blame onto; someone who, when they finally get their ‘comeuppance’ in the end, we can all sleep safe at night knowing that all is right with the world. Nutrition is no different.Over the past few decades we have always wanted a bad guy, someone who we can blame when things don’t go our way.This can be either with our weight, or with our diet.If we take a look back over the last 40 years or so, we can see a trend of blame that was attached to different food groups.Fat was the first culprit, then there was carbs, now we have sugar. The media is to blame for the majority of the scaremongering that goes on with nutritional ostracising.After all, they know a sensational headline when they see one, and they want to sell their story, so if they make the story completely over the top, people will buy it, share it and believe it.This is why there is so much misinformation regarding nutrition nowadays.Nowadays, we can add social media into this.We have not only lay-people sharing elaborate headlines, but nutritionists and trainers sharing and believing this information also.It seems that if it is on social media, it has to be taken as truth. If it comes in the form of a ‘meme’, then it is absolute gospel.But this simply is not the case.So;Is Sugar Evil?Simply put, No!Of course saying a blanket ‘No’ to that question is a simplistic as saying a blanket ‘Yes’ as an answer.When you are discussing nutrition, there isn’t ever a simple yes or no answer, because there is never a single scenario when it comes to the question. When we look at sugar as a culprit to weight gain, we cannot just point the finger and say, sugar is to blame.Sugar’s effect on your body composition will depend on whether you know how many calories you consume each day, how much protein, carbohydrates and fat you consume each day and if you meet these requirements.If the answer is yes and you are in a calorie deficit, then I can guarantee that weight loss will come.If you don’t know and you are just freestyling your diet, as in eating whatever you like with no knowledge of what amounts you are consuming, then how can you blame one specific food group?You cannot.This is not to say that sugar shouldn’t be restricted in your diet, for the majority of us it should.But this is because we eat a diet that consists of processed foods that are highly palatable, meaning they taste great because they have added sugars to them, (which don’t provide much satiety, meaning you don’t feel satisfied after eating them), which means you will eat more of them.So sugar is to blame for weight gain, yes.Again, no, it isn’t.When we look at the foods that are being consumed and that people tend to over eat, the top ten foods that came out on top were;Chocolate, ice cream, chips, pizza, cookies, crisps, cake, buttered popcorn, burgers, muffins.What do all these foods have in common?• They have large amounts of Carbs and Fat in them.• Which means they have a large amount of calories in them.• Which means if you eat large amounts of them, you will gain weight.So you simply cannot blame sugar for these foods being to blame for your weight gain.These foods are what people would claim to be addicted to, not simply sugar.Whenever someone has a craving for something sweet, they don’t sit down with a bowl of sugar to feed their ‘fix’, they go to these type of hyper palatable foods listed above.Foods with sugar and fat content, not just sugar.But what about sugar’s effect on our blood sugar?If we look at where sugar lands on the GI scale it has a GI of 68 per tablespoonful, this is actually classed as moderate.Sugar is 50% fructose and 50% glucose, the 50% fructose is why the effects on blood sugar is moderate instead of high.If we look at whole wheat bread on the GI scale, it actually has a higher level of 71 which is classed as high on the GI scale.A banana has a GI of 62 and honey, which is quite often touted as a better option for you than sugar, has a GI of 61 and the same glycaemic load as sugar of 12.This is the same on the Insulin index.We have been eating sugar for as long as we have been evolving. Our main source of this used to come from fruit in the form of fructose.So what is the take home message here?Sugar is not ‘toxic’ and we are able to process it just fine providing we are not over consuming it through highly processed foods or you have a food intolerance or an auto immune disease.Sugar is neither ‘good’ nor is it ‘bad’.It doesn’t provide satiety so you should be careful with the amounts you eat.If your diet is balanced and the majority of your food is unprocessed whole foods then some ‘junk’ foods won’t have much effect on your health overall.#TrainSmartFor more information on my New Parent Fitness Plan Class, contact me through the link below.https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Fitness/120518884715118?ref=hl* Emmet is the owner and operator of Rushe FitnessEMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: IS SUGAR EVIL? was last modified: September 13th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:emmet rusheEVILsugarlast_img read more

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More Laetoli Footprints Found

first_imgNew Discovery of More Laetoli Human FootprintsPrint characteristics support the conclusion they were made by modern humansby Jerry Bergman, PhDIn 1976, paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey reported finding what she judged to be ancient hominin footprints at a site in Laetoli, in northeastern Tanzania.[1] The footprints were in volcanic deposits dated to the Pliocene, an epoch Darwinians dated from 5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago. Evolutionists hypothesized that the footprints belonged to an extinct hominin species famously known as Lucy, i. e., Australopithecus afarensis.Additional footprints were reported in 2016 by a Tanzanian and Italian research team. These prints were about 150 meters away from the original footprint discovery. This new trackway is in one way more important than the Leakey finding because it is surrounded by hundreds of footprints belonging to what appear to be modern mammals and birds.[2] The hominin footprints on this trackway were made by two bipedal individuals walking on the same surface, at the same time, in the same direction(s) and, judging by the footprint traits, walked at the same moderate speed as those reported by Leakey.The first set discovered by Leakey were interpreted based on the assumption that a Lucy-like creature made the footprints based on an 80 ft.-long series of two footprint trails. The total of 69 prints (31 large and  38 smaller footprints) of what appear to be two adults and a child preserved in volcanic ash were found over 1,000 miles from the Lucy bones.[3] They were Darwin-dated at 3.7 million years old. In 1980, Tim White evaluated the prints, saying that theuneroded footprints show a total morphological pattern like that seen in modern humans. Heel strike is pronounced. The great toes appear fully adducted, lying immediately ahead of the ball of the foot. The medial longitudinal arch of the foot is well developed. Spatial relationships of the footprints are strikingly human in pattern … the Laetoli hominid trails at site G do not differ substantially from modern human trails made on a similar substrate.”[4]Another evidence that the prints are human is that humans move forward by use of their big toes, and “chimpanzees walk bipedally with curled lateral toes.”[5]  Walking upright is critical to prove evolution because humans are the only primate fully committed to walking upright as adults. A two-stage evolutionary process would require the baby crawling on all four limbs, but soon learning to walk upright once sufficient limb length and balance abilities are developed.As noted, the ash beds containing three parallel foot tracks were 1,000 miles away from Lucy and dated by some evolutionists to be close to a half million years older than Lucy. Nonetheless, paleoanthropologist Donald Johanson insisted, based on his acceptance at the time of the “single species hypothesis,” that these footprints must belong to Lucy, his famous discovery. According to him, the tracks “proved” that she walked upright as humans do today. The “single species hypothesis” has now been largely rejected, negating the main evidence for Lucy as a creature with human hands and feet.The feet of all arboreal apes show the great toe called a hallux that extends outward from the foot to create a hand structure for climbing trees. Thus, arboreal apes are said the have four hands, not two hands and two feet as do humans. The researchers concluded the “most obvious similarity of the Laetoli footprints to human footprints is the relativity marked adduction of the hallux,” meaning the big toe movement toward the midline of the body.[6] The arboreal ape foot structure was not present in any of the footprints, and is clear evidence that the prints were made by modern humans. Thus the Leakey prints, as far as can be determined from careful study, are close to identical to those of modern humans.If these are modern footprints, the researchers need to face major problems this creates for the evolutionary story. First, the dating of 3.6 to 3.8 million years old for human prints creates a dilemma for Darwin. It implies either that the Lucy-like footprints are not nearly that old, or that modern humans have been around for as long as 3.8 million years. If that were true, then most of the claimed ape-to-human links, including Australopithecus, could not be our ancestors, nor could any other claimed missing links (see 22 March 2010).Another problem with assuming that the Leakey footprints were made by Lucy is that the remains of at least 13 hominids were recently found in Laetoli in addition to numerous similar finds made as far back as the 1930s, raising the possibility that the prints are actually hominid.[7] The finds consist of human mandibles and teeth in relatively good condition dated at between 3.59 to 3.77 million Darwin-years old, which puts them in the range of the Laetoli footprints which they claim are 3.7 million Darwin years old. The dating estimates, at the least, indicates that the footprints and hominid fossils are contemporary.Yet another problem with interpreting the Leakey find as a Lucy type was the discovery of another set of footprints nearby made by feet so large that they would require a size-11, human shoe size. In other words, the shoe size of a six-foot-tall man, in contrast to Lucy, who was estimated to be between 3.5 and 4 feet tall. This set of prints was located only about 500 feet from the main set of tracks and was also claimed by evolutionists to be A. afarensis, the same species as Lucy. In short, both sets appear to be “like modern footprints,” Johansen said. “If one was left in the sand of a California beach today,” you could not distinguish them from modern human footprints.[8]Hands and Feet ComparisonsOther australopithecine skeletons did have hand bones that were used to determine Lucy’s hand and foot traits, but no hand or feet bones were located at the Leakey footprint site. Ironically, a decade after Lucy’s discovery, anatomist Charles Oxnard argued the australopithecine locomotion concern was irrelevant to any human evolutionary story because, he concluded, “the australopithecines … are now irrevocably removed from a place in the evolution of human bipedalism, possibly from a place in a group any closer to humans than to African apes and certainly from any place in the direct human lineage.” He added “this should make us wonder about the usual presentation of human evolution in introductory textbooks, in encyclopedias and in popular publications.”[9]Details of The New Footprint Set Found in 2016The two sets of footprints, the 1976 and 2016 sets, are evidence of the presence of at least five bipedal humans moving as a group through the Laetoli landscape. Both the new and the older footprints have provided scientists with clues in the search to understand human biological history. Fossil bones and teeth provide paleontologists with much information about various aspects of early humans. Conversely, footprints are snapshots of behavior in the past. Afterbeing impressed on the ground, these ephemeral traces of past life can fossilize only under extremely rare geological conditions. Using footprints, scientists can reconstruct locomotion, body size, speed, and variability of extinct creatures. Generally, fossil footprints are very useful paleontological tools. Their features can help identify their makers and also to infer biological information. Nearly all the fossil human tracks discovered so far have been referred to species of the genus Homo.[10]The authors of the 2016 find add: “Laetoli is the only exception to the record.” In contrast to this claim, as we have shown, according to the evidence, Laetoli is not an exception. All of the prints, including those at Laetoli, were of genus Homo. In 2019, Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin say that[One] of the most sensational results of the 2016 study that identified the second trackway at Laetoli concerns one track maker’s body size. One individual’s footprints are surprisingly larger than those of the other members of the group, suggesting an estimated stature of about 165cm, or about 5 feet 4 inches. This exceptional body size, which falls within the range of modern Homo sapiens maximum values.”[11]They add that this large size “makes it the largest Australopithecus afarensis individual identified so far.” In view of the observable evidence from both the first set of tracks found in 1976 and the 2016 discovery, the tracks are not “the largest Australopithecus afarensis individual identified so far.” Instead, rather, they were likely made by a modern 5’4’’ tall human, the height of the average woman today!The Locals’ Judgments about the PrintsThe children’s prints in the Laetoli beds are located on top of the adult prints. The children of the local people, the Maasi, have been observed to walk in the footprints of the adults. The footprints of concern were uncovered by removing the top soil which was later replaced to help prevent erosion. Interviews with local Maasai and others in nearby villages were completed to learn what the people who live in and around Laetoli believe about these footprints. The 35,000 residents in these villages have been living in the area for many generations.The Maasai people connect the Laetoli footprints to the Lakalanga tale, a hero who helped win a battle against a neighboring enemy. Lakalanga was so large that wherever he walked, he left visible tracks on the ground. The large body size of Lakalanga is also reflected in the local community’s human interpretations of the Laetoli footprints. Lakalanga was not a three- foot-tall chimp like Lucy but equal or larger to a modern man.No time reference was indicated by the story except it occurred deep in the Maasai past. There exist similar stories from other parts of the world where local people associate footprints with heroes. For example, in about 450 B.C., Herodotus reported footprints found along the banks of Tyras River in Moldavia that were associated with heroes visualized as giants. In addition, footprints from the Gallipoli Peninsula in north-eastern Turkey are linked with the great hero-athlete from the Trojan war.[12] The authors conclude,The discovery in 2016 of the second set of footprints – and particularly the large footprints in that set – offered further confirmation to the Maasai that the hero warrior Lakalanga really existed. Linking footprints with the story of Lakalanga is not unique at Laetoli.ConclusionThe scores of footprints at Laetoli found so far all appear to be made by modern humans, not Lucy or any other australopithecines. They lend no evidence to the evolutionary view of history, especially of humans. No doubt more and similar finds will be made in the future. They will shed even more light on the meaning and significance of human footprints, who made them and when they were made – questions we can only speculate about at the present time.References[1] Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin. 2019. The Maasai legend behind ancient hominin footprints in Tanzania. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/the-maasai-legend-behind-ancient-hominin-footprints-in-tanzania-119373. June 26.[2] Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin. 2019.[3]Fred Spoor, Bernard Wood, Frans Zonneveld. 1994. “Implications of Early Hominid Labyrinthine Morphology for Evolution of Human Bipedal Locomotion,” Nature 369 (June 23): 645–648.[4] White, Tim. 1980. Evolutionary implications of Pliocene hominid footprints. Science. 208(440): 175-176. p. 175.[5]Stern Jr, Jack and Randall L. Susman. 1983, The locomotor anatomy of Australopithecus afarensis. The American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 60(3): 279-317 , p. 309.[6] Stern and Susman, 1983, p. 309.[7] Leakey, Mary et al., 1976. Fossil hominids from the Laetoli beds. Nature. 262. pp. 460, 464.[8] Johanson, Donald and Maitland Edey. 1981. Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind. New York: Simon and Schuster; p. 250.[9]   Oxnard, Charles E. 1984. The Order of Man: A Biomathematical Anatomy of the Primates. New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 332.[10] Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin. 2019.[11] Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin. 2019.[12] Elgidius Ichumbaki and Marco Cherin. 2019.Dr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 839 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Infrastructure master plan ‘on track’

first_img24 February 2012 The Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission is making progress in drawing up South Africa’s infrastructure implementation master plan, which outlines the geographically-defined strategic projects announced earlier this month by President Jacob Zuma. The government is looking at spending R3.2-trillion in the next three years on over 40 major infrastructure projects. Cabinet spokesperson Jimmy Manyi told journalists on Thursday that the plan had been discussed during an ordinary Cabinet meeting in Cape Town this week.Geographically-defined strategic projects The geographically-defined strategic projects include a massive integrated rail, road and water infrastructure in Limpopo province, and improvement in the movement of goods between Durban, Free State and Gauteng. There are also moves to beef up the industrial and agricultural development and export capacity of the Eastern Cape and expand the province’s economic linkages with KwaZulu-Natal and the Northern Cape. In North West province, the plan highlights the need for the roll-out of water, roads, rail and electricity infrastructure, with 10 priority roads earmarked for upgrade. Improvements in the iron ore rail line between Sishen and Saldanha Bay in the Western Cape is expected to create a large number of jobs in the area.Rigorous feasibility assessments’ The National Treasury’s Budget Review for 2012/13, published on Wednesday, notes that not all of the R3.2-trillion projects under consideration will be approved for implementation. The government will choose the most cost-effective ones that offer optimal long-term benefits. “All public sector infrastructure projects will be subjected to rigorous assessment to determine their feasibility,” the Review states. The government is also of the view that the country’s public sector capacity to implement major projects is presently inadequate, and steps are being taken to strengthen planning and implementation capacity at all levels. In his Budget speech on Wednesday, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan outlined a range of measures to boost planning and monitoring capacity in government departments and municipalities to ensure that they carry out major projects and allocate the necessary spending on them in an efficient way. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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