Council of Economic Advisers: U.S. Coal Royalty Program a Drain on Taxpayers

first_imgCouncil of Economic Advisers: U.S. Coal Royalty Program a Drain on Taxpayers FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Patrick Rucker for Reuters:A U.S. program meant to encourage coal mining on federal land is open to industry abuse and costs taxpayers billions of dollars in lost revenue every year, a White House study to be released on Wednesday concluded.Roughly 40 percent of U.S. coal comes from federal land and taxpayers are being short changed on those sales due to lax oversight and permissive royalty rules, according to the report from the White House Council of Economic Advisors.“The program has been structured in a way that misaligns incentives going back decades,” according to the report.Officially, the U.S. Treasury is supposed to collect a 12.5 percent royalty on coal sold from surface mines on federal land, but the real share is closer to 5 percent due to loopholes and allowances, the report found.“Companies have employed several tactics to lower the selling price of coal without losing revenue,” it said.Among industry maneuvers the report highlighted: coal operators sell to sister companies at low prices or collect penalty payments from utilities that reject coal deliveries.The government is cut out of those payments, the report found, while reforms could yield an extra $3 billion a year.The federal coal program was once seen as an energy policy tool rather than a way to generate big revenues, former officials have said.But in an effort to curb climate change, U.S. President Barack Obama has used his time in office to promote renewable fuels and discourage the development of fossil fuels.Early this year, the Obama administration halted new coal-mine leasing while officials look to improve the program — another blow for a coal industry already shaken by competition from natural gas and weak demand from China.The Interior Department has said the coal lease freeze should persist for years, but that will be left to the new president elected on Nov. 8Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has vowed to renew coal industry jobs, while his presumptive Democratic rival Hillary Clinton has said she would support coal communities as the nation weans itself off fossil fuels.Whatever the environmental costs, Wednesday’s report shows that the federal coal program is a fiscal loser, said Brian Deese, an Obama adviser.“This is a hard look at the economics. And what we see is a program that, even before getting to the environmental considerations, is not serving the interest of taxpayers,” he said.White House economists say U.S. coal program costing taxpayersFull report from Council on Economic Adviserslast_img read more

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Kentucky Coal Producer Armstrong Energy Near Bankruptcy

first_imgKentucky Coal Producer Armstrong Energy Near Bankruptcy FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享SNL:With an Aug. 14 deadline looming to make an interest payment, Armstrong Energy Inc. released its second-quarter earnings with warnings to investors that it is likely to default on other debt and faces a real threat of bankruptcy.Armstrong reported a net loss of about $17.2 million for the second quarter, compared to a $15 million net loss in the same period last year and a $15.4 million net loss in the first quarter.The company’s financial position worsened on June 15, when it defaulted on the terms of the indenture governing its 11.75% senior secured notes due 2019 after failing to make the $11.75 million interest payment due on the notes.More: ($) Armstrong says it likely cannot meet debt obligations, posts Q2’17 net losslast_img read more

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A wind-tech boom in Texas

first_imgA wind-tech boom in Texas FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Houston Chronicle:Wind turbine service technicians will be in high demand from now until at least 2026, according to the government-funded Projections Managing Partnership that uses data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Between 2017 and 2019, the number of jobs to service wind turbines will increase 20.1 percent, the data shows. And by 2026, wind turbine service jobs will more than double.Wind and solar energy projects are also expected to be the fastest growing source of new generation over the next two years, according to a previous report by the Energy Department. Wind is projected to grow 12 percent in 2019 and 14 percent in 2020.Texas is the largest producer of wind energy in the U.S., generating about 18 percent of its electricity from wind, largely due to huge commercial-scale wind farms in West Texas. Texas has more than 20,000 megawatts of installed wind capacity, which could rise to 38,000 megawatts by 2030, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.More: The fastest growing job in Texas is wind turbine technician, data projectslast_img read more

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Trailhead Shorts: Energy Miles, Adventures, and Ride Across America

first_imgEnergy Mile TestingPhoto: Randall Holcombe Energy MilesHiking a mile uphill is as difficult as hiking 1.6 miles on flat ground, according to a new study performed by Western Carolina University.Must Do AdventuresWatch the Shredders The East Coast Surfing Championship in Virginia Beach is the longest-running surf contest in the country. Last year, they were treated with head-high surf thanks to Hurricane Danielle. August 24-28. surfecsc.com  Moonlight Hike August 13 is the full moon. Find a lonely peak and try a night hike sans headlamp, or head to Tallulah Gorge State Park and take a guided night hike deep into the gorge and across the 250-foot long suspension bridge that joins the 1,000-foot rock chasm. Forage for Fruit August is the end of blackberry season at high elevations. Check out the West Virginia Blackberry Festival in Clarksburg on August 4-6 for a blackberry baking contest. August 6 is also the annual Blackberry Harvest Festival at Hill Top Berry Farm and Winery in Virginia.Ride Across America, By the Numbers30: Number of years bikers have officially been racing across the United States. 3,000: Miles solo bikers and team relays pedal during RAAM, which is 30 percent longer than the Tour de France. 170,000: Distance the bikers climb as they travel across 12 states. 12: Days allotted to solo bikers to finish. 8 days, 8 hours, 6 minutes: Time it took Christopher Strasser, the solo category winner, to reach the finish line last year.Unbreakable DeterminationSleep deprivation, dehydration, and a fractured pelvis—three challenges that Katie Spotz faced during the Race Across America, a 3,000-mile, around-the-clock bike race from Oceanside, Ca. to Annapolis, Md. Spotz fractured her pelvis during a training ride days before the race. Instead of scrapping plans for the ride, Spotz switched vehicles from her road bike to a handcycle and completed the ride with teammate Sam Williams.last_img read more

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Race Day Dreams

first_imgIt’s happening again. I’m leading the race, feeling strong and confident. Suddenly the course takes an unexpected turn, into a building. This seems odd but I continue on, following the course markings up and down staircases, through narrow halls and dimly lit corridors. It’s a challenge to maintain my pace through the twists and turns but I continue to press onward, gradually realizing that not only have the course markings vanished, but that my competitors seem to have disappeared as well.I begin to panic, certain that I have taken a wrong turn and blown my lead. With relief, I spot some people up ahead – surely they can reassure me that I am still on course and will point me in the right direction. When I approach them, however, they seem to know nothing about the route – or even that a race is taking place. My urgent questions are met with blank stares so I continue to make my way through this building that is becoming more mazelike by the minute. My dream of a big victory has vanished along with the course itself and I find myself alone and lost.Eventually my heavy breathing wakes me and I realize this has all been a nightmare – a familiar one at that. Yes, it’s that time again. A big race is approaching and my unconscious fears are making themselves known. Talking with other runners, I realize that these dreams are not uncommon. Turns out many of us dream about getting lost, running into buildings, being in the port-a-john when the starting gun fires. How about the classic looking down and realizing that you are running barefoot – or worse yet, naked? Not generally a good thing unless you’re competing in a clothing-optional event.My guess is that these fears are related to classic performance anxiety. We all tend to question our preparedness before a big race, and in our dreams we are likely to blow things way out of proportion. Maybe in a way they help us to prepare for worst-case scenarios on race day. After all, whatever happens in this upcoming competition, I know it can’t be worse than my nightmares – and it’s not likely to involve any insane indoor running.Still, nightmares of any sort are no fun, so I try to figure out how to rid myself of these pre-race jitters. Positive imagery, self-affirmations, visualizing myself running strong and fast. All of that helps, but in the end, I think what I might need to do is practice some indoor running – up the stairs, through mysterious winding corridors, searching for hidden course markings and passing uncooperative spectators. That way, when this upcoming race takes an unexpected turn, I’ll be ready.last_img read more

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Are Energy Audits a Scam?

first_imgA home energy auditor inspects a hot water heater. Companies offering energy audits are generally reputable and legitimate and will help you both save money and reduce your carbon footprint if you follow their advice. Credit: USDADear EarthTalk: There are a number of companies out there now doing “energy audits” for the home, after which they try to sell you attic insulation and other products and services. Is this just a scam or would it be wise for me to look into this?— Bill Richards., New York, NYFor the most part, companies offering energy audits are reputable and legitimate and will help you both save money and reduce your carbon footprint if you follow their advice in regard to upgrading things like insulation, windows and appliances. “A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient,” reports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). “An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time.”“During the assessment, you can pinpoint where your house is losing energy,” adds DOE. “Energy assessments also determine the efficiency of your home’s heating and cooling systems [and] may also show you ways to conserve hot water and electricity.”You can conduct your own energy audit if you know where to look for air leaks (drafts), water waste and other key areas of a home’s inefficiencies. The DOE’s energysavers.gov website has guidelines to help homeowners conduct their own do-it-yourself home energy assessments. For instance, DOE recommends that homeowners make a list of obvious air leaks, such as through gaps along baseboards or at the edges of flooring and at wall and ceiling junctures. The potential energy savings from reducing drafts in a home can be as high as 30 percent per year, reports DOE. (The DOE website also provides information on other ways to save money and resources through less obvious things such as outdoor landscaping. It also posts guidelines for energy-efficient designing and remodeling.)You should also check the filters on heating and cooling equipment to see if they need to be changed so as to keep your furnace and air conditioners functioning at maximum efficiency. And if these or other appliances over 15 years old consider replacing them with newer models that meet federal EnergyStar efficiency criteria. Also, swapping out older incandescent bulbs in light fixtures with higher efficiency compact fluorescent or LED bulbs will save money and energy.A professional energy auditor with dedicated assessment tools and the knowledge of how to use them will in all likelihood carry out a more comprehensive assessment than you can do yourself. “Thorough assessments often use equipment such as blower doors, which measure the extent of leaks in the building envelope, and infrared cameras, which reveal hard-to-detect areas of air infiltration and missing insulation.”If you are concerned about enlisting a for-profit firm that upsells its own energy efficiency upgrade services based on a “free” energy audit, check with your utility to see whether it offers unbiased, independent energy audit services (which it may do for free or for a nominal cost). The assessor from your utility may be able to recommend window and door replacement companies, heating and cooling specialists and other vendors nearby that do reputable work to make your home is not only energy efficient but warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer.CONTACTS: DOE Energy Savers, www.energysavers.gov; EnergyStar, www.energystar.gov.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

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BREAKING: Subdivision Approved for Cumberland Island National Seashore

first_imgLast night, the Camden County Planning Commission voted to approve Lumar LLC’s Cumberland Island hardship variance. The island residents will now be free to subdivide the 87+ acre property (¼ mile from Sea Camp) that stretches from the river on one side of the Island to the ocean’s high tide on the other. The fact that the applicant failed to meet any of the hardship criteria was ignored. Concerns about the impact on the Island’s visitors and environment were ignored, despite the statement of the National Park Service Superintendent, Gary Ingram.Over 4,000 public comments opposing the subdivision were submitted to the board, including letters from The Georgia Conservancy, Wild Cumberland, the Sierra Club, and the Southern Environmental Law Center.Lumar LLC (a.k.a. the Island Residents Association) will now seek rezoning to allow for their planned development.There is still a chance to stop the development. Organizations and individuals have a 30-day window to appeal the planning board’s decision. Once that appeal is filed, the matter will go before the Camden County Commissioners.last_img read more

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Interior Sec. Zinke Recommends Shrinking a “Handful” of National Monuments

first_imgYesterday, Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke turned over his long-awaited recommendations regarding 27 national monuments that the administration put in its cross hairs for possible alterations back in April.While Zinke did not recommend that any of the monuments—all of which were designated by either Barrack Obama, Bill Clinton or George W. Bush—be completely rescinded, he did tell the Associated Press that he’d like to see some boundary adjustments (read shrinkage) and would prefer to loosen restrictions on extraction in a “handful” of the 27 national monuments.His statement was vague, however, as he declined to pinpoint which monuments he has targeted for boundary adjustments and decreased protections.According to the Washington Post, which spoke to multiple individuals briefed on the recommendations, Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante, as well as Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, will all be slated for size reductions if Zinke’s recommendations go into effect.More proposed border adjustments and decreased land protections could be announced in the coming days when Zinke’s report is made public.Since assuming the helm of the Department of the Interior, Ryan Zinke, a former Senator and Navy SEAL from Montana, has styled himself an advocate and proponent of public lands in the vein of Teddy Roosevelt, but his recent recommendations have conservationists worried that his tenure could ultimately compromise Roosevelt’s public lands legacy.“The recommendations within Secretary Ryan Zinke‘s National Monument Review could negatively impact key fish & wildlife habitat, reduce outdoor opportunities, and undermine the Antiquities Act that has enabled the long-term protection of millions of acres,” reads a statement released yesterday by Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, a conservation organization out of Missoula Montana.The Antiquities Act, which was signed into law by Roosevelt himself in 1906, affords presidents the legal authority to designate national monuments, but many argue that it does not give the executive branch the power to alter or rescind previous designations—as Trump and Zinke are now clearly attempting to do.“Any actions that would dismantle these natural wonders would violate Americans’ deep and abiding love for parks and public lands and fly in the face of 2.8 million Americans who expressed opposition to these changes,” said President of the Wilderness Society, Jamie Williams in a e posted to the organization’s website. “We and millions of other Americans stand by the belief that those lands should be preserved and handed down to future generations.  We urge President Trump to ignore these illegal and dangerous recommendations and instead act to preserve these beloved places.”For his part, Donald Trump has expressed disdain for the size and amount of national monuments declared by his previous three predecessors, calling the designations a “massive federal land grab” during an executive order signing at the Department of Interior back in April.“It’s time to end these abuses and return control to the people, the people of Utah, the people of all of the states, the people of the United States,” Trump went on to say.Stay tuned as we continue to cover this important and ongoing public lands issue.last_img read more

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Neko’s Comeback

first_imgHow did downhill biking phenom Neko Mulally rediscover his mountain biking mojo? He built a bike park.A torrential downpour is pounding Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia, and there’s talk of canceling the men’s U.S. Nationals downhill championship, in which case podiums will be awarded based on Saturday’s qualifying runs. This should be welcome news to Neko Mulally, who already took first in qualies.Mulally is ruminating on the possibilities. While a cancelation would make him national champ, shortcuts have never held much appeal to the 25-year-old pro. Deep down he wants another run.“He takes the long way round,” says friend and business partner Sean Leader. “He believes in hard work.”Mulally‘s penchant for work has compelled him to move mountains, or at least reshape them. In eastern Tennessee he and Lider have built their own downhill park and training facility, an epiphanic experience for the young athlete.“It changed my perspective,” Mulally said. “Getting on the podium isn’t the only thing that matters. There’s more to life than just winning the race. It taught me balance.”These days nothing surpasses the pleasure of pushing his boundaries in the company of his friends, a whole new crop of downhill competitors who are thriving thanks to Neko’s leadership.   When the announcement comes through that the national championship race will take place, albeit on a slippery track, Mullaly is stoked.The 25-year-old pro kits up and takes to the starting gate brimming with confidence.   “When you go into a race knowing you can win, it’s the best best feeling.”Alongside his little brother Logan Mulally, Neko began racing BMX at the tender age of six in their home state of Pennsylvania. Their father, an avid mountain biker, pushed them into BMX in order to build their skills early. When Neko was 13 he competed in his first downhill race at Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia.With pinpoint precision and hit-it-wide-open bravado, Mulally developed a reputation as one of the best youngsters in the East. Mulally crashed the party hard in 2014 when took fifth at a World Cup race in Australia and then followed it with a legendary run at the World Cup Finals in Norway. Within seconds of busting out of the starting gate, his chain broke and flopped onto the the dusty track.        “I rode on instinct,” Mulally said of his miraculous performance. “I was able to do stuff. I never practiced.”Mulally’s star began rising rapidly. He attracted sponsorships from Scott and Oskar Blues, earned $200,000, and bought a house in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina.In both 2015 and 2016, injuries plagued Mullaly, and he struggled to recapture the magic of his breakout season.“He was struggling,” said Logan Mulally. “It was a big mental game. He just didn’t know how he could get back on top.”     In the winter of 2016, discontented and restless, Mullaly approached his friend and fellow racer Sean Lider about building a downhill course. Mulally hoped that such a project would reinvigorate his career and rekindle his fire.Furthermore, both riders wanted to see a downhill renaissance in the Southeast. In a region where mountain biking had exploded in recent years, downhill riding has been conspicuously underplayed.“The first year was just Neko and myself busting ass,” said Leader.The duo sculpted trail inspired by the downhill courses they had competed on around the world. “Windrock is unique because we have the freedom to develop this place however we want,” says Lider.The gnarly, steep terrain immediately attracted a following of dedicated competitors, World Cup stars like Walker Shaw, Dakota Norton, and Max Morgan.“It gives me a place to train that is similar to the conditions we ride in Europe,” says Norton. “From the rider’s perspective it is everything we could ask for. I’ve built my entire career at that bike park and on that mountain.”Rivalries and friendships abound as the Windrock has become a hamlet of downhill athletes. In the off-season, a slew of trailers arrive at Leader’s, where a nonstop routine of pumptrack riding, motocross, and downhilling begins.“Three of the top 30 in the world practice at my place,” said Mulally. “They train on my mountain. I am happy about that.”Logan Mulally says his big brother warmly embraces the extra competition that comes with the scene he’s cultivating.“It’s brought all the riders up a level,” Logan said. “He’s bringing his friends with him. He’d rather see one of those guys win than some European.”Aside from a training ground, Windrock is open to the public and also home to a Southeast Downhill Series and the Windrock Enduro. When Neko isn’t training he’ll jump into one of their old trucks and run shuttles. Embracing the bike park’s everyday chores and sharing in the stoke is a big part of Neko’s new-found zen, says Lider.“He comes up here on his day off all the time. He likes just seeing the scene. He’s here because he loves it.”   Mulally and Leader say a growing number of novices and young riders now frequent the mountain, especially as they develop more trails. In Windrock downhill has taken hold.“The younger kids who come are pretty good riders,” says Neko. “It’s cool to see they are products of our scene.”As the starting gate buzzes, clicks, and parts open, Mulally smoothly glides out. He picks and flows his way down the chundery track, riding a razor’s edge of calculation and euphoric abandon.“It was the Neko we’d seen in 2014: calm, relaxed, having a good time with his friends,” says Logan Mulally of that national championship run.Mulally crosses the line with a time of 3:11:121, winning by only a half-second. Climbing the podium, the national champion is all smiles.“He’s back with that desire,” said Norton. “This whole process of building this bike park has given him a sense of clarity about what he wants.”“I am proud of all the guys that ride at our spot,” says Mulally. “We all ride together all the time. Sometimes I win. Sometimes they win. We do that all winter long.”last_img read more

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The Super Plunge

first_imgPolar Plunges are too chill for these cold-hearted Do-gooders who wade into the frigid Chesapeake 24 times in 24 hours.There are polar bear plunges, and then there is the Super Plunge. For the last 14 years, dozens of participants have shown up to plunge into the frigid waters of the Chesapeake Bay 24 times in 24 hours to raise money for Special Olympics Maryland.“I wasn’t too sure about it at first because I was like, 24 times?” said Adam Hays, a Special Olympics Maryland athlete.Throughout the year, Hays competes in cycling, soccer, alpine skiing, basketball, and swimming. He started going to the Maryland State Police Super Plunge as a member of the athlete media team, cheering on the participants and raising awareness for the cause.After two years of watching from the sidelines, he decided to sign up himself. Hays has now completed the Super Plunge every year since 2005.“As an athlete, this is pretty cool, because I’m part of a team that is helping raise money for my fellow athletes from all over Maryland, knowing that even though I freeze, we all freeze as one,” he said.Hays said he returns every year for the camaraderie among the small,  tight-knit group of Super Plungers, the challenge of the event, and “the power of inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities.”Every hour for 24 hours, the Super Plungers race down the beaches of Sandy Point State Park into the Chesapeake Bay. Nonstop food and entertainment helps everyone stay awake as darkness falls and ice begins to form in the water.“My fellow athletes and I, there are like six or seven of us, and we’re leading the charge out into the water. Then everybody’s running in right after us,” Hays said. “That first one is pretty darn cold. As you keep doing it for those 24 hours, you get used to it… I usually go up to my shoulders. There are some other really dedicated ones that go all the way under.”The Super Plunge is one of five plunges Special Olympics Maryland puts on over the course of a week every January. For the other events, organizers ask participants to raise at least $75 to enter. To take part in the Super Plunge, participants commit to raising $10,000. There are typically 25 to 35 Super Plungers in comparison to the thousands of people who show up for the other events.Donny Boyd has been plunging for 13 years, raising more than $250,000 for the Maryland athletes. One of his best friends, whose son is autistic, first introduced him to the event.“I had absolutely no idea what was going on, but it sounded exciting,” Boyd said. “I’ve been a firefighter for 30 years, so not a whole lot intimidates me. But this was certainly a challenge.”He did the regular plunge for two years before tackling the Super Plunge.“Once you do the Super Plunge, you can’t go back,” Boyd said. “There’s so much excitement in that tent for 24 hours, you can’t describe it.”Boyd has carried that excitement with him the last ten years as team captain for the Super Plunge, rallying others as they work towards their fundraising goals. He also sits on the board for Special Olympics Maryland.This year, two of Boyd’s daughters will be joining him for the marathon event, carrying on the tradition of plunging for a cause.“They have gotten to know a lot of athletes by name, it’s personal now,” he said. “How many people have the opportunity to do something at a higher level like this and be so involved and make a difference?”Over the years, the Polar Bear Plunge has become a defining fundraiser for Special Olympics across the United States. Jim Schmutz, the CEO of Special Olympics Maryland, said they hope to raise $2.5 million this year, translating to around 35 percent of their annual budget.But the event is about more than the money raised.“It’s an opportunity for us to help people better understand the breadth and depth of our program,” Schmutz said. “We have 7,782 athletes and they’re participating year-round in 27 different sports. We’re not just a one time event.”Plunges are far from a new phenomenon. The Coney Island Polar Bear Club, founded in 1903, claims to be the oldest winter bathing club in the United States. Members take a dip in the cold New York waters every Sunday afternoon from November to April.In other places like Canada, Russia, and Scandinavia, plunges are historically held to celebrate New Year’s Day. People alternate between the freezing temperatures of the water and hot saunas as a way to boost their health. Although researchers have not found a link between this practice and improved physical conditions, there are some who believe the shock from the cold temperatures and the rush of adrenaline is a great way to start off a new year.At Scott Base research center in Antarctica, an annual polar plunge is a tradition dating back decades, It’s so extreme that participants wear a harness as they jump into a hole cut in the ice.For anyone planning to do a plunge for the first time, Boyd recommends wearing as few clothes as possible.“As soon as you get out, you can dry off, put your dry sweats on, and start your warming process,” he said. “A lot of people will jump in with the full sweat clothes on and it’s just miserable because you can’t get them off. It intensifies the cold.”And don’t forget your shoes.“Your feet are more sensitive than you know,” Boyd said. “If you go into the water without something covering your feet, it’s going to be like pins and needles.”Other Plunges Near YouRegistration is now open for the fifth annual Shiver in the River taking place on February 23, 2019. Participants can join a community clean up, run or walk a 5K, jump into the James River—or do all 3. Shiver in the River is a fundraising event for Keep Virginia Beautiful. Funds raised help increase programs that support litter prevention, community outreach, education, recycling and beautification for Richmond and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Participants that register before the end of the year save on 5K registration and have a chance to win a VIP package.Here are other polar plunges across the region: Maryland State Police Polar PlungeJanuary 18, 2019 (Super Plunge)Sandy Point State Park, MD.January 24-26, 2019Sandy Point State Park, MD.Virginia Beach PlungeFebruary 1-2, 2019Virginia Beach, Va.Hilton Oceanfront HotelWinter Games PlungeFebruary 2, 2019Hollidaysburg, Pa.Canoe Creek State ParkPolar PlungeFebruary 23, 2019Acworth, Ga. Acworth Beach at Cauble ParkDolphin DipJanuary 1, 2019Surf City, N.C. Roland Ave. Beach AccessMorgantown Polar PlungeFebruary 23, 2019Morgantown, W. Va.Cheat Lakelast_img read more

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