RFU at a crossroads, according to high court judge

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 12: TheEngland team line up for the national anthems prior to kickoff during the RBS 6 Nations Championship match between England and Italy at Twickenham Stadium on February 12, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) “Since it became public knowledge that I was considering resignation I have been overwhelmed by messages of support from all levels of rugby. Literally hundreds of people have urged me not to resign but to remain within the Council to help to improve the governance of the Union. The Council and the wider rugby community is full of very good people whom I do not want to let down. I would like to thank everyone who has been in touch and promise to do all I can to repay the faith they have shown in me.“I believe Council and the RFU are now at a very important crossroads. Council has reaffirmed its confidence in the Board and must therefore also accept its responsibility to ensure that the Board address the issues highlighted in the report. The Acting Chairman of the Board [Paul Murphy] has given me his assurances that this will happen. I believe I can better assist this process by remaining as a member of Council from where I can play an active role in holding the Board and Acting CEO to their commitments to improve governance and restore confidentiality. I have already started that process and am in regular dialogue with the President [Willie Wildash] and Acting Chairman to ensure that we do exercise close scrutiny over the affairs of the Union and provide the necessary checks and balances. All of us on Council must now start to rebuild relationships, put personal animosities aside and restore good governance to this Union.” Judge Jeff Blackett, the Rugby Football Union’s Disciplinary Officer has been forced into making a public statement after the farce of the last 10 days when the Union’s good name was dragged through the mud.Blackett was considering resigning, but has decided to continue in his role for the reasons he has laid out below.“I have spent the last week considering my future as Honorary Disciplinary Officer of the RFU. I have decided not to resign and, given the amount of media interest, I thought it important that I explain why,” he said.“When I was appointed as a judge in 2004 I swore an oath before the Lord Chancellor “to do right to all manner of people after the laws and usages of this Realm without fear or favour affectation or ill will.” I believe that this oath also applies to my role as Honorary RFU Disciplinary Officer where I have always tried to act independently and impartially. Whenever I undertake an investigation or disciplinary proceedings for the RFU I approach the task with the same diligence as if it were part of my professional life as a judge. Sometimes that leads to uncomfortable decisions, but those decisions are made impartially, honestly and publicly.“On 10 June the RFU Council asked me to investigate the recruitment process for the last CEO and the performance director role, the reasons for the Board’s loss of confidence in the CEO, how confidential material was leaked into the public domain and what lessons could be learned for the future. Council subsequently approved Terms of Reference and I brought together a panel of people with appropriate skills and independence of mind. We worked very hard against a challenging timetable to produce a report to inform the RFU Council’s debate on 10 July. The members of the panel are all men of immense integrity and experience and they have given up many hours of their time, for no reward, with nothing to gain but the satisfaction of knowing they were helping the game they love. All members of the panel worked tirelessly, listening to and reading evidence, sifting through it and reaching conclusions. We were unanimous in our assessment of what happened, what went wrong and what was necessary to rectify the problems we discovered and we are satisfied that we have produced a robust, evidence-based report. We hoped that Council would accept the report and discuss the recommendations. “The report contains some criticism of the former Chairman of the RFU, the Board and some of the governance of the Union. We were particularly very disappointed about the amount of leaking of confidential information which caused significant reputational damage to the Union. The recommendations were designed to restore confidence in the Union, to begin to rebuild its tarnished reputation and to start a process to improve our governance.“Council received the report and, following extensive debate, they decided not to implement all of our recommendations and left those relating to governance on the table for further discussion. They also voted after debate not to publish the report. Whether or not the report is published is now a matter for them and not me because they have taken ownership of it. My panel and I were disappointed by Council’s decisions and I indicated that I would have to consider my position.“During the discussion the issue which caused me the most distress personally concerned a threat of legal proceedings against my panel for defamation if the report is published, which was served during the debate in Council. Any such proceedings would not succeed but I felt that their, and my, integrity was being impugned. This whole episode has impacted on me personally much more than I expected. This, together with the amount of media attention, caused me to question whether I was causing damage to the RFU and to myself and my family by remaining as the Disciplinary Officer.last_img read more

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Daily news from New Zealand – 7 September – Video

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 06: The Cloud Party Central on Aucklands waterfront ahead of the Rugby World Cup on September 6, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Cloud on Aucklands waterfrontThe Rugby World Cup 2011 official YouTube channel will be releasing daily videos to give you the chance to be part of the experience no matter where you are in the world. It allows you to follow the progress of the tournament, plus look at the other ways in which the tournament will affect the nation.Today they take a closer look at Tri-Nation’ holders Australia to see their team progress with the tournament less than 3 days away.If you are lucky enough to be in town for the tournament, visit The Cloud in Queen’s Town, Auckland, will be showcasing the business prospects New Zealand has to offer. There will food and beverage stalls to highlight their nations culinary talent. Not to worry though, there is also a big screen inside the venue to accommodate those fans that missed out on tickets. Enjoy… read more

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RBS 6 Nations: Round One Talking Points

first_imgIs the idea of a snaffling seven now just a romantic notion or will the other nations miss a turnover maestro? Either way it will be interesting to see how the breakdown battle plays out during the championship. NOT FOR FEATURED Trend setters: captains Chis Robshaw, Sam Warburton, Jamie Heaslip and Kelly Brown are all back-rowers By Sarah MockfordFresh facesA new Six Nations is about to get underway and there are plenty of new faces to catch the eye too. Billy Twelvetrees, while a big unit himself, should add more finesse to England’s recent bish-bash midfield. His tactical awareness is sure to help Owen Farrell at ten and he has the boot to keep the Scots pinned back in their own territory.Danger man: Craig Gilroy wins his second capThe Scots have a new addition themselves – Sean Maitland the latest Kiwi to swap fern for thistle. Alongside Stuart Hogg and Tim Visser, Maitland forms the most dangerous-looking back three Scotland have fielded in a long while. It’s down to their big pack to give them the necessary ball.Andrew Coombs is not such a starry debutant but he has a significant, if not so glamorous, job to do. The Dragon may have been down the pecking order of Wales locks but now he’s got his chance he must use his strength to give Adam Jones & Co the necessary support to hold their own against an impressive Irish front row.The man in green to watch is Craig Gilroy. He danced and darted around Argentina on debut last November in a manner reminiscent of Shane Williams, but can he bring a spark to Ireland’s attacking game in Cardiff? And how will his defence hold up against the giants of the Wales back-line?Coaches’ cornerThe coaches this year offer almost as many intriguing subplots as the players. There’s Rob Howley, who’s now able to put his own mark on Wales after a far from perfect job-share arrangement with Warren Gatland during the autumn.Head man: England’s Stuart LancasterScott Johnson and Dean Ryan have free rein in Scotland with expectations low and only interim contracts on the table. New coaches can often fire a spike in performance, though Scotland could do with more than a spike after that awful display against Tonga. In stark contrast, Declan Kidney is playing it safe and steady in terms of Ireland selection – hardly a shock when his contract is up this summer. Jacques Brunel’s time in the France coaching team under Bernard Laporte will give him a huge insight into Freddie Michalak ahead of the continental showdown between France and Italy on Sunday, while Philippe Saint-Andre is trying to nail a hard streak onto the traditionally flaky French.Then there’s Stuart Lancaster. This time last year he was interim head coach and given little chance of getting the position full-time. Twelve months on and not only is he head coach, but he’s just been given the role of overseeing the performance of all England’s international teams. He’s gone from waiting in the wings to the star act.Perhaps the most important coach of all, however, is one who isn’t even in charge of a team. Gatland will be casting a beady eye over all the home nations as he prepares to compile a Lions squad able to beat Australia – chuck the Wallabies on the barbie so to speak.King of the steals: Wallaby David PocockSuper sevensOn the subject of Lions, Gatland has spoken openly about the need for an out-and-out seven Down Under, but interestingly only one home nation is playing a true openside this weekend. Wales captain Sam Warburton loves the physical contest at the breakdown, hunting the ball as if it was one of his cherished bars of Fruit & Nut, but the other sevens are more sixes.Chris Robshaw and Kelly Brown are real grafters, and Sean O’Brien is Ireland’s battering ram, but none of them would be considered scavengers in the mould of Wallabies David Pocock and Michael Hooper. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Lions 2013: Should the Lions tour France?

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A trip to Clermont is the final Lions midweek match before the second Test at the Stade Velodrome in Marseille. The series ends with the third and final Test at the fabled Parc des Princes.What a tour that would be, not just for the players but also the fans. Ask anyone who was in France for the 2007 World Cup and they will tell you – the French know how to lay on a good spread. The wine, the cheese, the sun – and not a whinging Aussie in sight. Anticlimax: Sean O’Brien in action for the Lions, who scored ten unanswered tries v Combined CountryBy Gavin Mortimer EVEN THE biggest, fiercest, proudest Lions supporter would find it hard to dispute that so far the 2013 tour has been a let-down. Not quite a farce but verging on one. Nearly three weeks in and four matches gone and the sense of anti-climax is overwhelming. Apart from the cracking contest against the Queensland Reds, the Lions haven’t been seriously tested in their other three matches.This could all change when the Test series starts on Saturday week, but no Lions tour in recent memory has got off to such a ponderous start. Pity the players, so desperate to impress in the battle for a place in the Test side, and spare a thought for Warren Gatland, tasked with selecting his best XV in a series of warm-up matches that wouldn’t stretch a touring pub team. No wonder he declared recently that “the tour is probably two matches too short for us and you would like a couple more warm-up matches going into that first Test”.Gatland isn’t the only ex-hooker muttering at the way things have turned out on this tour. Brian Moore, who toured Australia with the 1989 Lions, has been outspoken in his criticism of Australia’s attitude towards their visitors. Having already renamed Western Force ‘Western Farce’, the former England hooker used his column in this week’s Telegraph to propose a radical restructuring of future Lions tours Down Under – that is if Australia continue to field weakened provincial sides in the lead up to the Test series. What Moore proposes is that the ARU “should allow the three Pacific Island nations to play the Lions on Australian soil”. Not only would it be “commercially viable”, writes Moore, it would also be a shot in the arm for Fijian, Samoan and Tongan rugby.It’s a bold and worthy idea, one the Lions should consider. And while they’re at it, here’s another proposition: why don’t the Lions tour France? The Lions have played before in France, in October 1989, in a match to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution that ended 29-27 to the visitors. But why not base an entire tour in France?France didn’t have a rugby infrastructure in the amateur era to accommodate such a tour, but club rugby across the Channel has undergone a revolution in the past decade and the Top 14 is now the richest and most powerful league in the world game with so many overseas stars that even if the French coach pulled his 30 best homegrown players from tour matches, the Lions would still be challenged in every game.center_img Let’s imagine for a moment the 2013 Lions are now in France and not Australia. They would have kicked off their tour with a match against the French Barbarians, a team containing a sprinkling of promising Gallic talent and a few old heads such as Lionel Nallet, Julien Dupuy and Yannick Jauzion.Then it would have been off to Biarritz, Basque country, to play a side containing the likes of Imanol Harinordoquy and Dimitri Yachvili. The following Saturday it’s Toulouse at the Stade Municipal, a seething cauldron filled with 35,000 souls all screaming for the Lions’ blood while cheering on Clement Poitrenaud, William Servat and Luke McAlister.Survive that experience and the Lions head to a midweek encounter against France A in Montpellier before moving along the Mediterranean coast to face Jonny, Bakkies and the rest of their pals in Toulon.The Tuesday sees the Lions run out against Racing Metro at the their 32,000-seater stadium just west of Paris, the final chance for Warren Gatland to run the rule over his squad, before the first Test the following Saturday at the Stade de France.last_img read more

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The one knee acceleration

first_imgLacrosse ball shoulder release IT’S GETTING to the end of the season, so it’s normal for your body to be feeling a bit battered, writes John Dams, Harlequins’ head of performance. The one knee acceleration exercises will enable you to work your lower limbs without putting them under too much stress, and the lacrosse ball shoulder release will help you ease your aches and pains. Watch how the pros do it below, and then give it a go!One knee acceleration LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

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RBS Six Nations: France 21-31 England

first_img 13 years of hurt: England finally celebrate the Grand Slam in Paris TAGS: Highlight France carried further, with 508 metres run compared to 378 by EnglandFrance made 109 tackles to England’s 115. England missed 25 tackles and France 19.Scott Spedding carried furthers with 129m run, followed closely by Virimi Vakatawa with 128m. England’s best was Mike Brown with 93.James Haskell topped the tackle count for England with 15, followed closely by George Kruis and Owen Farrell with 13. Loann Goujon (11) and  Bernard Le Roux (10) topped the French tackle countEyes on the prize: Anthony Watson scores his 11th, an most important try, for EnglandFrance: Scott Spedding, Wesley Fofana, Gael Fickou, Maxime Mermoz (Maxime Medard, 69), Virimi Vakatawa, Francois Trinh-Duc (Jules Plisson, 13), Maxime Machenaud (Sebastien Bezy, 75); Jefferson Poirot (Uini Atonio, 57), Guilhem Guirado (c) (Camille Chat, 66), Rabah Slimani (Xavier Chiocci, 57), Alexandre Flanquart (Paul Jedrasiak, 57), Yoann Maestri, Damien Chouly, Bernard Le Roux, Loann Goujon (Wenceslas Lauret, 69)England: Mike Brown, Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph, Owen Farrell, Jack Nowell, George Ford, Danny Care (Ben Youngs 43); Mako Vunipola (Joe Marler, 40), Dylan Hartley (c) Luke Cowan-Dickie, 67) Dan Cole, Maro Itoje, George Kruis, Chris Robshaw (Jack Clifford, 75), James Haskell, Billy VunipolaUnused reps: Kieran Brookes, Joe Launchbury, Manu Tuilagi, Elliot DalyFrancePens: Mahenaud (7)England: Tries: Danny Care, Dan Cole, Anthony WatsonPens: Farrell (6)Cons: Farrell (2)Yellow card: Xavier ChiocciReferee: Nigel Owens (Wales) England won their first Grand Slam in 13 years as they outmuscled and outscored an obdurate French side who put in their best performance of the Championship LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England won their first Grand Slam in 13 years in a raucous atmosphere at the Stade de France. In a game where England could never quite relax, it was not until Owen Farrell’s 72nd and 78th minute penalties that they were able to breathe a little easier. England had doused French fires early on with a controlled, opportunistic opening 20 minutes. After just 11 minutes Danny Care darted over the line from distance, and 10 minutes later, after some multiple phases deep in the French half, Dan Cole used his 19st frame to power over from close range, with a whiff of obstruction waved away by Nigel Owens.Over she goes: Big Dan Cole barrels over for England’s second tryWith Maxime Machenaud doing a passable impression of a dead-eye kicker for France, they were only 17-12 down at the break. In the second-half, England gave away a succession of penalties as France continued to keep within a converted score, even though Anthony Watson crossed for England’s third try after 57 minutes. Hartley left on a stretcher in the game’s final quarter after an accidental knee in the head, but even though France continued to prod, and probe, England were to dig in, show heart and expunge some of the hurt from the World Cup, only five months ago. It was a night every squad member will remember for quite some time.WHAT’S HOT…Selection. Selection. SelectionEddie Jones is paid the big bucks to make the big decisions and he made a decisive choice by switching scrum-halves for the Grand Slam encounter. His choice was vindicated after 11 minutes when Care showed his vision and speed to sprint in from 40 metres, after England had shown some early nerves. In the second-half, it was Youngs who came on to make the difference, as he put a delicious grubber in behind the French defence for Watson to score. Jones had after all, joked that he would come on to win the Grand Slam. Prophetic.Pure joy: Danny Care scampers over for the first try of the gameFrance find a kickerFrance have had a succession of kickers whom never exuded much confidence; namely Camille Lopez, Freddie Michalak, Remi Tales and latterly Jules Plisson. However, in Maxime Machenaud, they appear to have found a consistent kicker, in the mould of Morgan Parra and Dimitri Yachvili, two of the better French kickers of the last decade. The Racing Metro No 9 kicked seven penalties out of seven to keep the pressure on England. Bravo, Maxime!Everybody needs a Billy Vunipola dump truck in their teamBilly Vunipola has carried England, literally, all tournament, as well as a fair few opposition defenders. Eddie Jones has managed him well since becoming coach, showering him with praise, and the big Saracen has responded with a series of powerful performances. Against France, his muscular carries were instrumental to England getting front-foot ball – he carried second furthest for England with 70m – and his burst up the guts of the French defence led to Watson’s try. Another huge hit on Goujon in the first-half showed his defensive prowess. A surety to be battling it out with Taulupe Faletau for the Lions shirt next summer. Magnnificent.Go forward: Billy Vunipola was at his imperious best against FranceEngland supportThey have gone through the difficult transition from witnessing World Cup heartache to triumphant champs in the last five months, but England’s support never wavered. From the invasion by train, plane and car, the streets of St-Germain-des-Pres were awash with England fans dressed as knights, bowmen, warlocks and anything else medieval. It was all in good humour and Swing Low was heard loudly around Paris’ most fashionable quarter…and that was hours before the secured the Grand Slam. There will be a few sore heads in the morning but they will not care a jot.Backing their boys; England’s support was superb on a night of celebration in ParisWHAT’S NOT…France, improved, but still a blunt weapon in attackLes Bleus had a number of exciting runnners, with Scott Spedding and Virimi Vakatawa making a number of searing breaks from deep but when they got into the England half, they didn’t have the composure to make an unusualy frayed England defence pay. Guy Noves has said this first tournament is something of an experiment, but another fourth placed finish is not good enough for a country with their playing resources.England penalty countEddie Jones would have been pulling whatever hair he has left out after 50 minutes, with England’s discipline leaving a lot to be desired. Hartley, Itoje and Nowell were just a few to be pinged for various transgressions. That they conceded nearly twice as many penalties as France was telling, giving away 14 penalties to France’s eight. Against a better side, England could have been punished.STATISTICSEngland had the better of the possession with 60 per cent compared to France’s 40 per cent. Man of the Match:For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgRyan’s rant Worcester boss Dean Ryan effectively sent his own team to our Sinners bench this weekend by blasting them in his post-match TV interview, following their 54-35 home defeat by Wasps.“I just think our first 40 minutes was unacceptable,” said the furious head coach. “The integrity of the league and the integrity of this club are really important to me so I am not going to dance around about the tries we scored in the second half, because this game should be a contest.” Ouch. Dancing with delight: Kenya celebrate their victory in Singapore. (Photo: Getty Images)Kenya win one? Yes we Ken! Kenya’s Sevens players became national heroes this weekend as they won the Cup at the Singapore Sevens – their first Cup triumph in their 114th HSBC World Sevens Series tournament.Ranked eighth in the world, Kenya reached the final when Collins Injera kicked a 40-metre penalty late on in their semi-final clash with Argentina, to break the 12-12 deadlock.They then met series leaders and form team Fiji in the final and raced into a 20-0 lead with tries from Oscar Ayodi, Injera (two) and Samuel Oliech. After the break Fiji hit back with one try, but Nelson Oyoo crossed to extend Kenya’s lead and Frank Wanyama put the icing on the cake at the death.Injera is now within two tries of Argentina’s Santiago Gomez Cora at the top of the all-time try scoring charts. He was also named Player of the Final in Singapore.England’s James Rodwell reached a notable landmark at the weekend as he set a new record of playing in 69 consecutive tournaments in the HSBC Series. Happy HeriotsReplacement hooker Neil Cochrane scored two tries from driving mauls to help Heriots win the BT Cup. They beat Melrose 21-13 in the final at Murrayfield and full-back John Semple, who kicked 11 points, was named Man of the Match. Tribute: Applause for Martin Roberts at Kingsholm, including from young Alfie (the taller child). (Photo: Getty Images)Tribute to DadPraise is due to a very brave boy, Alfie Roberts, who walked out onto the pitch as a mascot before Gloucester’s match against Exeter, just six days after his dad, former Gloucester centre Martin Roberts, had died suddenly at the age of 48.Alfie helped the club pay tribute to the man known as “Speedy” by accompanying Billy Twelvetrees onto the pitch and joining in the minute’s applause before kick-off. He had done the same for a midweek game at Chosen Hill rugby club, just a few days after losing his dad, because they were the club Martin coached. The SinnersGenerous GreigLondon Irish lost their relegation showdown against Newcastle Falcons 13-6 and among the players having nightmares afterwards will be fly-half Greig Tonks, who threw out a looping pass in the general direction of Johnny Williams, only to see Marcus Watson swoop on the bouncing ball and race up the wing to score a crucial first-half try.Williams wasn’t really at fault, as he had No 8 Nili Latu bearing down on him and the pass was not accurate enough to give him any chance of taking it.Thanks a lot: Marcus Watson on his way to score, but there was no joy for Irish. (Photo: Getty Images)Irish’s defeat was not just down to that one incident. They created several try-scoring chances but failed to take them. Early in the second half and trailing 10-6, they cut through the Falcons’ defence thanks to a great break by Alex Lewington and he passed inside to Asaeli Tikoiotuma, but instead of backing himself to score in the corner, the replacement centre passed to Andrew Fenby who was swallowed up by the relieved cover defence. Hurry up HarryHats off to Harry Thacker, who ran in a try from halfway for Leicester Tigers, helping them to a 30-24 win over Northampton Saints in the East Midlands derby.Thacker had the No 2 on his back, but this hooker used to be a fly-half and has also turned out at openside for the Tigers, so he is faster than the average front row.He put Leicester on the front foot in Saturday’s crucial match by out-sprinting the Northampton cover as he charged in from halfway to score under the posts, and even though he had Niki Goneva at his shoulder, ready to accept a pass, Thacker backed himself and did the job.Gloucester’s Ollie Thorley also scored a try to remember this weekend, as he crossed at Kingsholm on Friday evening to help his club end their five-match losing streak with a win over Exeter Chiefs. The 19-year-old was making his Premiership debut on the wing and it is worth noting that the last Gloucester player to score a try on his Premiership debut was Jonny May. That’s quite an act to follow. Ripping time: George Kruis tears the ball from Danny Care’s grasp. (Photo: Getty Images)Take Care of the ball Danny Care took England’s team camaraderie a step too far on Saturday at Wembley when he let England lock George Kruis rip the ball from his grasp at the back of a ruck on the Harlequins try-line and dot down for the simplest of tries.Admittedly, the Quins scrum-half gives away a considerable amount to Kruis in terms of height and weight, but he won’t enjoy watching that part of the highlights reel, especially as Saracens won 22-12. Wade-ing in! Christian Wade scoring his fifth try at Worcester. (Photo: Getty Images) Before the beak Fergus McFadden has some explaining to do this week after being cited for a wince-inducing high tackle on Damien Hoyland three minutes from the end of Leinster’s 30-23 Pro12 win over Edinburgh on Friday evening.Hoyland was heading at full speed towards the Leinster 22, with a try on his mind, when McFadden raced up and launched himself at the Scottish wing, making solid contact with his shoulder onto Hoyland’s neck and jaw. The Edinburgh player’s head whipped backwards, but he managed to get back to his feet quicker than McFadden, who landed very awkwardly.The referee, Marius Mitrea, decided the offence was only worth a penalty, but McFadden was cited for a dangerous tackle and so could face further punishment.Ouch! McFadden (left) and Hoyland were both floored after the tackle. (Photo: Inpho) Tries, trophies and tributes – as the end of the season approaches the stakes get higher for teams in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12. Who stood tall under pressure and who crumbled? Fine work, Finn Scotland fly-half Finn Russell stole the show in Glasgow Warriors’ 46-10 victory at Parc y Scarlets on Saturday, scoring two tries, four conversions and a penalty to see off one of their rivals for a top-four finish in the Guinness Pro12.Russell collected his own chip over the Scarlets‘ defence for his first try early in the game and added the conversion, then after 20 minutes he dived through a tackle to finish brilliantly at full stretch in the corner for Glasgow’s second try.Russell’s expertly-timed pass set up Henry Pyrgos for the bonus point try early in the second half, then he created a score for Tommy Seymour by taking an interception in his own half and staying strong through several attempted tackles. Before the end, the fly-half made a mazy run to put the Scarlets on the back foot again and when he was hauled down just short of the line, Lee Jones was on hand to score the points.Fine work, Finn: Russell offloading during the Warriors’ big win. (Photo: Inpho)Pro12 plaudits are also due to Niyi Adeolokun, who scored twice for Connacht in their landmark 35-14 defeat of Munster, and to Ulster full-back Jared Payne, who scored a hat-trick in his side’s 47-17 win at Zebre, which lifted Ulster up into the top four. It was also good to see Tommy Bowe crossing the whitewash twice on his return from injury. TAGS: Highlight The SaintsSuper sixWasps wing Christian Wade found six ways to score a try at Sixways on Saturday as he crossed the whitewash half-a-dozen times in his team’s 54-35 rout of Worcester in the Aviva Premiership.For the first try he finished off breaks by Rob Miller and Dan Robson with a simple run-in, for the second he received a pop pass from the back of a ruck and strode over in the right-hand corner, then he completed his hat-trick after 29 minutes with a skilful chip and chase from outside the 22. Wade found time for a fourth try before the break, collecting a grubber kick from Elliot Daly, then he had a bit more running to do for the fifth try as he snaffled an interception on his own ten-metre line and sprinted up the wing. He scored the sixth try in the 55th minute, dashing up in support of Charles Piutau after he had intercepted a Worcester pass in his own 22, and Wade ran the ball in from halfway.His feat equalled the record of six tries in an Aviva Premiership match which had been set by Ryan Constable of Saracens exactly 16 years ago, to the day. Wade set a new record too, by reaching the milestone of 50 Premiership tries in the fewest games as this was his 78th game and Sale’s Steve Hanley set the previous best of 79. (Thanks to Stuart Farmer for the stats.)Wade has moved up to second in the table of Premiership try-scorers this season with 11, but Thomas Waldrom is still ahead on 13. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Falling Short James Short has been Exeter’s own Bearded Wonder this season, scoring seven Premiership tries in his 18 matches, which is almost as many as his last three seasons put together. But the wing has now shaved off his trademark beard and maybe he has lost some of his powers in the process, as he made a comedy error in the closing minutes of the Chiefs’ 16-9 loss at Gloucester on Friday evening.Short got the ball in his own half and, from a standing start, beat the first defenders to get into space and set up what looked to be a dangerous attack, with support outside him. Then he somehow contrived to chuck the ball onto the turf, a good few metres ahead of himself, which gave Gloucester the scrum and helped them regain composure and close out the win. Chips with everything Gareth Anscombe helped Cardiff Blues to their fourth Pro12 win on the bounce when his deft chip over the defensive line off his weaker left foot put Reynold Lee-Lo over for a try against Newport Gwent Dragons.The score took the Blues from 11-8 up to 16-8 and from there they kicked on to win and keep their hopes of qualifying for the European Champions Cup well and truly alive.The Dragons defence had been disrupted by the loss of scrum-half Sarel Pretorious to a harsh yellow card for a deliberate knock-on. He was hoping to snap up an interception, but just dabbed the ball forward and referee Peter Fitzgibbon decided it was worth a sin-binning. White line fever Hallam Amos has done so much so well this season, but he butchered a try-scoring chance for the Dragons in the first half of their 28-8 loss at Cardiff Blues on Sunday. The Dragons were only 5-0 down when Amos was heading for the try-line and he dummied and was tackled, when he should have passed outside to full-back Carl Meyer, who had plenty of space to score himself, plus another team-mate outside him in support. Amos had scored six Pro12 tries in the last four matches, but he should have been provider, not scorer, this time.last_img read more

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South Sudanese face deadline to leave the north

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Sudan & South Sudan Africa, Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Ecumenical News International] Sudanese Christians who have barely a month to leave the north or risk being treated as foreigners are starting to move, but Christian leaders are concerned that the April 8 deadline set by Islamic-majority Sudan is unrealistic.“We are very concerned. Moving is not easy … people have children in school. They have homes … It is almost impossible,” Roman Catholic Bishop Daniel Adwok, the Khartoum archdiocese auxiliary told ENInews in a telephone interview on March 7.Sudan in February announced the deadline for the former citizens it had stripped of nationality after South Sudan’s January 2011 vote to secede. The ultimatum will affect an estimated 500,000-700,000 people, who are mainly Christians of southern origin that still live in the north.Many of them fled north during the long civil war fought between the Government of Sudan and the former rebels, the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement. They have lived there for decades together with children who were born there. Few have ties with South Sudan.The people are desperate to move, according to reports, following the deadline announcement and increasing tensions between the two nations over oil wealth. The tensions started escalating in January after the north allegedly started taking crude oil from the landlocked south, which it was exporting through a pipeline to Port Sudan on the Red Sea.“We want the rights of these people addressed by the two parliaments. Everyone has a right to choose where they want to live. It is a human right,” said Adwok.Sudan amended its laws after the south’s independence to say that Sudanese people automatically lose citizenship when they acquire by right or by other means the citizenship of South Sudan. Sudanese people in the north with any parents, grandparents or great grandparents born in South Sudan or belong to any southern ethnic group are considered that country’s nationals.“That’s the official deadline, but we don’t know how the Khartoum regime will react,” said John Ashworth, an adviser of the Sudan Ecumenical Forum.Some church leaders fear increased persecution of Christians in the north or even forced repatriation for those who may want to stay. “The fears have been there from the beginning. There could be some form of harassment, and that could intensify after that date, but for forceful removal, it is hard to ascertain,” said the Rev. Don Bosco Ochieng, a Roman Catholic priest in the Rumbek diocese.Aid agencies are calling for the extension of the deadline, warning that it will create a logistical and humanitarian catastrophe. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA South Sudanese face deadline to leave the north Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Fredrick NzwiliPosted Mar 8, 2012 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

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When religion and spirituality collide

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Br. John-Anthony OSBCn, Canon Community of St. Aidan, Victoria, BC says: [Religion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, the leader of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion, recently announced that he would step down by year’s end. A few days later, the Church of England rejected a Williams-backed unity plan for global Anglicanism, a church fractured by issues of gender and sexual identity. The timing of the resignation and the defeat are probably not coincidental. These events signal Anglicans’ institutional failure.But why should anyone, other than Anglicans and their Episcopal cousins in the U.S., care? The Anglican fight over gay clergy is usually framed as a left and right conflict, part of the larger saga of political division. But this narrative obscures a more significant tension in Western societies: the increasing gap between spirituality and religion, and the failure of traditional religious institutions to learn from the divide.Until recently, the archbishop of Canterbury was chief pastor for a global church bound by a common liturgy and Anglican religious identity.Expectations for religious leaders were clear: Run the church with courage and vision. Bishops directed the laity, inspiring obedience, sacrifice and heroism; they ordered faith from the top.Today’s world, however, is different.All institutions are being torn apart by tension between two groups: those who want to reassert familiar and tested leadership patterns — including top-down control, uniformity and bureaucracy; and those who want to welcome untested but promising patterns of the emerging era — grass-roots empowerment, diversity and relational networks. It is not a divide between conservatives and liberals; rather, it is a divide between institution and spirit.Top-down structures are declining. In the Anglicans’ case, spiritual and institutional leadership have been severed. The emerging vision maintains that spiritual leadership must be learned, earned and experienced distinct from, and often in tension with, the ascribed role of bishop.Williams’ career is a public illustration of the conflict. Early on, Williams was recognized as a teacher and pastor of deep spirituality, a person who practiced what he preached. He had the sort of character and imagination that the Anglican Communion most needed to move toward a new future.And that is where the trouble started — and where the story turns tragic. Williams was caught in an impossible situation. As Anglicans around the globe quarreled over the role of gays and lesbians in the church, the archbishop’s authority was called into question. Williams struggled to be both a spiritual leader who embraces the emerging vision and the leader of an institution committed to guarding the old order.The archbishop might be called “spiritual head” of Anglicanism, but he also acts as CEO of the Anglican religious corporation who must manage company policy, ensure profitability, maintain properties, open new markets and negotiate politics. It is a bureaucracy, often more a religion business than a vibrant spiritual community.For centuries, faith was top-down: Spiritual power flowed from pope to the faithful, archbishop to Anglicans, priest to the pious, pastor to congregation. This has changed as regular people confidently assert that spirituality is a grass-roots adventure of seeking God, a journey of insight and inspiration involving authenticity and purpose that might or might not happen in a church, synagogue or mosque. Spirituality is an expression of bottom-up faith and does not always fit into accepted patterns of theology or practice.Fearing this change, however, many religious bodies, such as the Anglican Communion, increasingly fixate on order and control, leading them to reassert hierarchical authority and be less responsive to the longings of those they supposedly serve. And that will push religion further into its spiral of irrelevance and decline.Williams demonstrated how wide the breach has become between spirituality and religion. His tenure proved that religious institutions — as they currently exist — fail when they refuse to engage the new pattern of faith.The gap between spirit and institution is not only problematic for religious organizations. The gap exists in business, where work and craft have been replaced by venture capital and profitability; in politics, where the common good and democracy are crushed by partisanship and corporate money; in education, where critical thought and the humanities are sacrificed to test scores.The Anglican crisis is not about Rowan Williams or even religion. It is about the drive for meaningful connection and community and a better, more just, and more peaceful world as institutions of church, state and economy seem increasingly unresponsive to these desires. It is about the gap between a new spirit and institutions that have lost their way. Only leaders who can bridge this gap and transform their institutions will succeed in this emerging cultural economy.The archbishop will return to teaching — a good choice. In our times, spiritual renewal is taking place among friends, in conversation, with trust and through mutual learning. A new thing is happening on the streets, in coffeehouses, in local faith communities, and in movements of justice and social change. Far from demands of institutional religion, Rowan Williams will find a new kind of faith is being born.— Diana Butler Bass is the author of eight books, most recently “Christianity After Religion: The End of Church and the Birth of a New Spiritual Awakening.” A version of this commentary originally appeared in USA Today. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Marius Jan Hulswit says: April 19, 2012 at 11:22 am Spiritual renewal has always taken place in the personal, the relational, the connectional. By its very definition we know that must be so. And, as soon as spirituality assumes praxis it is religion. This to say that the conflict is not between religion and spirituality (Lord, we have heard that enough.) It seems to me that the grievous failure of our institutions is self protection at great human cost. This would not be new, i.e. Caiaphas statement about the death of Jesus. As the sheepfold is challenged the shepherd with great urgency and stoney resolve makes the sheepfold impenetrable –some sheep are stiffled and some sheep cannot get in. Sue Thompson says: April 19, 2012 at 12:56 pm I believe we are witnessing the end of an era and the beginning of a new one. People are finally waking up and realizing that the hierarchical structure is just not working! At one time, becoming a priest was a vocation … it has now become a job! People are also realizing that the church in not a playground for popes and potentates. We are now moving in a positive direction by “taking back our church,” even if that means leaving the “institutional church.” The independent movement is on the rise and more and more people are meeting in homes and small rented spaces to focus more on the spiritual aspect of community than the business aspect. This, I believe, is getting back to our roots!Blessings Br. John-Anthony OSBCn, Canon Community of St. Aidan, Victoria, BC says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 18, 2012 at 7:06 pm To say that “for centuries faith was top down: spiritual power flowed from pope to faithful” etc., reveals a breathtaking ignorance of history. Has she never heard`of Francis of Assisi or Martin Luther or John Wesley. It’s been more like the Peter Principle with faith flowing upward until it stultifies at the top. Who was Archbishop of Canterbury when George Herbert was a Vicar? How many bishops can you name for Julian of Norwich’s church?It’s not “the Anglican Communion” that is “fixate(d) on authority” but African bishops and a small minority of Episcopalians who are trying to use authority to frustrate change while the Episcopal Church generally and a great many other Anglicans who are very responsive to a world of rapid change. Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing April 18, 2012 at 7:14 pm I agree with Ms Bass and I think the emergent faith of which she speaks is also happening in some congregations. Not all, certainly, but some. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Vicki Gray says: April 18, 2012 at 7:12 pm My experience specifically points within the Episcopal Church to the rise, institution and full expression and expansion of the Commission on Ministry model in regard to the demise of confident, capable, caring and in touch leadership and the subsequent growth of mediocrity over the last thirty plus years in the emergence of clergy (most especially those coming in as second career types) who mirror a church folk who want only tepid and highly feminized nurturing. I am not speaking about women clergy but clergy whose abilities are narrowly focused on maintaining declining demographically challenged hospice like cultures. As well, our governing and managing structures with bishops, staffs, PB and staff, House of Bishops and Executive Council look to managing scarcity rather than seeking a spiritual transformation found only in blunt self criticism. In five to ten more years, the combination of mediocre clergy and lay leadership, sightless episcopal governing, declining resources and emotional disinterest will limit our church foot print to the back our corporate heel. What is emerging is and will be new entities of people who are already finding their eternal refreshment in the incarnational and sacramental essence of the Book of Common Prayer tradition rehearsed in new forms and configurations whose view will be that of abundance, audacity and hope. They will not need COM’s or a House of Bishops. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs When religion and spirituality collide By Diana Butler BassPosted Apr 18, 2012 center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events April 19, 2012 at 3:13 pm I should state that the opinions expressed are my own and not those of the Community of St. Aidan or the Canon Communities of St. Benedict nor am I advocating that people leave the church!Blessings Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 18, 2012 at 6:13 pm Amen! A new thing is, indeed, happening on the streets…where young people, poor people, homeless people, politically engaged people are showing us how to be church. If we listen and respond, we might yet recover an old faith…the powerful itinerant faith of Acts. Comments (9) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ethel Ware Carter says: April 20, 2012 at 11:24 am John, thank you, really helpful. As Henri Nouwen stated many years ago, fear may be the original sin. And fear atomized spreads like a volatile cloud disintegrating association, affection and community. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Christopher L. Webber says: Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA April 18, 2012 at 6:12 pm Spot on , Dear Ms. Bass !!! Brava ! I’m certain Christ Himself would smile, and nod in agreement ! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img
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Episcopal seminary deans respond to racial incidents at Sewanee

first_imgEpiscopal seminary deans respond to racial incidents at Sewanee Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Theological Education Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] The deans of eight Episcopal seminaries released the following statement on March 18, speaking out against recent racial incidents at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.As Deans of the Episcopal Seminaries responsible for the formation of the leadership of The Episcopal Church, we stand with those persons who have been harmed by the recent events perpetrated by some of the undergraduate students at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.We support all those at the University of South, including the School of Theology, who are committed to do the hard work of racial justice and creating a safe and just place for all. We commit ourselves to doing the work in our institutions so that truly The Episcopal Church might be a welcoming place for all persons, committed to racial justice and thus pointing the way toward a world where the sacred humanity of all persons is respected.Racial justice is a fundamental Christian obligation. Vandalism and racial slurs are indicative of the continuing crisis of racism at Episcopal institutions. Such behaviors illustrate the depth of racism and a culture which fosters it. Our institutions are responsible for preparing students who will lead the way toward a more just future for all. Therefore, as faith leaders and educators, we are obligated to challenge white supremacy, name the racism, and commit afresh to change.The Very Reverend Kelly Brown Douglas, Ph.D.DeanEpiscopal Divinity School at UnionThe Very Rev. Kurt H. DunkleDean and PresidentGeneral Theological SeminaryThe Rev. Micah T.J. Jackson, PhDPresident,Bexley Seabury SeminaryThe Very Rev. Cynthia Briggs KittredgeDean and PresidentSeminary of the SouthwestThe Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D.Dean and PresidentVirginia Theological SeminaryThe Very Rev. Andrew B. McGowanDean and President,Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.The Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, Ph.D.,President and DeanChurch Divinity School of the PacificThe Very Rev. James F. TurrellDeanThe School of TheologyThe University of the South Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Mar 18, 2021 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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