Non-Aligned summit promises already forgotten as one journalist is arrested and another goes on hunger strike in prison

first_img Help by sharing this information News Reporters Without Borders voiced alarm today at the renewed harassment of independent journalists with Odelín Alfonso’s arrest by state security agents at his Havana home on 16 September and the stalled verdict in the trial of Alberto Gil Triay Casales, who began a hunger strike on 13 September in Valle Grande prison in west Havana in protest against the seven-year sentence he faces on a charge of “subversive propaganda.”“We firmly condemn the arbitrary arrest of Alfonso, who was already detained by the National Revolutionary Police in May,” the press freedom organisation said. “We are also worried about the fate of Triay Casales, who health is deteriorating. He has had several heart attacks and has high blood pressure. He also has a serious hip problem that could leave him disabled if it is not treated properly.”Reporters Without Borders added: “We call on the Cuban authorities to release these two journalists in accordance with the human rights commitments it made at the end of the Non-Aligned Movement summit in Havana.”A correspondent for the Miami-based news website Cubanet, Alfonso was previously arrested by the political police in May and ordered to put a stop to his journalistic activities. He was also told he would go to prison if he did not stop working as self-employed electrician. Alfonso said he did not comply with these demands.The founder of the Estrella Solitaria information centre, Triay Casales, 55, wrote articles every week for Payolibre, another Miami-based website. Following his arrest on 9 November, he was held for 20 days at the Department for Technical Investigation. He was hospitalised after several heart attacks and then transferred in early December to Valle Grande prison. His trial took place on 22 June, but no verdict or sentence has been announced. Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet Organisation News CubaAmericas New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council RSF_en Receive email alerts Newscenter_img RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago News Follow the news on Cuba CubaAmericas May 6, 2020 Find out more September 20, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Non-Aligned summit promises already forgotten as one journalist is arrested and another goes on hunger strike in prison October 15, 2020 Find out more to go further October 12, 2018 Find out morelast_img read more

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Eight bidders and eight minutes to give eight siblings over $800,000

first_imgThis is it just after the Hung family moved in, back in 1972.McGrath auctioneer Justin Nickerson presided over a rapid-fire auction which lasted about eight minutes, with four of the eight registered bidders taking the auction above its $800,000 reserve price without stopping.“Today there’s lots of memories,” Mr Hung said after the auction.“It’s wistful rather than sad and I think we’re pleased to be drawing a line, we’ve come to this point, the house is sold, and now we’re moving forward.” >>>FOLLOW THE COURIER-MAIL REAL ESTATE TEAM ON FACEBOOK<<< A lot has changed around 39 Bale St, Albion, but the property itself has remained untouched.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoMrs Hung passed away in 1983, and her husband gifted the property to their eight children when he died last year, aged 95.A crowd of 60 gathered in the backyard of the 610sq m property with dual street access, to watch the house sell. SEE WHAT ELSE IS FOR SALE IN ALBION The original kitchen is ready for a complete makeover.The Hung family travelled from Toowoomba, Tamworth, and across Brisbane to be present at the auction, with another brother living in Germany, hooked up to the auction via a smart watch.“We’re all heading to my place now to have a few nibblies and a coffee,” Mr Hung said.“I lived my formative years here. That big backyard was great, everyone played in backyards in those days.“And under the house was tall enough to do things, we’d have Christmas dinners under there with extended tables up on stumps.“In the 1974 flood, we watched the waters coming, they came up to the top step, nine inches below the floorboards.“We were fortunate to get all the cars out, including what had been my grandfather’s car, a 1939 Austin 8. That became Dad’s car, the green machine, and now it’s with my eldest brother and he’s going to do it up.”A total of 45 properties went to auction across Brisbane on the weekend, following on from a week which saw a Brisbane clearance rate of 42.6 per cent.The latest CoreLogic property data shows house prices in Albion are holding steady.The median house price is currently $769,000 which is the same as it was three months ago, and 1.3 per cent higher than this time last year. The property at 39 Bale St, Albion as it looks today.Among them was Russell Hung, who was almost 15 when his mum and dad bought 39 Bale St at Albion for $11,500 in 1972. With a Queensland nut tree offering some shade, the crowd of 60 had a great view of the house during the auction. It’s the same backyard where three of the family’s pets are buried, including Rusty the dog who didn’t make it through the 1974 floods.Bidding started at $600,000 and rose to $750,000 in $50,000 increments.“It then organically got to $827,000,” McGrath Wilston sales agent Craig Lea said.Putting in the winning bid was a party of two young couples from Albion and Newmarket who pooled their resources to invest in the property.This was their first auction and one couple was dialling in from overseas.“We plan to move in initially and see how the suburb changes with the proposed Albion train station development,” one of the buyers, who wished to remain anonymous, said. Norman and Ivy Hung already had three adult children when they moved into the three-bedroom Queenslander in June 1972, but they raised five other children there. The Hung family at their last Christmas gathering in 2018 before taking the family home to auction.EIGHT siblings secured an $827,000 legacy on the weekend after eight bidders took eight minutes to buy their family home at auction.All but one of the eight brothers and sisters returned to Brisbane for the auction, 47 years after they first moved in.last_img read more

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Ground attack: Syracuse looks to stop Stony Brook’s vaunted running game

first_img Published on September 13, 2012 at 4:03 am Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13 The game against Western Illinois still stands out to Scott Shafer. Five jobs and more than a decade ago, Shafer was a member of the Northern Illinois coaching staff when his Huskies took on a Football Championship Subdivision team with a slew of former Division-I players.He runs through the breakdown with ease: six kids that started their careers in the Big Ten, Southeastern Conference or Mid-American Conference only to wind up at Western Illinois.“If you look across the board, there are a lot of kids that signed Division I and transferred,” said Shafer, the Syracuse defensive coordinator.But he has faced perhaps no FCS player with more D-I accomplishments than running back Marcus Coker, who ran for 1,384 yards in his sophomore season at Iowa in 2011 before transferring to Stony Brook. Now Coker is part of a loaded Seawolves (2-0) backfield that averages 411 rushing yards per game and should provide a test at 4 p.m. Saturday inside the Carrier Dome as Syracuse (0-2) looks for its first win of the season.It would be easy for the Orange to pay no mind to the rushing statistics Stony Brook accumulated through its first two games, writing them off to a lower level of competition as part of the FCS. But Syracuse linebacker Dan Vaughan said any team that rushes for 521 yards and nine touchdowns, as the Seawolves did last week against Pace, must be taken seriously.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Any time you face a team that can put up close to 600 yards of offense, I don’t care what level it’s at,” Vaughan said. “That’s a big deal.”Though Coker’s name carries the most clout, he is certainly not the only Stony Brook tailback who can run wild against an opposing defense. The Seawolves have four different rushers with more than 140 yards already this season, including Miguel Maysonet, who leads the team with 225 yards and a touchdown.Coker, who is still adjusting to a new scheme and new teammates, scored in the season opener against Central Connecticut and earned the start last week against Pace.“I think Maysonet is probably a little bit more shifty, and Coker will run it right down your throat,” Shafer said. “They are a little bit different, they really are. But they are incredibly competitive. You can tell that they’re fighting for reps, too.”Shafer said that Stony Brook’s offensive line is a strong one led by sophomore center Mike Lisi and junior right tackle Michael Bamiro. He highlighted Lisi’s athleticism and ability to pull around the edge as two of his strengths, and said Bamiro’s 6-foot-8-inch, 345-pound frame is simply monstrous.Put together, the line guided the Stony Brook offense to the top of the FCS in total offense with 591 yards per game through the first two weeks of the season — nearly 50 yards more than any other team in the country.“They’ve got a bunch of big old offensive lineman there that have played a lot of football that do a good job pulling,” Shafer said. “They try to get you on the edge, and then those (running backs) can slash it back against the grain. They’re a very good offense.”It presents Syracuse’s defense with a platform to stifle a unit that is yet to be contained in 2012. Defensive tackle Jay Bromley said any team that comes into a game determined to run the ball 60 or 70 times — the Seawolves ran it 57 times last week — is disrespecting its opponent.So Bromley and Co. plan to come out fiery on Saturday, prepared for a physical battle with bragging rights up for grabs if the Orange can become the first defense to slow down Stony Brook.“We can’t let anyone come in and run the ball down our throats,” he said.Yet that will undoubtedly be Stony Brook’s goal, as the Seawolves’ quarterbacks have attempted only 25 passes through two games. To put that in context, SU’s Ryan Nassib threw 65 passes in Week 1 alone.That’s why Bromley said the plan is to hit Stony Brook’s offensive linemen hard on Saturday and hopefully shut down the run. He said the Seawolves have no interest in passing the ball, and if the Orange can force them to do so, the game will likely be tilted in Syracuse’s favor.Every defensive lineman loves to take on a quarterback like Southern California’s Matt Barkley, since it’s a chance to get a few sacks against a pass-happy offense. But it’s the smash-mouth game that linemen love, so Saturday should be fun.“This game is not on the linebackers, it’s not on the defensive backs, it’s on us,” Bromley said. “They want to put their hand in the ground and run the ball, so we have to show them that we’re not going to back down from anybody.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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