Green Mountain Power Launches New Program for Customers to Combat Global Warming

first_imgGreen Mountain Power (NYSE: GMP)announced its introduction of a new monthly renewable energy service,CoolHomesm, that will enable its customers to take action in the fightagainst global warming. Voluntary charitable donations will help to buildVermont methane generators and other renewable energy projects, which willreduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming.”We’ve made it very simple for customers to do something that works everyday to fight global warming,” said Stephen C. Terry, Green MountainPower’s Senior Vice President of Corporate and Legal Affairs. “Now ourcustomers who are concerned about global warming can choose to include acontribution to the non-profit Clean Air-Cool Planet on their GreenMountain Power bill each month. Our electricity supply is alreadyunusually low in emissions. Now our customers can choose to lessen theimpact of their total energy use,” he says.Green Mountain Power’s new CoolHomesm program allows customers to supportfledgling renewable energy projects through $6 monthly tax-deductibledonations to Clean Air-Cool Planet (CA-CP), a nonprofit organizationbringing climate change solutions to the Northeast. CA-CP in turn usesthe donations to support development of new renewable energy projectsthrough Vermont-based NativeEnergy.Each household participating for one year reduces carbon dioxide emissionsby six tons – the annual fossil fuel and electricity-related emissions ofthe average Vermont household. CA-CP makes this happen by purchasing andretiring “renewable energy credits” from NativeEnergy, allowingparticipating households to enjoy a year of “climate-neutral” living.”We’re excited to work with Green Mountain Power in this initiative,” saidAdam Markham, Clean Air-Cool Planet’s Executive Director. “It’s a greatway to increase awareness about global warming and demonstrate theimportance of individual action.To show their support for the program, Green Mountain Power, theDepartment of Public Service and the Public Service Board have all offseta year’s emissions from their offices’ total energy use. The Departmentplayed a leadership role in calculating the annual carbon dioxideemissions for the entire office building the Department and the Boardshare with AARP and Chittenden Bank. Their collective participationresulted in Montpelier’s first “climate-neutral” large office building.”I’m delighted to see Green Mountain Power offering this fine choice toits customers,” noted Michael Dworkin, Chairman of the Vermont PublicService Board. “This kind of market-based initiative will give thousandsof Vermonters a chance to make a contribution towards a better world forall of us. At the same time, it shows how a small utility can be a leaderin an emerging field. I look forward to this innovation becoming a model,as others offer similar choices to their customers.”The Green Mountain Power program passes 100% of the donated funds to CleanAir-Cool Planet, which supports the development of new renewable energyprojects utilizing the services of Vermont-based NativeEnergy. Thefinancial support is provided through Clean Air-Cool Planet’s up-frontpurchase of long-term streams of the projects’ renewable energy credits,which Clean Air-Cool Planet will then retire to assure permanentenvironmental benefit and fulfill its mission to reduce global warming.last_img read more

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Japan again bans US beef over BSE fears

first_img Dec 12, 2005, CIDRAP News story “Japan ends BSE-related ban on US beef” Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi announced the renewed ban Jan 20, just a few weeks after shipments had resumed in mid-December. US Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns called the presence of the spine material “an unacceptable failure on our part” to honor the agreement with Japan and promised to take corrective actions. Johanns said he had ordered additional USDA inspections at plants that process beef for export. He also promised to: Order unannounced inspections at facilities that produce beef for export. The Japanese Agriculture Ministry said inspectors found cattle backbone material in 3 of 41 boxes in a 389-kilogram shipment of beef from Atlantic Veal & Lamb Inc., according to a Jan 20 Associated Press (AP) report. The firm is located in Brooklyn, N.Y., other reports said. Investigate the violation and report to the Japanese on the findings and corrective actions. When he was asked if he viewed the renewed import ban as an overreaction, Johanns replied, “I do not believe so at all. . . . In some situations we have taken the same sort of action where we would close borders.” Transcript of Jan 20 USDA press conference Atlantic Veal & Lamb has been barred from shipping beef to Japan, Johanns said. “We will take the appropriate personnel action against the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service [FSIS] employee who conducted the inspection of the product in question and approved it for shipment into the Japanese marketplace,” he added. In a Jan 20 news conference, Johanns said backbones from cattle younger than 20 months are not classified as SRM under US regulations, but the agreement with Japan banned all cattle backbones. “Very clearly what we have learned about this shipment is that it failed to meet the terms of the agreement,” he said, according to a transcript. Provide for further training of FSIS inspectors on export requirements. Jan 23, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Japan has again banned American beef following the discovery last week of cattle spine material in an imported shipment, a violation of the recent bilateral agreement designed to keep beef tainted with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) out of Japan. Japan cut off imports of US beef after the nation’s first case of BSE was found in a Canadian-born cow in Washington state in December 2003. Japan officially agreed on Dec 12, 2005, to resume imports of beef from cattle no more than 20 months old. The agreement required the removal of specified risk materials (SRM)—tissues likely to be contaminated in BSE-infected animals—such as the brain, eyes, vertebral column, spinal cord, and tonsils. Send a team to work with the Japanese to reexamine US beef already in Japan to confirm compliance with the agreement. In a statement, Atlanatic Veal & Lamb said, “We regret that there was a misinterpretation of the export requirements and an honest mistake involving a very small amount of product that has led to this degree of concern.” “This just simply should not have happened,” he said. Atlantic Veal & Lamb statementhttp://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/statement-of-atlantic-veal-and-lamb-on-suspension-of-ability-to-export-53683637.html See also: The inspector who approved the meat for shipment to Japan “for whatever reason just did not connect to the fact that the vertebral column needed to be removed before it arrived in Japan,” Johanns said. The company said it was “absolutely confident” that the product was safe. “It is important to note that Atlantic Veal produces veal derived from very young animals—animals that have never tested positive for BSE. We estimate that the veal we shipped came from animals who were less than 4 1/2 months of age,” the statement said.last_img read more

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Captains hold team together

first_imgGREGORY DIXON/Herald photoThe Wisconsin women?s hockey team ? winner of two straight National Championships ? believes one constant has boosted their program in recent years: leadership.For captain Emily Morris and alternate captains Jinelle Zaugg and Jessie Vetter, they couldn?t be more proud to be the leaders of the 2007-08 Badgers.?It was quite an honor,? Zaugg said of being elected alternate captain. ?There were great leaders here when I was an underclassman, and I hope that I can help the team have the success we have had the past two seasons.?Being a captain, however, is a very loose term. It can be approached in very different ways, according to head coach Mark Johnson.?There is a lot of little things that a captain does, but there isn?t an itinerary of one through 10 for what a captain is supposed to do,? Johnson said. ?The most important thing is that they need to have a pulse on the team throughout the season, provide the younger players with advice and overall just be mentors for the team. They are experienced, and they have been through all of the situations.??It is a long season, so if they keep everyone on an even keel, then they are doing their job.?The captains? teammates believe that the three leaders have done a great job of keeping together the Badger team that has gone 21-7-2 this season.?Being a captain on the team, it is really crucial to speak up when the team isn?t coming together,? junior Erika Lawler said. ?Those three do a great job solving communication issues, whether it is communication between players and the coaches, or players and other players. All three of them have the respect of the team and the respect of the coaches, and I think these three were chosen because of how well they fulfill that role.?While the team respects all three captains, each has a very unique leadership style. Morris, for instance, is considered to be the most vocal of the three.?When something needs to be said, I am not one to just let it go by without comment,? Morris said. ?I like to speak my mind, and if the team looks sluggish I will let them know about it.?Zaugg and Vetter, on the other hand, prefer to let their actions speak louder than their words.?Vetter and I try to lead by example,? Zaugg said. ?I usually shouldn?t say what is on my mind during a game, so we leave the locker room stuff to Morris. Vetter and I try to work hard, prepare properly, and I think the rest of the team feeds off that and follows suit.?While each of them leads with a different style, they all try to emphasize the same thing when they are teaching.?The number one thing I try to teach is you have to be having fun,? Zaugg said. ?Whether it is in practice or in the games, if you are not having fun, you are not going to be playing to the best of your abilities, and for our team I think that while you need to work hard in practice, you have to have fun too. Otherwise, your hard work won?t pay off during the game.??There are two things I really emphasize as a captain,? Morris added. ?Having fun is the main one, because it is a game, and we always need to remember that. The other thing is positive reinforcement. I was given some advice from some close friends, and they said positive reinforcement breeds positive performance. I have really taken that to heart and tried to make that my focus.?Whatever their methods are, Morris, Zaugg and Vetter have won over the hearts and respect of their teammates.?The most important part of being a leader is how you conduct yourself, and those three have shown all the maturity in the world leading this team,? Lawler said. ?Whether it is on the ice or in the locker room, the team listens to what they have to say because of how they handle themselves.?last_img read more

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