VINS gets $30,000 from TransCanada for environmental education programs

first_imgWith more than 60 years’ experience, TransCanada is a leader in the responsible development and reliable operation of North American energy infrastructure, including hydroelectric power generation, natural gas and oil pipelines, and gas storage facilities.  A growing independent power producer, TransCanada owns or has interests in more than 10,800 megawatts of power generation in Canada and the United States.  For more information, visitwww.transcanada.com(link is external), and follow on Twitter @TransCanada. VINS is a nonprofit, member-supported environmental education, research, and avian rehabilitation organization based in Quechee, VT.  Through partnerships and collaborations with other conservation and education organizations, VINS makes high-quality, compelling and fun environmental education programs and learning opportunities accessible to people and communities throughout New England.  For more information, visit the VINS website at www.vinsweb.org(link is external) and the VINS Nature Blog at vtnature.blogspot.com. VINS 12.13.2011 ‘Supporting the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and its impressive environmental education work aligns directly with TransCanada’s commitment to the environment and desire to improve the quality of life for residents of Vermont and New England,’ said Matthew Cole, Community Relations Advisor for TransCanada.  ‘We realize the importance of these programs to the success and growth of healthy, vibrant communities.’ The Vermont Institute of Natural Science (VINS) has been awarded a $30,000 Community Investment grant from TransCanada, an energy infrastructure company with operations throughout North America including eight hydroelectric stations in Vermont.  The grant has been awarded to support VINS’ conservation and environmental education programs and boost the organization’s fundraising for program outreach in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene. Through its Community Investment program, TransCanada supports local associations and organizations that serve as community assets in empowering individuals, building strong communities, and creating effective citizens.center_img ‘VINS provides innovative, award-winning environmental education opportunities for the children, adults, citizen scientists, and professional educators of New England,’ explained VINS president John Dolan.  ‘TransCanada’s Community Investment grant is a strong vote of confidence in the quality of VINS’ programs and a demonstration of TransCanada’s commitment to our community and VINS’ long-term success.’last_img read more

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Kids dying because of drinking – experts

first_imgNZ Herald 22 March 2012Hundreds of children are injured, killed or abused every year by caregivers who have been drinking but agencies are failing to grasp the extent of the problem, experts say. An Alcohol Action conference on children and alcohol in Wellington today heard how the true extent of the problem was unknown because of a lack of reliable statistics on alcohol harm to others. Otago University head of preventive and social medicine Professor Jennie Connor said most of the information routinely gathered by government agencies, social workers and hospitals did not include such data.“Of course we don’t need more data in order to do something about these problems but the gaps in knowledge are important because we get a biased idea of the impact of alcohol, and we need the information in order to be strong advocates,” she said. “We carefully carry out surveillance of things like infectious diseases in New Zealand, and we collect this information so that we can act on it. We can identify trouble spots, we know what the trends are. We don’t do this for alcohol-related harm to others. We need to.”Prof Connor said her research found hospital emergency departments had no systematic way of collecting data on alcohol-related injuries, even for patients who caused the harm to themselves. And Child, Youth and Family was unable to supply data on how widespread alcohol use was in cases of neglect or emotional, sexual or physical abuse. Prof Connor’s research team asked CYF for statistics but the request was declined because the agency’s data was of insufficient quality for the researchers to use.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10793899last_img read more

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O’Brien hails Lockinge hope

first_img A dual Grade One winner in America, he faces an altogether different test in Berkshire as he will be racing on grass for the first time, and the straight mile presents another new challenge for him. “He’s a very exciting horse. For us to get a horse like him is incredible,” said O’Brien. “He’s been very natural and very relaxed. He’s a big powerhouse of a horse. I’d say his trip is around a mile and he could end up at the Breeders’ Cup again.” Aidan O’Brien is anticipating big things from his US import Verrazano, who has his first run for the yard in the JLT Lockinge Stakes at Newbury. Paul Deegan’s Sruthan is a second Irish contender and is on the up having won his last two races at Group Three level, but the trainer is well aware this will require another step forward. “He won’t be out of place,” said Deegan. “It’s a bit of a shot in the dark, although it looks a better race now than it might have done a week or so ago. Originally it looked a penalty kick for Olympic Glory but now with Verrazano and Chopin, it’s a good race. “He’s done little wrong, he’s won four of his seven races and the last two were Group Threes. There are not many Group Twos he can go for. “I thought he always wanted good ground to be seen at his best but his last two races have been on soft and they’ve been his best, so he’s versatile. There’s a couple in there that might want it soft. “We’ll know more after this. We went to the Gladness thinking he needed the run, but he won it well. I felt before that he’d improve for the race and he certainly has at home. Whether he’s a Group One horse or not we’ll find out.” Frankie Dettori believes the race is the perfect starting point for Olympic Glory. Richard Hannon’s colt impressed hugely in first-time blinkers when winning the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes but was last seen trailing home behind American superstar Wise Dan in the Breeders’ Cup Mile on firm ground at Santa Anita. “I’ve ridden him work three times and he only does enough, that’s why he wears the headgear,” Dettori told Racing UK. “He seems in tremendous shape, is best on a straight track and a mile is ideal for him. It looks the perfect starting point. Press Association “Every Group One is hard to win so we certainly won’t be taking anything for granted. We’ll just do our own thing and hope it is good enough. One thing is he has won first time out at two and first time out at three, so I hope it’s the same again at four.” Hannon also runs Montiridge, the mount of Richard Hughes, but believes Olympic Glory is a worthy favourite. “We know he has the class – he won the QEII Stakes at Ascot last year – and, though that was in a mudbath, people seem to forget that on good ground he finished second to Dawn Approach in a Coventry and ran Moonlight Cloud to a short head in the Prix Jacques le Marois at Deauville,” he told his website. “We have no qualms about the going and he has a favourite’s chance. “We also run Montiridge, who is rated 10lb inferior to Olympic Glory. This is a step up in class for him but, though he was beaten fair and square by Tullius in the Sandown Mile, unlike the winner he did not have a run under his belt, so hopefully our fellow can improve on that.” last_img read more

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