Bay Avenue Construction Update

first_imgConstruction work will cause detours on Bay Avenue. The Cape May County Municipal Utilities Authority is replacing and rehabilitating the force mains that carry wastewater to the treatment plant on the bay at 45th Street. The work will be done on 31st Street from Haven Avenue to Bay Avenue and on Bay Avenue from 31st Street to Eighth Street.Work for March 16-20:The contractor has installed PVC pipe, backfilled and temporarily paved from the southern terminus of the project on 31st Street going northward to midway between 13th Street and 12th Street, and from the northern terminus of the project near Eighth Street, going southward to the south side of Ninth Street. Starting Monday, the contractor’s south crew will be progressing with work going northward toward 12th Street. The contractor’s north crew will be progressing southward toward 10th Street.Traffic:31st Street is closed to traffic between Simpson and Haven avenues.Next week, Bay Avenue will be open to local traffic only from 14th Street to Ninth Street.See full project updatelast_img read more

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Former MIT president to serve as visiting professor at Harvard Kennedy School

first_img Read Full Story Susan Hockfield, who served as the 16th president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has been named the Marie Curie Visiting Professor at Harvard Kennedy School,  Dean David T. Ellwood announced Sept. 7.Hockfield is a distinguished life scientist who has focused much of her research on the development of the brain and on glioma, a deadly form of brain cancer. She joined the faculty of Yale University in 1985 after serving on the scientific staff at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. From December 2004 through June 2012, Hockfield served as the first female president of MIT, where she continues to hold a faculty appointment as professor of neuroscience.“I have long admired Susan Hockfield’s passion and dedication as a research scientist, university leader and national policy advocate,” said Ellwood. “Hers is a track record of remarkable distinction, and we are thrilled to welcome President Hockfield to the Kennedy School.”At the Kennedy School, Hockfield will be affiliated with the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, where she plans to continue her work on behalf of sound policies and practices for sustainable energy and a resurgence in American manufacturing.  She also plans to explore neural foundations of community and leadership.last_img read more

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Club celebrates Arabic language, culture

first_imgMendoza’s Jordan Auditorium hosted the third annual Arabic Culture Night Friday, as students were able to experience a variety of forms of performing arts from the Middle East.The event consisted of several folkloric dances from Egypt and Lebanon as well as an oriental dance, a song, a poetry recitation, a comedy play and a slide show showcasing the program of Arabic Language and Culture.All music, reading and dialogue was in Arabic and performed by students, most of whom are Arabic majors or Mediterranean/Middle East Studies minors.Professor Ghada Bualuan, chair of the Arabic Department and director and producer of the event, said it was a great way for students to experience Arabic culture and for the performers at the event to showcase their talents.“It was a unique opportunity to engage and explore the Arabic culture and forge a deeper connection to its people,” she said. “It was also an outlet for students of Arabic to perform on stage in the language and the culture that they are learning in the classroom.”Sophomore Joseph Dufour, vice president of the Arabic Club, said the event was a special opportunity to share Arabic culture with the rest of the University.“Students were able to enjoy song, dance, poetry and imagery that they wouldn’t otherwise likely get to experience at Notre Dame,” he said.  “It’s really a one-of-a-kind event and has grown in performances and popularity every year.”Junior Victoria Braga, a member of the Arabic Club, said the format of the event has grown stronger with each passing year.“Students attending the event hopefully learned more about Arabic Language and Culture,” she said. “This is the ultimate goal of the event, and we are happy that it seems the event has met its goal not only this year but in all of the past three years of its existence.”Bualuan said the inspiration for an event to share Middle Eastern culture came from students and from her own husband.“I started it two years ago with the idea of creating an opportunity for Arabic major students to connect to Arabic history and culture through music and arts,” she said. “Also, my husband produced several international festivals over 15 years ago at Notre Dame as a student, and I knew that his experience would be very useful.”Dufour said the event was a success because it blended performance with education.“Everyone there seemed to really enjoy the night whether they study Arabic or not,” he said. “It showcased aspects of the Arabic culture that people may not know about or [to people] who don’t study Arabic, especially since the readings and song in Arabic all had English translations on an accompanying slideshow to the event.”Bualuan echoed Dufour’s sentiment, noting that attendance at the event was very strong, with Jordan Auditorium at standing room only capacity. She said over 350 students attended, and their response was positive.“They were very excited, and the event has grown each year. I’ve already received many emails from students who were in the audience saying that they want to be part of the show next year,” she said.last_img read more

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Mosquito Season

first_imgSubtropical Storm Alberto has departed, and the rains will eventually subside. What happens next is predictable: mosquitoes.Every possible container around our homes, yards and neighborhoods is holding water and offering its services as a mosquito breeding site. It is up to all of us to ensure that this does not occur. Mosquitoes in their larval and pupal stages require standing water, and the most efficient, effective technique to cut down the adult mosquito population is to eliminate standing water.   But this can be trickier than it appears, and eliminating standing water will take everyone’s combined effort. This year’s mosquito season has had a relatively slow start. Despite a warm February, a cool March slowed development, and winter was dry across middle and south Georgia, where many of Georgia’s natural mosquito habitats occur. The recent rains have made the upper portion of the state relatively wet and left water standing in low-lying areas. These temporary habitats can be very productive for mosquitoes due to the lack of fish and other aquatic predators. Localized rainfall events play a major role in most mosquito populations and their potential for disease transmission.All mosquitoes need moisture, either standing water or boggy soil, to develop from eggs to adults. Only adult mosquitoes bite. Georgians often remember to rinse birdbaths and dump out buckets and toys, and there are many other potential mosquito habitats that people often forget. The most common larval habitats around homes and gardens are the dishes and trays associated with potted plants. Other habitats include tarps, downspouts, underground drainage systems and boats. Basically, anything that can hold water can become a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Used tires are a particularly problematic habitat for container-breeding mosquitoes. Residents should contact their local solid-waste departments to find out about scrap tire amnesty days or other ways to dispose of old tires.In addition to containers, some low-lying areas will hold water, allowing flood-water species of mosquitoes to emerge. Flood-water mosquitoes commonly deposit their eggs in low-lying areas with moist soils. When these areas become flooded, the eggs hatch and a brood of mosquitoes develops. These types of mosquitoes are more common along river bottoms and across central and south Georgia. While local transmission of the Zika virus was never observed in Georgia during the recent outbreak, the risk of being exposed to the West Nile virus (WNV) continues to be a real threat. Last year the Georgia Department of Public Health recorded 64 human cases of WNV and seven deaths. The number of people exposed to the virus was surely much greater, as only 1 in 5 people exposed to the virus typically become ill. Peak transmission of WNV occurs between Aug. 15 and Sept. 15 annually, but suppressing mosquito populations now can help to prevent larger mosquito populations and the compounding effects on disease transmission. The best way to prevent mosquito-borne disease is to avoid mosquito bites. Wearing pants and long sleeves that are loose-fitting and lightly colored minimizes our attractiveness to the host-seeking female mosquito. Only female mosquitoes bite. They need a blood meal to develop eggs. Using Environmental Protection Agency-approved insect repellents is also extremely important. When used as directed, EPA-registered repellents are proven safe and effective. Approved repellents include the long-time standard DEET, picaridin (widely used in Europe) and three materials that are classified as biopesticides by the EPA: lemon eucalyptus oil, IR3535 and 2-Undecanone. The 2-Undecanone material is the newest EPA-approved active ingredient, composed of natural compounds from the leaves and stems of the wild tomato plant. When using any of these products, it is important to always follow the label instructions. Adults should always apply repellents to children and avoid their hands, eyes, mouth and irritated skin. For more information about reducing mosquito populations, visit www.extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

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Ralph Howard Davis

first_imgRalph Howard Davis, 93, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Thursday, December 15, 2016 in Dillsboro, IN.He was born April 9, 1923 in Greensburg, IN, son of the late Charles and Florence Davis. Ralph was raised by William and Effie Wells.He served Country as a member of the United States Navy during WWII as well as the Korean Conflict.Ralph worked as a laborer for Grinnell Plumbing, retiring after over 21 years of service.He attended the Moores Hill United Methodist Church.  Ralph was very patriotic and took pride in everything he did, he was a perfectionist. He loved being with family and he enjoyed doing yardwork.Surviving are children, Ralph E. Davis, David Davis, Diane Cowan and Karen Kremer, grandchildren, Paul and Keith Cowan, Shawna Cowan, Diana, Ronda, Laramie, Autumn and Cheyene Davis, 25 great grandchildren, 5 great great-grandchildren.He was preceded in death by his parents and 11 siblings.Friends will be received Monday, December 19, 2016, 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the Funeral Home, on Tuesday, at 1:00 pm with Pastor Brian Dunaway officiating.Interment will follow in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana 47001. Military graveside services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions may be made to defray Funeral Expenses. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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St. Lucia Government to Outline New Recovery Plan Post COVID-19

first_img“The COVID-19 Economic Recovery and Resilience Plan primarily seeks to curtail the impact of both global and domestic economic contraction is having on the business sector, drive economic activity through public sector capital investment projects, protect the poor, marginalized and most vulnerable segments of the St. Lucian population, accelerate reforms that will build the resilience of the private public sector, strengthen the Health System and continue to build a resilience of St. Lucia,” the statement noted. The plan was prepared by the Ministry of Finance with recommendations from the Economic Recovery Multi-Sectoral Committee, comprising representatives from the private sector, trade unions and employers. “The government is aware that no segment of our country has been spared from the COVID-19 pandemic and there has been the loss of household income and job security with many St. Lucians on the breadline,” the statement said, adding that the government has taken immediate measures to address some of these issues including the income support programme and the national feeding programme. In a statement, the government said that Prime Minister Allen Chastanet said that the plan is part of his administration’s structured and long term response to the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. “That body was tasked with making recommendations to prepare an Economic Recovery and Resilience Plan given the adverse effects, that “lock down” and physical distancing measures have had on earnings of all sectors within the economy. CASTRIES, St. Lucia – The St. Lucia government Wednesday said it would present an economic recovery and resilience plan for the island on Sunday, even as the main opposition St. Lucia Party (SLP) accused the government of wasteful spending.center_img “In the years and months after the Prime Minister made those fiscal pronouncements, he proceeded to manage the affairs of St. Lucia in a manner that directly contradicted this statement. In fact, he managed St. Lucia like a country that is rich in natural resources such as oil, gold, diamonds, etc. with the wealth accruing to a very small subset of the population. We will describe this as a ‘cabal economy,” the SLP added. ’The party said that the government had not implemented programmes to assist ordinary citizens and those engaged in the small and medium enterprises, but appears to be engaged in “transferring wealth from the taxpayers …to family, friends and foreigners associated with the government”. But the SLP in a statement posted on its official Facebook page reminded St. Lucians that soon after coming to office in 2016, Prime Minister Chastanet had informed the country that the island ‘is broke”. CMClast_img read more

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US Open: Venus Williams Crashes Out As Unstoppable Madison Keys beats Vandeweghe To Reach…

first_img“I don’t think I would have had it any other way. I’m just super proud and honoured to be a part of what these four girls were, what we did tonight.”Elsewhere, in another all American semi final, world number 15, Madison Keys dispatched Coco Vandeweghe 6-1 6-2 to take her place in the final.The final between Stephens and Keys will be the first all American Us Open final since Serena Williams beat Venus in 2002.Stephens and Keys will also be making their first appearance in a Grand Slam final.RelatedUS Open Roundup: Venus Williams Wins Dramatic Tie Breaker To Set Up All American SemisSeptember 6, 2017In “Tennis”US Open: Sloane Stephens Wins All American Final To Earn First Grand Slam TitleSeptember 10, 2017In “Tennis”French Open Recap (Women): Sloane Stephens Beats Kasatkina To Secure All-American Semifinal Meeting With KeysJune 6, 2018In “Sports” Venus Williams has failed to make it back to back Grand Slam final after losing to unseeded fellow American Sloane Stephens in the US Open semi final clash at Flushing Meadows.Sloane Stephens held her own to beat Williams 6-1 0-6 7-5 to reach her first ever career Grand Slam final.Speaking after her remarkable victory, Stephens said: “Having four Americans in the semi-finals, I think that says a lot about American tennis and where we are right now,”last_img read more

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