H-DNL football: St. Bernard’s wins slugfest against Eureka

first_imgFor the first time in program history, St. Bernard’s reigns supreme over Eureka High.Will Omey rushed for two touchdown, Lane Thrap added a third and the Crusaders defense controlled its neighbors from down from the way from the first kick to the final knee as St. Bernard’s downed Big 4 Conference foe Eureka 21-13, Saturday afternoon at Crusader Field.“We stood tall today,” Crusaders head coach Matt Tomlin said. “I couldn’t be more proud. We practice as a family, play as a family and win as a …last_img

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Production Tips: Getting Started with Low-Budget Stunt Coordination

first_imgNeed to (safely) coordinate some stunts for your next project? Here’s what you need to know to get started in the wild world of stunt coordination.First and foremost, stunts are dangerous. All stunts. Whether it’s running from a giant explosion or slipping on a wet tile floor, stunts can result in injury or even death — even when planned properly. This article is for educational purposes only.Stunts are exciting! They can add a real sense of danger to a fist fight when suddenly Wham! the hero gets suplexed through a table. They can add physical comedy to catch the audience off guard, like a character falling out of his chair unexpectedly. Stunts can also add a nice level of production value. But that doesn’t mean that all stunts have to be expensive.Now, blowing up buildings and flipping cars is beyond the scope of this article. Here we will go over a basic introduction to stunt coordination and some small-but-exciting stunts for low budgets.Stunt CoordinationSo what is stunt coordination? Stunt coordination involves safely planning out and executing stunts, such as falls, fights, chase scenes, etc. The stunt coordinator needs to work with the director, cinematographer, and often even the production designer and costume department in order to plan out the safest way to pull off a stunt — big or small. Emphasis on safest!Remember, film is all about illusions. Yes, practical stunts are real and dangerous; they depend on meticulous planning. Also keep in mind that the stunt needs to be safe enough to perform multiple times. Maybe your stunt double is tough and totally cool with taking that big hit and getting winded and bruised — or whatever. But if they can’t do it multiple times, or if doing it multiple times will injure them permanently, then it’s no good. No film project is worth death or permanent injury.So how can we pull off some impressive-looking stunts on a tight budget and still be safe? With planning and coordination.Planning and CoordinationIf you’re using a stunt double, I’d recommend checking out my previous article on how to maintain the stunt double illusion.Let’s go over two types of falls: one with gym mats and one with wires. For either one, it’s always good to have your stunt double wear some kind of padding on their body. Some reliable, low-budget padding is available online or from you local sporting goods store. Get some compression padded shorts to protect the hips and tailbone and some knee and elbow pads if you plan any stunts involving either of those. You can also purchase a low-cost motorcycle spine protector. Foldable gym mats are available at Amazon for a decent price.For this first example, use the spine protector. In this stunt, my character gets lifted and slammed through a table and knocked out.Let’s break this down. Framed just out of shot are a series of pads beneath the table. The table itself is cheaply made (particle board), and we removed all the supports. This allows for the table to effortlessly break as I pass through it (another method, if you’re able to afford it, is to either buy or make a breakaway table from balsa wood). Take note, as I pass through it: my co-actor is holding onto me the entire time and merely guiding me through the table. He is using some force, but he is not slamming me. This is important because even with pads and a breakaway table, getting slammed into the ground can cause some serious injuries.The natural pull of gravity and a bit of acting is what sells the table crash.The second example requires hip pads.In this stunt, my character gets kicked clean off his feet and falls straight to his side, bewildered. This stunt involves some wire work. As you can see, the wires have been removed digitally. We locked down the camera, did our stunt work, then cleared everyone out and shot a clean plate. I used the plate to cut out all the crew and equipment hoisting me up and dropping me to the floor.The rig is simple enough. Three strong ladders are securely bound together in the form of an archway and supported by my crew. A simple pulley system is attached to a harness that I’m wearing beneath my clothing and above my hip pads. My stunt coordinator suspends me in the air for a brief moment before dropping me to the ground as I get kicked, and then drops me. Yes, I do take about a four-foot drop to my side, but notice that I am still in control of my head (as to not whiplash or slam it into the ground and concuss myself).The wire is strong Paracord. Body and waist harnesses are available fairly cheaply (and they’re safe enough for small stunts like these). For an in-depth guide to digital wire removal, check out the following video. (Using masks is great for getting rid of big details and rigs, but I found the Photoshop method discussed in the video to be best for the wires themselves.)When dealing with any kind of rig like this, make sure you test it out! Attach a weighted bag, stress test it in a way that if it does fail no one will get hurt. Test it during pre-production; test it on set. You need to be sure your rig will stand up to rigorous and repeated use before attaching a person to it.AdvancingStunts are exciting! Performing, directing, and coordinating them is genuinely thrilling and satisfying. Start small and build. Always plan safely, never take shortcuts. See how you can use the camera to make even mundane stunts look spectacular. Experiment. Use padding whenever possible. If anyone feels unsafe about the stunt, then don’t go through with it. Go back to the drawing board and come back when you know you can do it safely.Looking for more film and video production tips? Check these out.Video Tutorial: Build Your Own $50 Car-Side Camera MountInterview: Filmmaker America Young on Stunts, Directing, and PersistenceESCAPE ROOM (Short Film) — How To Composite Your Own StuntsThe Very Real Stunts of James Bond6 Tips for Filming a Thrilling Car Chase Scenelast_img read more

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CMA CGM Introduces Low Sulphur Surcharge in China

first_imgzoomIllustration; Image Courtesy: Pexels, Under CC0 License Licence French container shipping company CMA CGM is implementing low sulphur surcharge from/to the ports of Shanghai and Ningbo in China.Since October 1, 2018, the 0.5% sulphur limit is applicable to the abovementioned ports.As informed, the company will impose the new surcharge as from November 15, 2018 (date of loading in the origin ports).According to CMA CGM, the move comes in an effort “to ensure the sustainability and reliability of our (CMA CGM’s) services in a challenging environment.”For the other ports of the People’s Republic of China, the 0.5% sulphur limit will be applicable as from January 1, 2019, the company added.A few years ago, Chinese authorities decided to introduce sulphur limit for ships operating within three domestic emission control areas (ECAs). The country has been implementing in phases the low sulphur requirement for ships calling at its eleven core ports.The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 73) adopted last week the MARPOL amendment to prohibit the carriage of non-compliant fuel oil on board ships. As of January 1, 2020, ships will be banned from burning any marine fuel with a sulphur content above 0.5 pct. The exception will be ships fitted with exhaust cleaning technology, the so-called scrubbers.Related: MSC, CMA CGM Present Plans for Fuel Surchargeslast_img read more

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John Wall Eyes January Return Return To Relevance

John Wall has missed the entire wretched season so far of the Washington Wizards because of a knee injury. Hurt more has been Wall’s professional pride.The 2010 No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft hardly is mentioned among the top point guards in the league anymore, and that eats at him — and inspires him.“If you look at the list of the point guards of the future, I’m not up there,” Wall told YahooSports. “That gives more motivation to me when I get back to show the NBA what I really have to give to the league. They will respect me again. Everybody will see. I won’t do the talking. I will let my game do the talking.”Wall said based on how he has felt recently (no pain after three consecutive up-tempo workouts) that he should return to the lineup in January. He averaged 16.3 points, eight assists and 4.5 rebounds last year in the lockout-shortened season.As a rookie, he was sidelined a dozen games for knee and foot injuries, but was the MVP of the rookie vs. sophomore challenge during NBA all-star weekend. Sill, he told YahooSports that he played through injuries to not let his team down, but playing injured limited his mobility and put himself at further risk.“There is no reason to force myself back and re-injure myself and have another setback where I don’t start next season or I got to miss next season,” Wall said. “I’m just taking my time.“If I play 20 games, I just go out there and play them. I’m not giving up on my team and they’re not giving up on me. They know I’m working hard to try to get back.”Watching from the bench with a stress injury to his left patella in general and his team struggling (league-worse 3-23)  in particular has been learning for Wall, he told YahooSports.“I always love the game, but you respect the game more when you can’t play,” Wall said. “I have never been injured before seriously. I’m watching every point guard that comes in and what they’re doing and how teams are doing against my team and what I can do when I get back.“When I feel like I can run and do everything like I used to, cut, jump like I used to, run fast like I used to (I will return). And I feel like I am getting closer and closer to those steps.” read more

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