Grace Slick Licenses Song To Chick-fil-A, Gives Proceeds To LGBTQ Rights Organization

first_imgDuring the 2017 Grammys broadcast, you may have seen a new ad for notoriously ultra-religious and socially conservative fast food chain Chick-fil-A featuring cows passing out VR headsets with Starship‘s 1986 hit “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now” playing underneath. While the commercial is undoubtedly entertaining, the use of this song in a commercial by such a right-leaning corporation was surprising, given that Starship (and it’s various earlier incarnations) was a central piece of the free-loving, psychedelic San Francisco music scene during the 60s. You can view the commercial in question below:In an editorial posted by Forbes, singer Grace Slick puts to rest any head scratching and “sellout” allegations from fans with a complete explanation of her decision to allow Chick-fil-A to use her music. “Chick-fil-A pisses me off,” proclaims Slick. “The Georgia-based company has a well-documented history of funding organizations, through their philanthropic foundation WinShape, that are against gay marriage. In interviews, CEO Dan T. Cathy has critiqued gay-rights supporters who ‘have the audacity to define marriage’ and said they are bringing ‘God’s judgment” upon the nation.’ I firmly believe that men should be able to marry men, and women women. I am passionately against anyone who would try to suppress this basic human right. So my first thought when ‘Check’-fil-A came to me was, ‘F**k no!’However, Grace Slick devised a plan that would tangibly help the cause in question, rather than merely showing her ceremonial support by declining Chick-fil-A’s offer. Explains Slick, “I am donating every dime that I make from that ad to Lambda Legal, the largest national legal organization working to advance the civil rights of LGBTQ people, and everyone living with HIV. Admittedly, it’s not the millions that WinShape has given to organizations that define marriage as heterosexual. But instead of them replacing my song with someone else’s and losing this opportunity to strike back at anti-LGBTQ forces, I decided to spend the cash in direct opposition to ‘Check’-fil-A’s causes – and to make a public example of them, too. We’re going to take some of their money, and pay it back.”You can read Grace Slick’s full op-ed on the Forbes blog here.last_img read more

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Amabile receives lifetime achievement award

first_imgTeresa Amabile, a Baker Foundation Professor at Harvard Business School and the Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration Emerita, has been selected by the Organizational Behavior (OB) Division of the Academy of Management as the 2018 winner of its Lifetime Achievement Award. Established in 2005, the award recognizes senior scholars who have made exceptional contributions to the organizational behavior discipline throughout their careers.To be eligible for the award, an individual must have completed his or her Ph.D. at least 20 years ago and be an outstanding scholar who has published in the most important journals and conducted research that has had a significant impact on the field of organizational behavior. Recipients must have contributed not only through their scholarship but through their service to the field.According to the OB Division’s award committee, “To a great degree, Teresa Amabile can be considered to have ‘created’ the field of creativity within organizations as we know it today, providing both the fundamental theoretical foundations and the rigorous approach to measurement that have guided creativity research for over 30 years.“Her work has shown how creativity is a central element of human experience and also an important driver of effectiveness in organizational contexts. Her record displays a remarkable range of methods and settings, from deductive laboratory studies to inductive work conducted in organizations.“Although Professor Amabile’s contributions are remarkable,” the committee continued, “it is clear that she has also facilitated and inspired the work of many other scholars, providing an intellectual framework that has allowed for progress in many other areas by emphasizing creativity as a common concern.”Members of the award committee also lauded Amabile’s dedication to doctoral students and young scholars, noting that “her record is overflowing with accounts of her selfless approach and the passion, confidence, and inspiration she instills in young scholars. She exemplifies the type of scholar this award is meant to recognize.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Route 7 not too ‘precious’ for memorial

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I’m absolutely appalled by all of the opposition to the Holocaust memorial.Since when is Route 7, Troy-Schenectady Road, so “precious?” There’s a cemetery, strip mall and all kinds of commercial buildings along that road. And why should it be hidden? The Holocaust happened, folks, and it should be memorialized.Niskayuna is definitely not Rodeo Drive. What nonsense.PHYLLIS CHAPMANGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img

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Accelerating Success: Nadia Eke’s master plan to help athletes build professional brands

first_imgOn the field, Ghanaian triple jump athlete, Nadia Eke is fiercely competitive; a tigress that gives her absolute best to achieve success whenever and wherever has competed.That powerful drive made her African triple jump champion in 2016; then Ghana’s record holder in the event in 2019 (14.33m), even if it meant getting injured in the process.She has represented Ghana at two Commonwealth Games, two African Championships, two African Games, the Olympics once and is on course for a second bow at the global games having qualified for the Tokyo already.It’s remarkable success for the Columbia University graduate who largely spent most of her competitive years combining school with athletics.GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 10: Nadia Eke of Ghana competes in the Women’s Triple Jump final during the Athletics on day six of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games at Carrara Stadium on April 10, 2018 on the Gold Coast, Australia. (Photo by Michael Dodge/Getty Images)SAThrough her company Axxelerate, she is bringing all of that knowledge to bear in helping athletes build powerful brands beyond the sport.The 27 year old has assembled five (5) powerful minds for a free webinar dubbed “Accelerating Success:  Building Beyond the Athletic” that is aimed at “helping athletes identify their brands as athletes and leveraging on that brand to create professional opportunities beyond the sport”.Scheduled for Saturday 29th August, 2020, (18:00-19:00GMT), athletes will have the opportunity to interact in a Q and A style panel that features highly successful past and present sports men and women.The panel is made up of:Marcellus Wiley: retired NFL player, entrepreneur and host of FoxSports Speak For Yourself; Natasha Hastings: USA Olympic Gold Medalist and Founder of 400M DIVA CollectionNate Robinson: NBA Veteran and Founder of Holdat ClothingNzingha Prescod: World Champion Bronze Medalist (USA Fencing), first African-American woman to win an individual medal at the world championships and Advisory Staff at Ernst & YoungGreg Levy (Moderator): Associate Dean of Academic & Student Services and Strategic Initiatives; Director, Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law LL.M (University of Miami School of Law)“We have all been negatively impacted by this ‘new normal’— impacted financially, professionally, physically and mentally,” she said of the event.“The times, although challenging, are calling for us to innovate the way we position ourselves to ensure professional and financial security, and that’s what this event is really about.“We want to help athletes reposition themselves for professional opportunities outside of the sport.”To register for the event for free, go to www.axxelerate.infolast_img read more

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Former Mayor Callman Dies at 95

first_imgBy Rick MalwitzCharles S. CallmanRUMSON – Charles S. Callman, who served the borough of Rumson in scores of capacities, including two stints as mayor, died Monday, July 30, at his home at the age of 95, with his family at his side.“The borough was his hobby,’’ said his wife Lee Callman. “He just had this tremendous love for everything Rumson.“He loved the people, especially those whose families lived here forever and ever – the police, the firemen, the first aid squad, the people who’d lived here their whole lives,’’ Lee Callman said.In 1998, though he tried to talk the borough council out of it, the municipal courtroom at borough hall was named the Charles S. Callman Hall.However, he was more familiar to many as Chillie Callman, a nickname he got as a boy, when a classmate had trouble pronouncing Charles.Callman was born in 1917 in Bronxville, N.Y. His father, who earned degrees from Dartmouth College and MIT, taught him the value of education. Callman graduated from The Lawrenceville School and Princeton University.During World War II he worked at a munitions factory on Long Island, and when he and his wife moved to their present home in 1986, he survived a scare that Lee Callman is able to laugh at today.He discovered a suspicious shell in his belongings and called the police. Soon police and firemen arrived at his home and the shell was taken gingerly from the garage by workers in hazmat gear. “It was a dud,’’ Lee Callman said.Alex Williamson, a television producer in Los Angeles, remembered the man he called “Uncle Chillie” as someone who “loved a joke and had a mind like a steel trap.”Williamson said his father, the late George Wiliamson, considered Callman his mentor and best friend. The two were Princeton graduates and both worked in the financial industry.Some of Williamson’s fondest childhood memories were of Callman giving him a ride in one of his red English convertible sports cars. “I’m riding in the car with the man who’s the mayor and my godfather, andI feel so important.”Alex’s mother, Gay Williamson, recalled how she and her husband George often traveled with the Callmans. “I can still picture Chillie and George in a sailboat in the Barbados making up limericks,” she said.Callman retired as a vice president of Kidder, Peabody & Co. of New York. He established his first residence in Rumson in 1947, and helped shape not only the borough but the surrounding area.He was an original member of the Two Rivers Council of Mayors that included mayors from Rumson and 11 surrounding communities.Callman was elected to the council in 1958 and held the office until becoming mayor in 1962. He served his first term as mayor until 1967 and then served as chairman of the Rumson Planning Board from 1968 until Jan. 1, 1974, when he was again asked to rejoin the governing body as a councilman. He later served as mayor from 1989 until his retirement from public life in 2003.During his second tenure as mayor, Ann Rossbach served on the Rumson-Fair Haven Board of Education.“Whenever we, the board, and the mayor met, he was always asking questions about the students,” Rossbach said. “He always wanted to know about any issue, ‘Is it good for the children?’ He always wanted to know how an issue affected the taxpayer, but he was most interested in the students.”Lee Callman likened her husband’s style in public life to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. She said that he had the same blunt and honest way of telling the truth.In September 2003, the borough council adopted a “Resolution of Appreciation” to honor Callman. The resolution said his “record of public service speaks for itself. He is the most dedicated, extraordinary volunteer public servant in the history of the Borough. Chillie Callman’s dedication and love for Rumson and its residents are unequalled; his integrity, courageous leadership, intelligence, compassion and sense of humor have earned him the great respect and affection of his colleagues, the Borough employees, the volunteer Fire Department and First Aid Squad and the residents of Rumson…”Callman was a past president of the Forrestdale School PTA and an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of Rumson. He was a member of the Rumson Zoning Board of Adjustment and a longtime member of the Borough Planning Board. He was the first chairman of the Rumson Conservation Commission and was also the chairman of the Municipal Public Service Coordinating Committee, which was formed years ago to represent Rumson and seven neighboring towns in public utility and transportation matters. Callman was also the first Rumson representative to the Navesink River Munici­pality Committee, which was created to safeguard the Navesink and Shrewsbury rivers.Callman was very proud to be an honorary member of the Rumson First Aid Squad and the Oceanic Hook and Ladder Fire Company.He was a member of the Rumson Country Club, the Sea Bright Beach Club, the Sea Bright Lawn Tennis & Cricket Club, The Root Beer and Checkers Club, The Fat Men, the YMCA in Red Bank, the Rumson Ramp Club and the Pistol Club.Chillie Callman was predeceased by his parents and his first wife Portia.In addition to his wife, Callman is survived by his children, Patricia and Peter Morse, Charles S. “Chuck” Callman, Jr., Portia “Midge” Murphy, Amy Johnson Swanson and husband John, Elizabeth Ann “E.A.” Buck and husband Michael Norman, Raymond F. Johnson, III; and eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.Visitation will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 13, at the Thompson Memorial Home, 310 Broad St. Red Bank. The funeral service will be 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, a.m. at St. George’s-by-the-River Church, 7 Lincoln Ave., Rumson. Burial will be private.In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial donations be made in his memory to the First Presby­terian Church of Rumson, the Rumson EMS or to St. George’s-by-the-River Church.last_img read more

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Unique Locations for Small Weddings

first_imgVia 4545 Broad St.Red Bank 732.450.9945www.via45.com Sometimes, the smallest weddings are the hardest to arrange.Much of the preparation work must be done by the future bride and groom themselves, often without the assistance of a wedding planner or catering hall. And so much can go wrong (the food, the photographer, the band) or be overlooked (did anyone remember the ring?).But while there may be some extra work, a small wedding event also offers the wedding couple a big advantage: The ability to produce a cozy, custom-made experience, tailored to the precise tastes and preferences of the bride, groom and guests. Some of that experience can include a favorite restaurant where you might not think a wedding was a possibility.Couples planning small weddings should consider approaching the operators of restaurants where they enjoy the food or the wine list or the ambiance. They might be surprised to learn that, yes, the restaurant will provide space for a small wedding and, yes, they will serve that wonderful tortellini or swordfish dish that you adore.One of the local restaurants that will host a small wedding (with 20 to 40 guests) is Ama Ristorante at the Driftwood, Sea Bright. Ama offers a private dining room with an ocean view and a stunning mural of a Tuscan landscape.For a larger wedding, Ama will consider dedicating the main dining room as well if the event is scheduled on days other than Friday and Saturday from October through April.Another restaurant that will considerer dedicating the entire dining room to one party is Via 45, Red Bank, which does not offer a private dining room. Again, Via 45 asks couples to consider weeknights for such events.Ama Ristorante at Driftwood1485 Ocean Ave.Sea Bright 732.530.9760www.amaristorante.comlast_img read more

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