Innovative contactless water bottle filling stations unveiled in Limerick

first_imgWater station INNOVATIVE contactless water bottle filling stations has been installed in Limerick.The new bottle filling stations provide contactless, clean and safe water without the risk of touching high-use buttons that could increase the spread of infection.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Users can simply place a water bottle into the holder and the sensors will pick up on movement and activate the machine.To further reduce the potential spread of pathogens (micro-organisms that cause, or can cause, disease) the ‘no touch’ design prevents the bottle rim from coming into contact with the nozzle.The units have digital water flow meters with remote monitoring built in, which monitors the output to determine the amount of plastic water bottles, which have been prevented from entering circulation in Ireland.Four contactless drinking water fountains have been rolled out with support from Healthy Ireland Fund and Limerick European Green Leaf City 2020. The Healthy Ireland Fund is supported by the Department of Health and the Department of Children and Youth Affairs.A fifth water fountain has been installed in Athea on behalf of Athea Tidy Towns with funding from the Limerick Local Community Development Committee’s Community Enhancement Programme.The locations are:Merchant’s Quay, Limerick City – beside the gate into St Mary’s CathedralAdare LibraryCivic Buildings and Courthouse complex in KilmallockThe Square, AbbeyfealeAthea VillageMayor of Limerick City and County Cllr Michael Collins said: “Limerick City and County Council is committed to establishing a network of public drinking water fountains to help reduce plastic waste. Reducing reliance on plastic and improving water sustainability is vital as we work to combat climate change and protect our environment and oceans.“This new installation has the added benefit of playing a vital role in protecting public health during the Covid-19 period. I know it will be well used and be of benefit to the Limerick citizens and visitors.”Eileen Humphreys, Healthy Limerick Coordinator said: “I am delighted to see this project come to fruition. It is a good example of collaborative work between Limerick City and County Council, Limerick Local Community Development Committee, the Government of Ireland, Healthy Ireland Fund and Pobal.Anne Goggin, Head of the Limerick City 2020 European Green Leaf Programme said “Preventing the use of single use plastic bottles was an important element of Limerick City’s European Green Leaf programme for 2020. The #EGLA2020Limerick team was delighted to support this contactless drinking water fountain project.“I hope that we will see new public developments across Limerick city and county include this type of feature into their designs in the future. This would result in more units being rolled out throughout the city and county and further combat the use of single use plastics.”Peter Wynne, Managing Director of Ecofil said: “The team at Ecofil is delighted to be working with Limerick City and County Council in the rollout of these new contactless bottle filling stations. During the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, we temporarily decommissioned our units and worked on diversifying our product range to ensure we could continue to provide access to water in a safe way.“We believe that access to clean water in public areas is instrumental in the fight against single-use plastics. An analysis of 50 Ecofil public water stations in local authorities, conducted in 2019, found that 365,000 litres, or 730,000 bottles, are saved from landfill on an annual basis.”Helen O Donnell, Chair of Limerick City Centre Tidy Towns and Damien Ahern, Chair of Athea Tidy Towns welcomed the units and emphasised that the contactless water fountains will form part of their Tidy Towns’ applications in 2021 under the sustainability category – reducing the dependency on single use plastics.#EGLA2020 #EGLALimerick2020#HealthyLimerick#HealthyIreland WhatsApp LimerickNewsInnovative contactless water bottle filling stations unveiled in LimerickBy Meghann Scully – December 16, 2020 908 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Linkedin Email Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleSouthwest All-Stars, We Move The Needle coming to a screen near you soonNext articleFascinating insight into reaction to the Easter Rising in Newcastle West unveiled Meghann Scully center_img Print Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Facebook Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Twitter Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

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Ocean City School Board Approves New Policy for Overdose Antidote

first_imgBy Donald WittkowskiJoseph S. Clark Jr., the president of the Ocean City Board of Education, says he knows of five people who have died of a drug overdose in just the past few months.Although none of those people were local students, the possibility of drug overdoses occurring in Ocean City’s schools prompted the Board of Education to adopt a new policy Wednesday night to equip the school district with a potentially life-saving opioid antidote.“We have to be proactive,” Clark stressed.Cecilia Gallelli-Keyes, a school board member, said the policy recognizes the drug crisis in other parts of Cape May County and the possibility it could spread to Ocean City.“We don’t have a problem,” she said, referring to Ocean City. “But Cape May County has a big heroin problem. We want to prepare ourselves.”Both Clark and Gallelli-Keyes said the opioid policy has been met with widespread support in the local community.“I’m glad that we, as a district, are doing something,” Gallelli-Keyes said.The new policy, she added, is effectively “opening our eyes” to the scourge of drugs and what can be done to potentially save lives.Board of Education members Joseph Clark and Cecilia Gallelli-Keyes said the new policy is proactive.Now that the board has approved the policy, the next step calls for the Ocean City school physician to prescribe which antidote will be used for drug overdoses and to determine who will administer it, Clark said.School officials have discussed the possibility of equipping the school nurse with the antidote, but the physician still must finalize the overdose procedures, Clark explained.“This is the beginning of the process. We’re not there yet,” he said.Narcan, the brand name for the opioid antidote naloxone, is widely used by Cape May County police departments to treat overdose victims. Narcan blocks the effects of heroin or other opioids on the brain and can quickly restore breathing.During a drug forum in October, Cape May County Prosecutor Robert Taylor said heroin deaths have been declining in the county largely due to the use of Narcan by police. Overall, 60 overdose victims in the county were saved by Narcan in 2015 and another 61 through the first nine months of 2016, according to Taylor.Ocean City is following the recommendations of the New Jersey School Boards Association by adopting the opioid policy. Other school districts throughout the state have approved similar policies, Clark said.In another vote at its meeting Wednesday, the Board of Education introduced the school district’s proposed 2017-2018 budget, which calls for a slight increase in the local school tax.The $42.2 million spending plan is about $1 million higher than last year’s budget. Under the plan, the school tax rate would rise by one-tenth of a penny, resulting in an extra $5 in school taxes annually on a home assessed at $500,000.Timothy E. Kelley, school board administrator, outlined the proposed 2017-2018 budget.Timothy E. Kelley, the school board administrator, said the principal reason for the tax increase was a decline in tuition revenue from two of Ocean City’s sending districts – Upper Township and Sea Isle City – caused by their falling student population.In his budget presentation to the board, Kelley said tuition revenue is dropping to $11.7 million in 2017-2018 compared to $13.3 million in the 2016-2017 school year.To help offset the decline in tuition revenue, the district will tap about $2.1 million from its fund balance, essentially its savings account, Kelley said.School districts are required to have balanced budgets. For 2017-2018, Ocean City is receiving the same amount of state aid, about $3.8 million, as last year to help pay for its expenses.Maintenance and capital projects at Ocean City’s primary, intermediate and high schools will add to the budget. Among them, sewer repairs at the intermediate school will probably cost in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, Kelley said.The school board has scheduled a public hearing and final vote on the budget for its April 26 meeting.Jacqueline McAlister, the board’s vice president, said the budget maintains Ocean City’s high quality of education while increasing taxes by only a small amount – a feat she called “superb fiscal management. Ocean City High School last_img read more

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MLAX : HIGH AND LOW: Syracuse offense breaks through in 2nd half to avoid St. John’s upset bid

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 9, 2012 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img NEW YORK — After Jeff Lowman stymied Syracuse for nearly 40 minutes, Bobby Eilers finally cracked the code.Eilers used a crafty move to beat the St. John’s goaltender with Syracuse trailing by two goals with five minutes left in the third quarter. The senior midfielder made a sharp cut to the goal along the left side of the attacking zone, spun back toward midfield and fired a waist-high shot past Lowman.A few moments later, Eilers fired a bounce shot into right corner of the net to knot the game at five.‘(Lowman) didn’t actually stand on his head, we were putting the ball right on his stick shooting high,’ Eilers said. ‘We were persistent, we kept trying, but we realized when Coach (John) Desko said we’ve got to shoot low and away that’s when we had much better luck.’In an up-and-down game with a surprising St. John’s squad, Syracuse finally broke through. Tim Desko’s goal with 1:22 left provided the game-winning margin as the No. 6 Orange (3-1, 1-0 Big East) escaped DaSilva Memorial Field with a 9-8 win over the Red Storm (2-2, 0-1) in front of 1,779 on Saturday. Lowman was superb in goal in the first half, stopping 8-of-11 shots, but Syracuse exposed the goalie with a better offensive second half.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange began to fluster Lowman in the second half, and one major error late in the game finally undid St. John’s upset bid.With the game tied at 8-8, a Syracuse pass rolled behind the net and Lowman was clamped the ball to the ground. But SU attacks Derek Maltz and Tommy Palasek impeded the goaltender’s clear attempt and a deflection fell lazily into the stick of Desko. He caught it in one motion and dove to his left to deliver the ball low into the net with 1:22 remaining.Desko’s second goal of the game proved to be the game-winner as the crucial miscue put the stamp on Lowman’s unraveling.‘You never get rattled, whatever happens out there you got to push through it and we never give up,’ Desko said. ‘And we know we’re going to eventually come away with the win and it was good win.’On SU’s opening possession, Syracuse midfielder JoJo Marasco rang shot off the post from the left wing. And that’s where the Orange’s early struggles began.Syracuse had 10 shots in the first quarter, but only four fell on net. The Orange did jump out to an early 2-1 lead.But the Red Storm responded and picked up three straight goals to earn a 4-2 lead. And Lowman gained some momentum. Midway through the second quarter with Syracuse looking to climb even, Maltz ripped a high shot from the left wing that was blocked down outright by Lowman.One possession later, midfielder Henry Schoonmaker moved to his right and took a leaping shot from straightaway that Lowman was able to cover up. And as Lowman smothered most of the Orange’s shots, Syracuse limped into halftime down 4-3.‘I think the biggest part of it was the shooting,’ head coach John Desko said. ‘I don’t know what our shots were, but we were getting our shots. We were getting our shots and normally when we get our shots we’re well in the double figures.’But with a redefined focus on attack in the second half, the ball finally began to find the back of the net for SU. Eilers connected on two consecutive low shots to draw the Orange even at five with 2:20 remaining in the third quarter.Schoonmaker altered his approach, shooting low, and connected on a bounce shot in transition to give SU its first lead since the first quarter. Maltz added another to give the Orange its biggest lead of the game as it looked as if the Orange’s momentum would carry it to victory.St. John’s responded — as it had all game long — with two consecutive goals to tie the game at 8-8 with 3:57 remaining in regulation.But after pestering Lowman the entire second half with a different approach, Desko notched the game-winner.‘To come out of here with a win, 9-8 against a very good St. John’s team, it just helps us out,’ Maltz said. ‘A tight game down the road we’re just going to look back on this and remember how to fight through it and come out with the win.’[email protected]last_img read more

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Mason City’s mayor declares state of emergency, City Hall closed to public

first_imgMASON CITY — Mason City’s mayor has declared a state of emergency in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Bill Schickel through proclamation is prohibiting gatherings of 10 or more people on public property or public right-of-way effective at midnight this morning, and he strongly suggests private gatherings of 10 or more people on private property should be avoided. Schickel says City Hall and other municipal buildings will be closed to the public until further notice.  “ The majority of our regular services will be operating and the staff will be there to answer the telephone, answer your questions. Sanitation will continue to operate. Public transit will continue to operate. All of our safety services, our  emergency services will continue to operate. You can pay your utility bill, your water bill, you can pay that online, or you can drop by the drop box that’s located in front of City Hall to do that. The regular phone number at City Hall we will be answering.” Schickel says the city’s transit system will continue to operate and proper measures are being taken to make sure buses are cleaned regularly.  “It’s a critical service for so many people here in Mason City, especially getting to work and for other things. The transit system is being disinfected on a regular basis and we encourage you when you use the public transit to keep in mind social distancing as well.” Schickel thanked city and healthcare workers who can’t stay home during this crisis.  “A special thanks to our workers, particularly our healthcare workers and I think of our sanitation workers, our emergency workers. These are workers that can’t stay home. We’re encouraging you to stay home if you possibly can, but we understand that some workers cannot, and we owe a special debt of gratitude for our sanitation workers and all those that are sacrificing so much for all of us.” Schickel says social distancing in the community will help prevent the spread of coronavirus and that’s why he made the declaration prohibiting large gatherings.  “We know that good information can save lives and bad information can be deadly, and so that’s why it’s so important that we stay in touch. It’s also true that individual decisions matter. What all of us do can make a huge difference in keeping our community and indeed keeping our state healthy. I very much appreciate all of the partners that have work so hard to get the message out, particularly about social distancing, because that can have a huge beneficial health impact on our community.” For any questions regarding City of Mason City services, you can call City Hall at 421-3600.last_img read more

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