Kirk Brown turns Digicel Imagine Run 5K into own street party

first_img JUNIOR TEAM Llori Sharpe, only 16 years old, but distinguished as a junior Team Jamaica triathlete, crossed the finish line at 21 minutes and 47 seconds, ahead of her closest rival, 14-year-old Chantay Chamberlain. Road race veteran Arieta Martin, who is 36 years old, was third in 22 minutes and 48 seconds. “My objective was to make sure that I got out ahead of the pack that usually forms early in the race and then get into my rhythm, increase my pace and cross the finish line,” said Sharpe. The win, she says, gives her confidence to go farther as a triathlete. There were over 13,500 participants, the largest number ever for the fast-growing event. In the coming weeks, Digicel will announce the total sum raised from the 5K and will hand over the monies to the nine beneficiaries, namely, the Jamaica Autism Support Association, Jamaica Down’s Syndrome Foundation, Early Stimulation Plus, Jamaica Association on Intellectual Disabilities, Mustard Seed Communities, Special Olympics Jamaica, Jamaica Paralympic Association, Abilities Foundation and the Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf/Deaf Can Coffee. The Digicel Imagine Night Run was sponsored by Mello FM, Marksman, PayPak, Jamaica Producers Group, Urban Development Corporation, Express Fitness, Logo Stitch, Main Event, National Outdoor Advertising, Dairy Industries Jamaica Ltd., Honeybun, Innovative Signs, Jamaica Producers, ARRC Media, ProComm, The Lab, Courts Ready Cash, Courts Optical, Running Events, Urban Development Corporation, Pure National Ice, Logostitch, Gatorade and KSAC. The media sponsors are Bess FM, Irie FM, Zip FM, Loop, Nationwide News Network, Love, Suncity, Sportsmax, and members of the RJR Group, including Power 106, Hitz 92 and TVJ. KIRK BROWN is turning the Digicel Imagine 5K Night Run into his own little spectacle. For the third time, Brown proved to be master of the streets and alleyways of downtown Kingston and in cool conditions on a wet road, he decimated the field to take the men’s title in the fifth staging of the annual event, which raises funds for ‘special needs’. The 29-year-old, who also won last year, was 11 seconds faster than 23-year-old Oshane Archibald, the second-place finisher. Dwayne Graham clocked a respectable 17 minutes and three seconds to take third place in the men’s category. “My aim was to come out here and win it another year. The wet roads made it a bit more challenging, but I’m glad I made it though.” The women’s segment was dominated by teenagers, two of whom placed among the top three.last_img read more

Read More →

NGOs: Why Now?

first_imgThe Liberian president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, in her State of the Nation address Monday, laid out new guidelines for non-governmental organizations working in the country.The president calculated that of the 997 NGOs working in the country, 87 percent were local or national NGOs, while the other 13 percent were international.Previously, she surmised, the role of NGOs focused on humanitarian assistance and development work.“More recently,” she observed, “the emphasis has been on democracy and governance; human rights; environment and natural resources.  In these latter functions, some NGOs have sought to become super-national bodies challenging national sovereignty even as they themselves lack national and international governance status and rules in transparency and accessibility.”The president then immediately pivoted into a solution to this problem, as it were – more “transparency and accountability by NGOs in their delivery of services to our people.”Many Liberians welcomed the news, but from a different perspective. Comments posted on social media networks suggested that for the number of NGOs present in the country, not much could be said for development. As such, many felt NGOs did need greater transparency and accountability. One commenter cited the case of an NGO owner who had become wealthy (mansion and all) thanks to his duty-free and tax-free privileges. Another stated that top government officials were involved in the NGO ‘business’.Looking at the president’s statement, however, it would seem as though it was not directed at non-performing NGOs, but at NGOs whom she said had taken on “super-national status” and invaded Liberia’s sovereignty. It would seem as though when NGOs were merely posing and not doing much, there was no problem. It was when they started to challenge government policies that the need arose for greater “transparency and accountability”.This is a problem, and this administration needs to be careful – this could backfire. Have we forgotten that free speech is a universal human right this administration has prided itself in protecting? Why are the rules different for NGOs? If the president had gone after newspapers in this regard, we’d all be screaming bloody murder over new rules that smack of retribution for dissent!The message to NGOs here seems to be, “Do your job (or don’t) but keep your mouth shut and out of our business.”The president is right in observing that humanitarian and development work has traditionally described the work of NGOs – except that her scope is limited. What is humanitarian work if it does not stand up for the rights of others who cannot stand up for themselves? NGOs are typically as close to the ground as they can get – all over the rural areas talking to the people. As such, they are often privy to first-hand information. If rural dwellers are losing their tribal lands to multi-national corporations, they are aware. How humanitarian would it be not to sound the alarm on matters that contribute to the underdevelopment of the marginalized and powerless? Indeed, perhaps the nature of humanitarian and development work has changed with the times!But are these rules really new? Yes and no, but more no than yes. The Daily Observer has in its possession a copy of the GOL’s National Policy on Non-Governmental Organizations in Liberia. This document came into effect June 15, 2008 and was authored by Dr. Toga McIntosh, then Minister of Planning and Economic Affairs.It reads, among other things, that “As NGOs are essential partners in identifying, defining and developing policies and driving development in Liberia, (emphasis added) this policy seeks to address the above concerns and ensure that an enabling environment is created for the smooth operation of NGOs, as well as ensuring human development. It is an integral part of the ongoing reform exercise. The over-riding and long-term objective is to provide better and more effective service to the Liberian people and nation.”Section 9.1 also states that “All vehicles owned by an accredited NGO shall bear NGO license plates and, where feasible (emphasis added), shall also bear the NGO’s logo.”The new version of Section 9.1 according to the president, however, is that “all vehicles owned by NGOs should be registered in the name of the organization and be clearly marked with the name and logo of the organization or face impoundment”. Why? What happened to “where feasible”? Is it so that they do not go where they are not welcomed?Where has this document been anyway since 2008? Was it not necessary until NGOs became interested in democracy and governance, human rights, environment and natural resources?Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

Max Verstappen Stripped of Mexican Grand Prix Pole, Hands Lewis Hamilton Sixth Title Boost

first_imgMexico City: Max Verstappen was given a three-place grid penalty and stripped of pole position at the Mexican Grand Prix late Saturday after race stewards ruled he failed to slow for a yellow flag following a dramatic crash which saw Valtteri Bottas bury his Mercedes into a trackside barrier.The Red Bull driver’s penalty means that Charles Leclerc of Ferrari was promoted to pole position ahead of team-mate Sebastian Vettel with world champion-elect Lewis Hamilton moved up to third from fourth. The Dutchman, who will start on the second row alongside Hamilton, was also handed two penalty points on his licence after dismissing concerns for the sport’s regulations during a news conference.Verstappen, the winner in Mexico in 2017 and 2018, was on provisional pole when Bottas crashed heavily in his Mercedes at the final corner of his last run in Q3.He had no need to improve his lap time, as his rivals had failed to beat his first attempt, but sped on.He told reporters that he saw Bottas’s crashed car at the final corner and did not back off, thus setting a new record fastest lap as he improved.Verstappen, the author of his own downfall, said: “I think we know what we are doing otherwise we wouldn’t be driving an F1 car.”It’s qualifying and you go for it. If they want to delete the lap, then delete the lap…..”The stewards said Verstappen had “admitted that he was aware that car 77 (Bottas) crashed and did see the car on the left hand side of the track, but was not aware of the waved yellow flag.””He admitted not reducing his speed in the yellow sector,” the stewards added.’I HAD TO RISK IT'”Taking into account all the available evidence and the statement from the driver the stewards impose a drop of three grid positions and two penalty points.”Red Bull boss Christian Horner said it was “a great shame” that the flamboyant Verstappen had been penalised.”Max put in a phenomenal performance throughout qualifying. He was quickest in Q1, second quickest in Q2 and quickest in Q3 to achieve his second pole position of the season,” said Horner.”It is a great shame that Max has lost pole position.”Verstappen’s demotion and Bottas’s crash boosted Hamilton’s hopes of clinching his sixth drivers’ world title in Sunday’s race by outscoring his Mercedes team-mate by 14 points.”I knew that I had to risk it in the last run to gain positions, so I tried to squeeze everything out of the car,” said Bottas.”The lap was good until the last corner where I went a bit wide on the exit on the dusty part of the track and that’s where I lost it and hit the wall.”I’m all okay, but I’ve unfortunately given the boys in the garage some extra work to do tonight. Hopefully we can avoid taking any penalties for tomorrow. It’s annoying because looking at the times, I think I had a chance at qualifying third.”Mercedes team chief Toto Wolff said he feared for the implications of the crash in Sunday’s shake-up.”The car took a bit of a beating,” said Woolf.”We’re assessing the damage at the moment and hope that we don’t have to change any parts that would result in a grid penalty.”Hamilton had earlier admitted he thought third place on the grid was possible before Bottas’s accident.”The last sector went to pot (when it was controlled by double yellow flags) so that was it,” said the five-time champion.”Generally, I was quite happy with today. I knew it would be difficult, but I have a fighting position and I am going to give it everything.” Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. Charles Leclercferrariformula onelewis hamilton First Published: October 27, 2019, 3:03 PM ISTlast_img read more

Read More →