Garrott joins Blue Steel Records

first_img By The Penny Hoarder The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Published 10:00 pm Thursday, August 20, 2009 Sponsored Content Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Garrott’s new single tells the tale of a sassy, spunky youn woman who is “just plain” in love.“This isn’t your typical girlie tune,” Garrott said.“I think this sums me up in a relationship. I might not want to admit it but, if I’m gonna fall, I’m gonna fall hard. If you’re looking for sappy love songs, you won’t find them here.” Print Article Book Nook to reopen Garrott joins Blue Steel Records Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By Jaine Treadwell She appeared on stages from the beaches of the Florida Panhandle to Mississippi.It was Garrott’s stage show that caught the attention of Blue Steel Records.“Anna Garrott commands attention with her voice and effervescence,” said Steve Pope, Blue Steel CEO.“‘What a Way to Go’ is a great overall representation of her music. We’re so lucky to have her on the label.”Following the single release and a scheduled radio promotion tour, Garrott will continue her performance schedule and record the followup to her 2008 self-released independent project, “Only Time Will Tell.”Garrott now makes her home in Nashville where she is furthering her career in country music.She is the daughter of Steve and Priscilla Garrott of Troy. Skip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy’s Anna Garrott is the first female recording artist on the roster of Nashville’s Blue Steel Records.Garrott is set to release her first single, “What a Way to Go” on country radio on Sept. 8.Blue Steel is promoting its leading lady as a songstress with a powerful voice that lives up to the description, “the girl next door who rocks.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author You Might Like Pandemic panic Troy City Schools Superintendent Linda Felton-Smith isn’t sure if it’s a record-high, but more than 100 students were absent at… read more Latest Stories Blue Steel bills Garrott as a country performer and songwrither whose musical makeup highlights a touch of Patsy Cline tradition and a brush of Janis Joplin bohemia.“Anna Garrott’s music chronicles every sentiment — from tender life moments to getting over a broken heart — with bittersweet spirit.”Garrott was a marketing major at Troy University.She literally sang her way through college. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Guardian ad litem program lost in Art. V funding shuffle

first_img April 15, 2004 Managing Editor Regular News Guardian ad litem program lost in Art. V funding shuffle Guardian ad litem program lost in Art. V funding shufflecenter_img Mark D. Killian Managing Editor The state’s guardian ad litem program needs $7.5 million more than the about $20 million already in the House and Senate budget plans to ensure it can continue to represent abused, abandoned, and neglected children at current levels.That’s the dire message Angela Orkin, executive director of the Statewide GAL Office, is telling anyone who will listen.Children’s advocates see a potential crisis and are lending their voices to the cause.“If the state doesn’t find a way to replace the lost money, a large percentage of the most vulnerable children won’t have representation at all,” said Gerard Glynn, executive director of Children First!“The effects on the kids will be enormous,” said Glynn, noting there would be an increased risk of more sexual abuse, the development of mental problems, and delinquent behaviors.Longtime child advocate Jack Levine said Florida’s GAL program is a national model for how to recruit and supervise citizens who volunteer as guardians ad litem, and it would be a shame if that system is undermined by a lack of funding.“They cannot do their job unless they are monitored, managed, trained, and supervised by quality professionals because of the vulnerability of these children,” said Levine, president of Advocacy Resources. “Our concern is. . . the core of supervision and oversite that needs to be done by trained professionals may suffer.”Levine said it would be unfortunate if the GAL program gets lost in the Revision 7, Art. V. funding transition.“I would hate for any part of it to be dissolved,” he said.Orkin said because of the transfer out of the court system, the GAL program stands to lose approximately $6 million in county support.“This includes rent, expenses, and 54 and one-half GAL staff positions,” Orkin said.Orkin said the GAL program also lost all its administrative support in the transfer from the court system to the Justice Administrative Commission in the executive branch, and the state so far has not provided “one single position” for the state office to take over those functions.“We estimate that $1.5 million is needed to fund the administrative functions and to continue representation at current levels,” said Orkin, noting that right now only about 40 percent of all foster kids have guardians, who serve as a voice for children in dependency proceedings.“If this funding is not provided, we will not be able to continue representing as many children.”Orkin said another $500,000 is needed for representation in Orange County because the Orange County Bar lost state money when a pilot guardian project there was eliminated.Orkin said both House and Senate leaders say they are continuing to work on the issue, “but we are concerned that as quickly as the budget is moving that we are going to get left out in the cold.”Orkin said all the House has set aside for the program is funds for the continuation budget, which includes none of the $7.5 million needed to maintain current levels of service, but did include the half million for Orange County.“We are about $7 million short in the House,” Orkin said. “On the Senate side, they initially just included our continuation budget, but Sen. [Rod] Smith, [D-Gainesville] — who I’m working closely with — included another million as a place- holder to continue looking at our program.”Orkin said the program also is keeping in contact with the counties to encourage them to continue at least funding some of the GAL program expenses, but most are unwilling to make any kind of commitment until the legislative session closes.“They would like the state to pick up everything,” Orkin said. “We are really caught in the middle between the legislature and the counties at this point, as to who is going to make sure we are held harmless in the implementation of Art. V.”Guardians ad litem serve a vital role in all 67 counties by looking out for the best interest of foster kids in dependancy court, said Howard Talenfeld, president of Florida’s Children First!, in urging lawmakers not to let the program become lost in the Art. V funding transition.“We want to encourage lawmakers to find a way to keep the guardian ad litem program fully funded so it can at least maintain the current level of service,” Talenfeld said.“If we leave this session, and we take this massive step back and discharge thousands and thousands of cases, we are just going to turn around and come back next session and ask for the funds to get us back up closer to 100 percent,” Orkin said. “We need all the support we can get before the legislature and the counties.”last_img read more

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No policy breach made by Indonesian student accused of sexual abuse: University of Melbourne

first_imgThe University of Melbourne in Australia has found that Ibrahim Malik, a student accused of sexual assault by dozens of women in Indonesia, did not breach any of the university’s policies, the university said in a statement.The university had appointed an external investigator to examine the allegations against Ibrahim after a woman submitted a formal complaint under the University’s Student Conduct Policy process and a second woman made similar accusations against him but did not make a formal report.“An externally appointed independent investigator has found that a current University of Melbourne student did not breach any university policies or code of conduct and there was insufficient evidence that he acted unlawfully, following harassment allegations being made against the student that date back to 2018 and 2019,” a representative of the university said in a statement via email to The Jakarta Post on Friday. “The allegations did not involve any physical contact.”Read also: ‘Zero tolerance’: Australian university, govt ‘aware’ of sexual abuse allegations against studentThe two women have accused Ibrahim of sexually harassing them in Melbourne, and dozens more in Indonesia have made similar allegations.The statement also said that the university had informed Ibrahim and his accuser about the result of the investigation, as well as Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFA). “The university is committed to ensuring that all of its campuses are places where students, staff and visitors are safe and are treated with absolute respect and courtesy,” the representative said, adding that it would thoroughly investigate any sexual harassment report.Read also: Pressure mounts for Australia to cancel scholarship of student accused of sexual abuseIbrahim, who graduated from Yogyakarta’s Indonesian Islamic University (UII) school of architecture, is currently studying for a master’s degree at the University of Melbourne under a prestigious scholarship. He was at the center of sexual abuse allegations raised by at least 30 female UII students who reported him to the Yogyakarta Legal Aid Institute.Separately, UII spokeswoman Ratna Permata Sari said Ibrahim’s honorary student title had been stripped. “As of now, we are still focusing on providing legal and psychological assistance to his victims,” Ratna said.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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