Junior camps coming back – Dr Blake

first_imgWith the World Junior Championships coming in July, athletics chief Warren Blake is promising that junior team training camps will be held this year. Blake, the president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), made the promise as he evaluated Jamaica’s performance at last year’s World Youth Championships. Jamaica won just one medal at the event. Blake said that was cause for concern. That single medal was golden, thanks to a fine performance by Christopher Taylor. While that was excellent, the modest team medal count was the worst by a Jamaican World Youth squad. “That is a bit of a concern for us,” he said candidly, “and this year we will be making sure that we have junior camps.” Such camps were standard fare up to 2004. However, the JAAA president said the unavailability of the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport prevented staging one last year. Now the college has a new track and has seen repairs to important facilities there. NO EXCUSE “We will really have no excuse not to have a camp at G.C. Foster this year,” Blake asserted. A three-day camp actually was held to prepare Jamaica’s team to last year’s Pan-American Junior Championships. In former years, however, camps held at G.C. Foster College were staged on weekends during the summer term and on weekdays once the school year was completed. At the previous World Youth Championships, in 2013, Jamaica was outstanding with six gold medals. Some members of that team, including World Youth 110 metres hurdles champion Jaheel Hyde, are eligible for the 2016 World Junior Championships. The host city for the meet is yet to be finalised, but action will begin on July 19.last_img read more

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Instant Galaxies?

first_imgThe Hubble Space Telescope, with its Advanced Camera for Surveys, has taken a peek at the most distant galaxy clusters ever seen.  The astronomers found “embryonic” galaxies in a “proto-cluster” of galaxies, named TN J1338-1942, that they estimate formed a mere 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang.  This find has been reported in the Jan. 1 issue of Nature.1    The same astronomers had earlier found a cluster named RDCS 1252 that, by 5 billion years after the Big Bang, looked already mature.  The Hubble ACS was used to image the two clusters to study their evolution.  One of the astronomers, John Blakeslee (Johns Hopkins University) remarked, according to the Hubble press release, “Until recently people didn’t think that clusters existed when the universe was only about 5 billion years old.”  Another co-author of the paper, George Miley (Leiden University, Netherlands) added, “until recently astronomers thought it was almost impossible to find clusters that existed 8 billion years ago.”  The new finding pushes the date of early galaxy and cluster formation even further back, to less than 10% the assumed age of the universe.    The newly-discovered cluster RDCS 1252, is virtually indistinguishable from later galaxy clusters.  The Hubble press release states:“The cluster RDCS 1252 looks like a present-day cluster,” said Marc Postman of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., and co-author of both research papers.  “In fact, if you were to put it next to a present-day cluster, you wouldn’t know which is which.”The proto-cluster TN J1338 has a dominant galaxy that appears to be “producing spectacular radio-emitting jets, fueled by a supermassive black hole deep within the galaxy’s nucleus.”  The cluster RD1252 may have thousands of member galaxies, of which only a few are detectable at visible wavelengths.Miley et al., “A large population of ‘Lyman-break’ galaxies in a protocluster at redshift z=4.1,” Nature 427, 47 – 50 (01 January 2004); doi:10.1038/nature02125.Observations such as these are on the bleeding edge of the possible, so one must be cautious interpreting the results.  Sweeping aside the embedded assumptions about ages and evolutionary histories, there is nothing in these latest images to encourage old gradualistic cosmologies, and much to discourage them.  The lumpiness problem in cosmology (i.e., too much structure too soon) has been a theoretical challenge for decades.  Here is the lumpiness problem intensified.  Not long after the origin of the universe, whenever that was, galaxies seem to be already mature enough to have black holes, heavy elements and grandchildren.  This latest finding is another in a continuing trend of observations that show almost instantaneous structure from an assumed smooth beginning.    Hear the astronomers’ admissions.  No one thought it was even possible to have so much structure so early.  Not long ago, even an 8 billion year old cluster would have been thought impossible, and now 1.5 billion?  How far can you stretch a theory before it breaks?    A similar situation is found in the fossil record, and in the observed complexity of the most “primitive” life on Earth.  What is the common denominator in these three predicaments?  Naturalistic philosophy: the belief that our universe is just unguided matter in motion.  It’s not working.  The Cambrian explosion in paleontology, the discovery of advanced molecular machines in bacteria, and the discovery of mature stars in the early universe were not predicted by evolutionary philosophers, and effectively falsify their assumptions.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Digg Sees the Light of Profitability at the End of the Startup Tunnel

first_imgFacebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts jolie odellcenter_img The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#Social Bookmarking#web Digg CEO Jay Adelson told FOX Business tonight that ever since rolling out Digg Ads, the social link-sharing service has been making money and that profitability is right around the corner.Although advertising continues to be the only seemingly reliable model for monetizing content-centric websites, Adelson reports that click-through rates are higher than expected. That being said, typical rates for online advertising are generally abysmal, so if Digg’s ads are working better than most, good for them, and let’s all study their model. Read – and watch – for the rest of the story on how Digg has grown and will continue to expand and monetize.The FOX interviewer asked Adelson if micropayments were considered as a monetization option, “I think that micropayments is interesting,” he replied. “I think that if it works though – the level that it’s going to work is between somebody like Digg and the newspaper, as opposed to necessarly expecting that consumer to subscribe to some sort of micropayment system.”This sort of talk would surely come as good news to Rupert Murdoch, who was referenced in the interview and has stated plans to charge search engines – and perhaps aggregators – that index and share snippets of the relevant, timely, and expensive content that traditional news outlets still struggle to integrate with modern Internet-enabled user behavior.What about selling anonymized, aggregate user data? Adelson says he doesn’t want to sell that information unless users are generally cool with the idea. “I think that users are pretty sensitive now; they’re pretty savvy and they understand the idea that they have to be private.” But data on trends and user attention – data that would be highly valuable for old media to have and that might actually contribute to a better user experience – might be more in line with what Digg execs are willing and able to sell.And what about the possibility of an IPO? Hold onto your hats, day traders. Adelson says that, while he feels he owes it to investors and employees to “go public at some point,” he’s waiting for two factors: A valuation he likes and the day that Digg needs “hundreds of millions of dollars for something.” In other words, we’re not shaking the quarters out of our piggy banks just yet.So, what is coming next for Digg? It seems the company is planning to follow in Twitter’s footsteps and release international versions of the site. “About 40% of our traffic comes from international, but we have no other languages on Digg right now, so why not go there,” said Adelson.Check out the whole interview below:last_img read more

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