‘Healthcare Not Wealthcare!’: Disability rights activists arrested

first_imgPeople with disabilities, caregivers and friends protest life-threatening health care cuts outside the U.S. Senate Office on June 22.“Healthcare not Wealthcare” was a sign left behind at the die-in protest on June 22 inside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office in Washington, D.C., by members of ADAPT, a disability rights organization.  The group was protesting the Republicans’ “rewrite” of the Affordable Care Act.Over 60 ADAPT members came from across the country to fight for their freedom. If the proposed $834 billion cut in Medicaid occurs, many people who are disabled and elderly will die or be warehoused in institutions.Some 43 activists were arrested during the protest. U.S. Capitol Police picked them up off their wheelchairs, dumped some people unceremoniously on the ground, and then carted them outside to be arrested.In front of McConnell’s office, five Capitol police lifted 29-year-old Stephanie Woodward off her wheelchair.  She didn’t go quietly, but shouted, “No cuts to Medicaid!” as she was carried outside. Woodward is an ADAPT member from Rochester, N.Y.“I was born with spina bifida in 1988,” Woodward told the Huffington Post.  “It wasn’t easy for my folks, my mother, a hairdresser, and my father, an electrician, to get me the health care and multiple surgeries I needed.”  She has since graduated from law school. Now she has private insurance, but says, “Without Medicaid, I would not be here.” (June 23)Save Medicaid!The same article tells of ADAPT member Laura Halvorson, a 33-year-old Dallas native, who has muscular dystrophy and reluctantly decided not to resist when Capitol police told her to move along. Resisting could have damaged the breathing apparatus attached to her chair, creating  a life-threatening situation.Halvorson requires help with chores like bathing and cooking, so she is trying to obtain a personal care attendant through a Medicaid waiver  program. If she can’t get one, she would be forced to live in an institution at twice the cost of home care, a point stressed by protesters.Speaking on the June 23 MSNBC show “The Last Word,” Karen Clay characterized this ACA “rewrite” as a decimation: “I cried watching the police carry the disabled activists. What kind of country are we? I was concerned for the safety of the people the police were handling. You need training to know how to handle people who ride in chairs. Their muscles have atrophied and their bones are not used to carrying weight.”In the interview, Clay talked about her son, Mike Phillips, who has spinal muscular atrophy, is confined to bed, and manipulates a computer to communicate. With a Medicaid waiver he has a personal care assistant who takes him to the movies, Starbucks or out to dinner with friends. “I’m not Ryan Gosling” he quipped, “but I live a good life.”Medicaid provides essential life support. The program pays home care attendants who provide services needed for daily living, like cooking,  bathing and dressing for work. It enables people with disabilities to have access to durable goods, such as wheelchairs and oxygen tanks, and to live as normal a life as possible in the community, to work and to raise families.  These things would be impossible without the assistance and necessities jeopardized by this inhumane bill.To add insult to injury, the funds slashed from Medicaid would be used to subsidize tax cuts for the wealthy 1% —  “wealthcare” as the protesters claim. Filling in the gaps would be left to the states; many won’t do it or do not have the money to do so.The bill was drafted in secret. McConnell has been planning to rush the bill through before the Senate’s July 4 recess. (See editorial, page 10.)But nobody is waiting to see how the Senate votes. Spontaneous protests are popping up opposing the bill. Planned Parenthood, which would be defunded under the bill, called a demonstration for June 27. Their email read, “This is not a drill. We’re in the fight for our lives.”ADAPT’s activismADAPT members are fighting hard because their lives and freedom depend on it. They organized actions at senators’ offices across the country on June 19, 20 and 21, in addition to the Washington protest which made news, even abroad.Mike Oxford, an ADAPT organizer in Kansas, telling this writer of the strong bond that exists between people with disabilities and their caregiver workers, stressed that the organization campaigns for higher wages for them. They succeeded in Kansas where their hourly pay was raised to $10.ADAPT got its start in Denver in July 1978, fighting for the right to ride city buses. Then, 25 activists argued that as taxpayers they had a right to travel on the local buses they paid for. Carrying placards which read, “Taxation without Transportation,” they circled the buses and sat down for three days, preventing traffic from moving. At night, they got off their wheelchairs and lay down in the street to sleep.It took five years and more demonstrations, but ADAPT finally got wheelchair-accessible buses. They did it with humor; their banner read “[We want] to go boldly where everybody else has gone before.” That protest sparked similar demonstrations across the country.Mary P. Kaessinger is a wheelchair user.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Lawmaker introduces ‘anti-red flag’ bill in Georgia to combat gun control proposals

first_imgKameleon007/iStock(ATLANTA) — A legal fight could be brewing in Georgia after a General Assembly member introduced a measure to restrict any potential “red-flag” gun laws from being enacted.The bill’s sponsor, Republican state Rep. Ken Pullin, is calling the measure the “Anti-Red Flag — Second Amendment Conservation Act.” It comes as the state and Congress consider legislation allowing judges to empower law enforcement to remove guns from individuals deemed a threat to themselves or others.Pullin’s bill, which has six co-sponsors, would make it illegal to enforce those laws in Georgia, establishing a maximum penalty of three years in prison and a $5,000 fine.“It is the responsibility of the General Assembly to protect the people of Georgia when unconstitutional legislation is passed and signed into law, or executive orders are issued by the United States Federal Government that infringes upon or interferes with people’s preexisting rights and liberties guaranteed by the United States Constitution,” reads the text of the bill, which was introduced Monday.Georgia state Rep. Matthew Wilson, a Democrat, last year introduced a red-flag bill that would have allowed family members or law enforcement officers to petition a judge to remove guns from potentially dangerous individuals — people who’ve made explicit threats, have mental health issues or have inflicted self harm. That bill also had six co-sponsors.Pullin’s office didn’t immediately return a request for comment from ABC News. He told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution he was unsure if his bill would pass, but he wanted to send a message and push back against red-flag proposals.Jonathan Lowy, chief legal counsel for the Brady Campaign, called Pullin’s bill one of the most outrageous pieces of legislation he’s ever seen.“It would put law enforcement officers in a position where they would either have to neglect to do the job they are sworn to do, or go into prison,” he said.Lowy, who’s led lawsuits against anti-gun control measures, said he would be keeping an eye on the Georgia bills and would not rule out legal action if Pullin’s bill were enacted with its current language.Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have passed red-flag laws amid growing calls to curb mass shootings. In Florida, authorities removed 2,227 guns from individuals from March 2018, when the state’s red-flag law was enacted, to July 2019, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.Legislation in Congress to enact nationwide red-flag laws has stalled recently, even with bipartisan support for such measures previously. In August, President Donald Trump expressed support for such laws.At the same time, several American towns, particularly in Virginia, declare themselves “Second Amendment sanctuaries,” where they have declared to oppose state and federal laws that would limit the sale and ownership of guns.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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October 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actions

first_img October 15, 2003 Regular News T he Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended 15 attorneys, disbarred one, reprimanded two, and extended the probation of one.The following lawyers are disciplined: Damon Evan Amedeo, 3360 S. Ocean Road, Palm Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days from July 22 following an August 1 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) On October 2, 2003, Amedeo was charged with distributing cocaine to a person under the age of 21, a felony, and was sentenced to 216 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1226) Bradford Jon Beilly, 400 S.E. 19th St., Ft. Lauderdale, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Beilly entered a business transaction with a client; failed to provide competent representation to a client; and used information relating to the representation of a former client. (Case no. SC02-2651) Rendell Frederick Brown, 319 Clematis St., Ste. 217, West Palm Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. Upon his reinstatement, Brown shall commence serving a two-year probation. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) Brown failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; neglected to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation; charged or collected excessive fees; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-152) Virginia B. Chosed, 14151 98th Court, Miami, probation extended until August 1, 2004, following an August 18 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Chosed failed to comply with her rehabilitation contract with Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc., which was a condition of her court ordered probation in case no. SC03-646. (Case no. SC00-918) Mark Charles Dabold, 5401 S. Kirkman Road, Ste. 310, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 28 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Dabold failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-406) Mitchell Denker, P.O. Box 999, Summerfield, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days from August 5 following an August 14 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1975) On July 14, Denker was adjudicated guilty in Vermont on two counts of transporting monetary instruments and perjury, both felonies. Denker was sentenced to serve five months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1298) Michael Wilson Dugger, 1017 Thomasville Road, Ste. A, Tallahassee, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1970) Dugger failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter. (Case no. SC02-2623) Jose L. DelCastillo-Salamanca, 255 Main St., Floor 2, Hartford, CT., suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) DelCastillo-Salamanca failed to competently and diligently represent a client and failed to respond to the Bar during its investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC01-1696) Steven K. Grover, 868 99th Ave., N., Ste. 1, Naples, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1997) Grover failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-163). Jordan B. Harlem, 3050 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 600, Miami, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 28 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 2000) Harlem failed to designate an official Bar name, mailing address, and business telephone number; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; charged or collected excessive fees; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-450) Shawn M. Jordan, 2820 N.W. 135th St., Opa Locka, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) Jordan failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2566) Jeffrey David Knowlton, 500 N. Harbor City Blvd., Melbourne, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) Among several Bar violations, Knowlton failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to respond, in writing, to official Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; and failed to take reasonable steps to protect a client’s interests upon misrepresentation. (Case nos. SC02-2076, SC02-2638, SC03-407) Terrence Leon Laster, P.O. Box 822932, Dallas, TX, suspended by emergency from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following an August 19 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) A reconstruction of Laster’s trust accounts revealed a large shortage and failed to provide a current address and business telephone number to The Florida Bar. (Case no. SC03-1402) Joey Dean Oquist, 1135 9th St., N., St. Petersburg, suspended from practicing law in Florida for seven days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Oquist failed to keep a client reasonably informed and failed to supervise a subordinate. (Case no. SC02-2004) L. Byron Reid, P.O. Box 607, Panama City, suspended from practicing law in Florida for three years, effective immediately following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1992) Reid violated several Bar rules including involvement in misconduct, minor misconduct, and criminal misconduct; knowingly made a false statement to The Florida Bar; misrepresentation; and conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC02-2079) Reydel Santos, P.O. Box 5000, Yazoo City, MS., suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following an August 14 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Santos was adjudicated guilty in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida on Nov. 3, 2000, for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession with intent to distribute cocaine, both felonies. Santos was sentenced to serve 121 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1316) Billy Michael Thomas, 997 S. Wickham Road, W. Melbourne, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1992) Thomas failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2125) Henry Thompson, 14815 S.W. 107th Ave., Miami, suspended from the practice of law for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1971) Among several Bar violations, Thompson filed nonmeritorious claims and contentions; failed to act fairly to opposing party and counsel; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC02-2717) Alexander Zouzoulas, 2070 Saint George Ave., Winter Park, suspended from practicing law in Florida for six months, effective retroactive to January 4 following an August 21 court order. Zouzoulas is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Zouzoulas failed to comply with probationary terms in Case no. SC02-2042. Among terms of his probation, Zouloulas must contact Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. (Case no. SC02-2042) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. October 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actionslast_img read more

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Thaler writes Congress on retailers’ failing grade on data security

first_imgNAFCU Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler urged the leaders of the House and Senate to review a report that showed four out of every five global retailers – 80 percent – fail to meet widely accepted Payment Card Industry (PCI) data security standards.The Verizon 2015 Payment Card Industry Compliance Report also found that out of every data breach it studied during the past ten years, every company in question also failed to meet PCI standards when the breach occurred.“This should cause serious pause among lawmakers as failing to meet these standards, exacerbated by the lack of a strong federal data safekeeping standard, leaves merchants, and therefore consumers, more vulnerable to breaches,” Thaler wrote.Thaler also noted the report’s finding that EMV cards in other countries have not served as a “silver bullet” in presenting fraud; rather, they lead fraudsters to find other means. “The report shows that once EMV use increases, criminals shift their focus to card not present transactions, such as online shopping,” Thaler wrote. “NAFCU has long argued that any technology standards must be accompanied by strong data safekeeping standards for merchants akin to what credit unions comply with under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA).” continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Paul Merson names the biggest difference between Manchester United and Arsenal

first_imgPaul Merson names the biggest difference between Manchester United and Arsenal Unai Emery’s side are ahead of Manchester United (Picture: Getty)Paul Merson believes Arsenal have no ambition to win the Premier League and are solely focused as a club on getting into the Champions League.The Gunners are two points ahead of United in the league table after their 2-0 win against Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side at the Emirates on Sunday.United were barely contenders for the top four under Jose Mourinho earlier this term but Solskjaer’s overseen a remarkable transformation at the club and they’re expected to back him significantly in the transfer market this summer.Arsenal, on the other hand, have very little to spend and Unai Emery is keen to offload Mesut Ozil alongside Aaron Ramsey to free up space on the wage bill.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 Mar 2019 10:17 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link782Shares United are expected to appoint Solskjaer on a full-term basis (Picture: Getty)Merson believes United have more ambition than his former club Arsenal and says the Red Devils will be challenging for top honours next season.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I was very fortunate to play Arsenal, an unbelievable football club,’ said Merson.‘It’s got to the stage over the last seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13 years – get in the top four. Not win it, get in the top four.‘How are they set out to win it? You think Arsenal set out to win the Premier League? In your wildest dreams. You reckon they aimed that high?‘You’re not telling me their first priority is make sure we get in the top four. And then if we get lucky, and we’re still in it with 10 games to go, we’ve got a chance of winning it.‘I’m not talking about Man United, I’m talking specifically about Arsenal Football Club.‘Man United, this year [no], and they weren’t last year. Next year, they aren’t messing about for top four.‘They will want to win the league. And they will make an effort to win the league and they’ll buy players. Arsenal won’t.’MORE: What Sergio Ramos told Florentino Perez over Zinedine Zidane’s Real Madrid return Commentlast_img read more

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