Gen. Bozizé’s forces release journalist

first_imgNews Central African RepublicAfrica News News RSF_en Help by sharing this information December 13, 2019 Find out more May 13, 2020 Find out more April 6, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Central African Republic Organisation center_img March 23, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Gen. Bozizé’s forces release journalist Receive email alerts RSF decries arbitrary blocking of two CAR news websites 23.03.03Mathurin Momet, editor of the privately-owned daily Le Confident, was released along with a number of other detainees on 15 March following the coup d’etat led by Gen. François Bozizé. The privately-owned news media had suspended publication on 3 March to protest against Momet’s detention._______________________________________________________________24.02.03Publication director arrestedMathurin Momet, publication director of the private daily Le Confident, was arrested by plainclothes police officers at his newspaper’s offices on 20 February 2003.Reporters Without Borders condemns this unwarranted arrest. The organisation urges the authorities to do everything in their power to ensure that the journalist is released without delay and that those responsible for his arrest are punished.According to Reporters Without Border’s information, Momet was interrogated at the police station in Bangui’s harbour. The journalist is accused of “threatening the state’s internal and external security” and “inciting hatred”. His colleagues,friends and family have been prevented from meeting with the journalistsince his arrest.The authorities hold the journalist responsible for several contentiousarticles, including one published in his newspaper’s 19 February edition,entitled “Bossembélé: the sub-prefect and brigade commander beaten up by theBanyamulengue”, in which he denounced the conduct of Jean Pierre Bemba’sMouvement de libération du Congo, a Congolese rebel group. The journalistalso criticised President Ange-Felix Patassé’s inability to rein in therebels. Police officers reportedly also questioned the journalist about a 20February article entitled “Patassé humiliated at the 22nd Franco-AfricanSummit”.On the occasion of the 22nd Franco-African Summit, Reporters Without Borders recalls that since the attempted coup on 25 October 2002, Central African Republic journalists have been working under a great deal of pressure, which has in turn led to increasing self-censorship in both the public and private press. Six years on, same unanswered questions about French journalist’s death in CAR to go further News Central African RepublicAfrica CAR policeman who shot reporter must be punished, RSF sayslast_img read more

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Union Station Homeless Services Appoints New CEO, John Brauer

first_img Community News Herbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities People Don’t Love AnymoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff John BrauerUnion Station Homeless Services, for decades a major non-profit homeless services provider in Pasadena, announced the appointment today of John Brauer as the agency’s new Chief Executive Officer, effective November 2016.John Brauer has more than 25 years of non-profit executive experience and holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology. He comes to Union Station from NW Works, a Virginia-based non-profit agency that provides employment, training and support services to adults with disabilities.“I am very excited to be joining such a wonderful organization. Union Station Homeless Services truly makes a difference in the lives of individuals experiencing homelessness, and I’m proud to be the newest member of their team. I can’t wait to roll up my sleeves and jump in!”John’s experience working with youth and adults with disabilities – including people experiencing homelessness – includes day programs, work programs, therapeutic behavior services, social enterprise development, advocacy, government fundraising, and community outreach.Prior to his work in the non-profit sector, John owned and ran two for-profit businesses. He currently serves as adjunct professor for Florida State University where he teaches graduate level courses in Budget & Finance and Personnel Management for the Department of Social Work.John Brauer takes the reigns from Rabbi Marvin Gross, who retired in June 2016 after serving as the leader of Union Station since 1995.Union Station has been providing life-saving services to homeless and highly vulnerable community members since 1973. It is part of a premier group of human services agencies in Los Angeles County that are leading the way to ending homelessness, and it is the San Gabriel Valley’s lead agency assisting homeless and very low-income adults and families.About Union Station Homeless ServicesUnion Station Homeless Services, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, is committed to helping homeless men, women and children rebuild their lives. Union Station Homeless Services is part of a premier group of human services agencies in Los Angeles County that are leading the way to ending homelessness in our community. We are the San Gabriel Valley’s largest social service agency assisting homeless and very low-income adults and families. We believe every person deserves a life of dignity and a safe place to call home. With 43 years of experience, we proudly offer a full continuum of street outreach, assessment, shelter, housing and career development services. 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment People Union Station Homeless Services Appoints New CEO, John Brauer 25-Year Non-Profit Veteran Joins Premier Southern California Homeless Service Provider From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, August 22, 2016 | 11:58 am Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribecenter_img Top of the News Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Lost Beatles Recording Found 52 Years Later

first_imgA family was recently cleaning out their attic when they stumbled upon a 7-inch vinyl of the only known recording for “It’s For You” sung by Sir Paul McCartney. The song was co-penned by McCartney and John Lennon in 1964 for their dear friend and English singer Cilla Black. The voices were tracked separately, with McCartney sending his demo to Black for reference. The demo was apparently lost forever, until Black’s family found the 7-inch Dick James demo disc in a brown paper envelope a solid 52 years later. It is now being put up for auction, and is expected to go for £15,000 and £20,000. Wow! You can listen to Black’s version of the song, “It’s For You,” which earned itself No.7 in the UK during its release in July of 1964.[via CoS]last_img

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Forward into the past

first_img A whale of a time Full-size whale skeletons hang from the ceiling of the renovated Hall of Mammals inside Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ). Touchy feely Omura and Hoekstra examine pelts that, as “type specimens,” help define the species for science. Box of bones These deer mouse bones were collected by Hoekstra, who is studying the impact of natural selection on deer mice fur color. Mammal people Hopi Hoekstra, Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences and curator of mammology, and Mark Omura, curatorial assistant, talk amidst the MCZ’s mammal collection. Self-portrait, with antlers Suspended antlers frame Omura inside another of the MCZ’s unique collections. Hall of Mammals Inside the Hall of Mammals, animal skeletons live alongside their furred, lifelike companions. In the eye of the giraffe In the “attic,” Hoekstra uncovers a giraffe whose neck is as tall as she. MCZ celebrates 150 years Animal applause With an animal audience behind him, Omura discusses specimens in the MCZ’s mammal collection. center_img Toys in the attic Omura walks among treasures stored in the MCZ’s “attic.” At Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), there’s a New Guinea butterfly whose collector was himself captured and eaten by cannibals. There’s a 150-million-year-old kronosaurus, whose toothy skeleton covers an entire exhibit wall. There’s a now-extinct black mamo, a bird with a long curved beak caught on explorer James Cook’s 1778 voyage to Hawaii, which he “discovered” for Europeans.The now-extinct species in the museum’s display cases, drawers, and cabinets include a dodo and a great auk, a passenger pigeon and ivory-billed woodpeckers, a Steller’s sea cow and a Tasmanian tiger. There are many thousands of present-day creatures too, including giant whales, giraffes, and gorillas.The museum, which marks its 150th anniversary this year, is full of musty, dusty specimens, about 21 million and counting.But if you thought the MCZ is frozen in time, you’d be dead wrong. The digital and the DNA revolutions have arrived in full force, and the museum is roaring headlong into the Internet age.Museum staff members already have loaded almost 700,000 digital records onto the Web, where they are accessible to researchers and students alike, and officials hope to complete the process within five years. DNA testing, which was unknown when many of the specimens were gathered decades ago, has become a master key in tracing animals’ lineage and evolution. Even the oldest samples generally yield telltale DNA.In short, the museum is stuffed full of specimens, from basement to attic — where a blue whale resides — but it has never been about the specimens, as such. It was, and is, about the knowledge that they contain. A whale of a time Full-size whale skeletons hang from the ceiling of the renovated Hall of Mammals inside Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ). Gorillas in the mist Against a pitch background, this gorilla skull can really shine. Brown panther Skin and fur, claws and whiskers of a panther — one of the MCZ’s valued “type specimens.” Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer The beetles, bats, and other beasts sitting in drawers, cabinets, and display cases constitute both a vast library of life and a scientific time machine. They tell scientists who are savvy enough to ask not just the details of a specific bird or lizard or snail, but about where it lived and when.In this anniversary year, the MCZ is allowing itself a reprieve from the frenetic pace of collecting, educating, and researching to remember its past. Yet in examining the intent of its founder, Louis Agassiz, it also finds itself looking at its future.MCZ Director James Hanken said Agassiz’s vision of the museum as a place for education and research on the origin, history, and diversity of life endures today. And though the traditional collections remain, that search for knowledge is executed increasingly through modern methods. There are several major drives under way to digitize the museum’s collections, beginning with the so-called metadata, the written details accompanying a specimen, where it was collected, when, and by whom.Other information is being added as it becomes available, such as digital images, X-rays, and field notes. The digitized, online database for the ichthyology collection, for example, shows 23 specimens of piranha, the famed flesh-eating fish that haunts South American waterways. The records show where, when, and by whom the fish were collected, and that two species, despite the piranha’s fearsome reputation, are fruit eaters.Examining specimens with a mouse clickAnother effort, begun last summer, raises the bar on the type of information available to far-flung scholars over the Internet. A program called Aves 3D uses advanced laser scanners to create three-dimensional digital images of the museum’s 12,000 bird skeletons, which include such gems as a complete skeleton of the extinct dodo. The effort will result in an online database available to scholars and schoolchildren alike that will allow those interested not only to see the bird bones, but to measure and manipulate them in three dimensions.Hanken reeled off a list of other digitization efforts, among them HerpNet for reptiles and amphibians, FishNet for fish, ORNIS for birds, and MaNIS for mammals. There are others, each with a different wrinkle in the nature and type of information available.Hanken said the museum’s digital strides have already resulted in increases in the number of scholars using the collections and decreases in the number of requests for in-person visits or for specimens to be mailed to researchers’ home institutions. That has the twin benefit, Hanken said, of increasing the collection’s usefulness while decreasing wear and tear on the specimens.“We’re basically going to digitize everything associated with the specimens. Anyone, anywhere can pull up information anytime for free,” Hanken said. “We’re sitting on a gold mine of information. The trick is to get this stuff out there. Many scientists don’t know what we have.”The digitization effort across the MCZ has already generated 687,210 records, encompassing more than a million specimens. Though funding may prove a limiting factor, Hanken said he expects the process to be completed in the next five years.Then there are the myriad cutting-edge uses for DNA, that revelatory foundation of modern science, which is in every MCZ specimen. It is held in death as it was in life, in tissues preserved in various ways, soaked in alcohol, dried, or held in feathers or fur.In recent years, investigating a creature’s DNA has become as important as measuring its beak size or skull dimensions in science’s efforts to understand a creature and how it interacts with its environment. Hanken and the MCZ’s faculty curators say that the rising prominence of DNA in scientific inquiry has made the museum’s specimens more relevant, not less.Hopi Hoekstra, the MCZ’s curator of mammals and Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences, said that for virtually every mammal specimen collected a bit of tissue is also taken and held frozen as a DNA specimen. That practice is true for other collections as well, Hanken said, and the museum plans to create a holding area for deep-frozen tissues as part of a centralized collection.“People routinely collect materials for genetic analysis,” Hanken said. “It’ll hold hundreds of thousands of specimens.”While tissues collected specifically for DNA analysis are valuable, Hoekstra said one strength of the MCZ collections is that for many specimens, even the older ones, usable DNA can still be extracted.Hoekstra’s own research, which has added 3,000 specimens to the mammal collection in the past two years, examines natural selection’s impact on the coat color of deer mice.“A lot of our work depends on collections from 100 years ago, so we can compare temporally,” Hoekstra said. “We can … get DNA out of ancient specimens. We can look not only at differences in color but also at genetic change through time. Some older specimens have been skinned, dried, and dipped in benzene, and we can still get useful DNA out of them.”Hoekstra and Hanken said that with an extinction crisis under way amid a warming world, museum collections are more important than ever in helping to unravel the changes taking place.“If you think about global climate change, we can document changes in the ranges of animals. Things are being found in places they never have before and are lost in places where they once were,” Hoekstra said.So much for the idea that the museum is a musty home for stuffed animals.A collection born amid controversyThe MCZ was founded in 1859 by famed Swiss scientist Louis Agassiz, who was known for discovering the Ice Ages. Agassiz came to Harvard intent on starting a museum that would rival the great institutions of Europe. Today, however, Agassiz is as much remembered for being on the wrong side of the evolution debate as he is for his work at the MCZ or for his earlier scientific findings.His efforts not only established an enduring scientific institution, but also drove collecting efforts that enriched it. One expedition to the Amazon, during which Agassiz hoped to find evidence against Charles Darwin’s theories of evolution, gathered specimens representing 2,200 species, an astounding 2,000 of which were new to science.Agassiz’s son, Alexander, furthered his father’s efforts. He became the museum’s second and longest-serving director and used his great personal wealth to bring his father’s museum vision to fruition.There have been nine directors since the museum’s founding, including prominent scientists such as evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr, who led the institution from 1961 to 1970. In addition to the museum’s directors, research is conducted by faculty curators of 12 departments and the Concord Field Station, covering subjects and collections from entomology to vertebrate paleontology. These curators also hold appointments in Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology.Presenting a popular public faceThough research and teaching are the MCZ’s main reasons for being, its public galleries have been an important component of its educational mission since its founding.In 1998, the MCZ joined with two other Harvard institutions, the Harvard University Herbaria, owner of the famed Glass Flowers collection, and the Mineralogical and Geological Museum to form the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH). The HMNH manages the three institutions’ public programs, employing museum professionals who collaborate with curators to design exhibits, arrange lectures, and put together weekend classes and workshops.The galleries represent a mix of historical and modern museum sensibilities. New exhibits on color in nature; on the broad array of insects, crustaceans, and other arthropods; and on evolution employ the latest in museum-presentation techniques, with eye-catching, interactive displays, explanatory placards, and sometimes dazzling arrangements of specimens.But the museum also contains galleries as Agassiz intended them. Agassiz was widely praised after the MCZ’s opening for his arrangement of specimens according to geographic location, something that was not done at other museums and that allowed visitors to gain a better understanding of the natural context in which creatures were found. To this day, several galleries remain organized according to those guidelines, presenting animals from Africa, South America, and other locations.To celebrate its anniversary, the museum renovated one of its gems, the Great Hall of Mammals. The two-story room, surrounded by a gallery level holding more exhibits, is the last survivor of the original halls that filled the museum building when it opened. The others became victims to the space squeeze that has been a constant at the museum, their galleries floored over, and their space divided up to other purposes.Soaring and bright, the Mammal Hall now holds a full-sized giraffe, camels, and other large mammals enclosed in glass cases, presented today as they were when the museum opened. Hanging from the rafters — at eye level from the gallery — are large skeletons of a sperm whale, a fin whale, and a right whale. The renovation saw the floors refinished, the walls painted, and the exhibits cleaned and rearranged, but the effort kept the hall true to its original grandeur.“The idea was to very much retain its Victorian look. That’s one of the [unique] things of this museum, it’s a museum of museums,” Hoekstra said.Harvard’s “museum of museums” is alive and well, at least from the visitors’ standpoint, with their numbers increasing, approaching 200,000 last year.“We’re one of the University’s best ‘front doors,’ ” Hanken said.Hanken believes that the museum’s most valuable collections are its holotypes, the first members of a species to be collected and named. These sample specimens are taken and kept in museums as examples of new species, providing critical reference points for future biologists working on them. The MCZ, Hanken said, has tens of thousands of type specimens, including the gorilla, the wolf, the Florida panther, and the fox.With aging specimens providing massive amounts of fresh knowledge, at the MCZ, the past is prologue.last_img read more

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Live in Hamptons style luxury in the Avenues

first_imgThe home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.“There’s a real sense of community,” she said.“Your neighbours are genuine friends and everyone looks out for each other. We’ll miss that.” Inside 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said the couple moved into the home in 2014, and renovated three years later.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours ago“We wanted to live in it before making any changes,” she said.“That was the best decision we ever made. Open plan living and dining at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said it was the neighbourhood that prompted them to buy the rundown 1920s post-war home.“It was the worst house in the best street,” she said. Natural light and air fills 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.There are two bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, plus master suite with walk-in wardrobe and ensuite plus an office, bathroom, separate toilet and laundry and additional living room. The dreamy kitchen at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.The property is spread over two levels and sits on a 655sq m block. Upon entry, there is a large open-plan living and dining area and kitchen with butler’s pantry. Multiple living areas at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.On the lower level, there are two bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, plus rumpus room, bathroom, workshop and covered deck. center_img 88 Mareeba Rd, AshgroveLocated in the family-friendly streets of Ashgrove, this home has been exquisitely renovated and maintained. Hamptons style interiors fill the home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.“Now all the main living areas and kitchen are right at the front of the house. “We love having these rooms so close to the street. It’s the most wonderful neighbourhood and we wanted that connection to be part of the home.” Inside 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said the separate living areas would appeal to buyers.“This layout makes it a great buy for growing families,” she said.Ms Howlett said she would miss the neighbourhood. The home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Owners Sue Howlett and Leigh Fitzsimmons bought the property at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove, in 2008.last_img read more

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Van Persie injury hits United hopes

first_imgDavid Moyes’ slim hopes of Champions League glory receded even further on Friday when Robin van Persie was ruled out for between four and six weeks with a knee injury. A club official said: “Following further investigation Robin van Persie has a sprained knee, which will keep him out for around four to six weeks.” The worst-case scenario for Van Persie is that he is only able to play the final three league games of the season. If Van Persie’s rehabilitation goes as well as possible, he should be fit for United’s game at Everton on April 20. He will definitely be out of Saturday’s trip to West Ham, the derby against Manchester City on Tuesday and both legs of United’s Champions League quarter-final against reigning champions Bayern Munich. Speaking before the length of Van Persie’s absence was confirmed, the United manager said: “Robin van Persie scored three goals in the Champions League. I don’t know how you would want to be without a player of his ability and qualities.” The Dutch Football Association will be concerned by the news too, given that Van Persie may only return just over a week before the end of the season. Coach Louis Van Gaal will have to decide whether to include the player in his provisional World Cup squad on May 13. One crumb of comfort for United is that Danny Welbeck has played well recently so Moyes will be hoping the England international can prove to be an able deputy – starting with Saturday’s trip to Upton Park Press Association A bigger test awaits Moyes against Munich, who come to Old Trafford on April 1 for the first leg. Pep Guardiola has had little trouble adapting to life in Germany following his year-long sabbatical after leaving his role as coach of Barcelona. Bayern are unbeaten atop the Bundesliga and they wasted little effort brushing aside Arsenal in the last 16. Moyes has watched Bayern on a few occasions this year though and he is convinced there are weaknesses in the German side he can exploit. “They have proved they are the best by winning the World Club Championship but I’ve had a chance to see Munich a few times, I watched them at Arsenal and they are a good team,” Moyes said. “But I’ve got a few things that I would say that I’ve seen that I would try to work on and capitalise on.” Van Persie fired United into the last eight of the competition with a stunning hat-trick against Olympiacos on Wednesday, but he left the field on a stretcher following a tackle from behind in the dying minutes. Moyes hoped the injury was not serious, but a second scan revealed the striker would be out for a considerable time. last_img read more

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Carter named world player of the year

first_imgThe out half was instrumental in New Zealand capturing the World cup.New Zealand were named Team of the Year after becoming the first nation to successfully defend the Webb Ellis Cup while former Leinster coach Michael Cheika was named coach of the year.Cheika led Australia to the final.last_img

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Dream trip awaits England’s GolfSixes winners

first_img The countdown is on to the final of England Golf’s GolfSixes competition for club members – where the winners will qualify for a luxury trip to Portugal and a once-in-a-lifetime European Tour experience.The top pair in the national final at Centurion Club, Hertfordshire, on Thursday 2 May will be handed the honour of representing England in the pro-am at the 2019 GolfSixes Cascais in Portugal.They’ll tee up alongside stars of the European Tour and the women’s game on Thursday 6 June on the stunning Oitavos Dunes course, in the beautiful region of Cascais close to Lisbon.Then, they’ll get the full VIP treatment at GolfSixes itself, watching the players compete for a €1m prize fund over two days. The European Tour’s fun and fast six-hole tournament will be played on 7-8 June.The winning pair will also receive return flights to Lisbon, three nights’ accommodation and a GolfSixes gift pack.GolfSixes is being played in continental Europe for the first time since it launched at the Centurion Club two years ago, winning many fans with its bright, modern format. It breaks barriers with innovations like the shot clock, music, pyrotechnics, painted fairways, on-course interviews and fan engagement.Last year England Golf partnered with the European Tour to take GolfSixes to its club members, inspiring people to take up the game or play more often. A national competition was launched with affiliated clubs invited to stage qualifying GolfSixes events.Over 100 clubs have entered the inaugural event and their two qualifying players will head to the national final at the Centurion Club. Clubs have until Friday 12 April 2019 to complete and submit this form with details of their successful players.James Crampton, England Golf Championship Director, said: “We’re thrilled to be working with the European Tour to offer this dream opportunity to our members. We’ve had a fantastic response to our first competition and I’d like to wish good luck to all our finalists.”Mark Casey, Championship Director of GolfSixes Cascais, said: “We are delighted to be working alongside England Golf to launch this initiative once again, which showcases exactly what GolfSixes is all about – getting grassroots golfers involved in this exciting and innovative format.“We want golfers across the country to get into this fun new format. This provides a great opportunity to play alongside some of the best players in the world game, both male and female, and enjoy the excitement of a tournament which has captured the imagination of the sporting public in the last two years.“I would like to thank Centurion Club for hosting the national qualifying event to extend their association with the tournament, as well as Cascais Municipality, who will hosting the professional event in the next three years, for their generous hospitality.”The GolfSixes format has not only proven a huge success on the European Tour – with The 2018 Ryder Cup also featuring the concept as part of its build-up at Le Golf National – but it has also been adopted across the grassroots of golf. The Golf Foundation’s GolfSixes League for juniors has involved 24 leagues across 22 UK regions, involving 112 golf clubs and nearly 1,500 junior golfers.Oitavos Dunes is currently ranked 55th in Golf Magazine’s Top 100 Golf Courses in the World, while it is listed as Portugal’s Number One golf course.It has hosted the Open de Portugal on four occasions, first in 2005 when Paul Broadhurst emerged victorious, and then in three years in succession in 2007, 2008 and 2009, won by Pablo Martin Benavides, Grégory Bourdy and Michael Hoey respectively.Captions: The 2018 GolfSixes England men’s team, Matt Wallace and Eddie Pepperell. (Image copyright Getty Images). 25 Feb 2019 Dream trip awaits England’s GolfSixes winners Tags: Centurion Club, club golf, European Tour, GolfSixes, grassroots golflast_img read more

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Little Red Schoolhouse, Mixx 96.1 Back-to-School Supplies and Fund Drive

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Little Red Schoolhouse As part of the Little Red Schoolhouse Project, Mixx 96.1 (96.1 FM radio) is holding a Back-to-School Supplies and Fund Drive Friday, August 15 from 6 a.m.-6 p.m.Drop by their broadcast site at the corner of State and Washington in downtown Olympia with school supplies (such as lined paper, 3-ring binders, rulers, markers, child-size scissors, pencils, and backpacks), coats or new socks and underwear, or cash to buy calculators, backpacks, and school supplies in bulk. Used clothing, aside from coats and jackets, will not be accepted this year.Checks can be made out to Little Red Schoolhouse and mailed to: P.O. Box 6302, Olympia, WA 98507.Supplies, backpacks, socks and underwear will be distributed FREE to all Thurston County families in need at a new location, Komachin Middle School, 3650 College St. SE, Lacey (IT route #64) from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, August 21.The Little Red Schoolhouse Project is under the umbrella of TOGETHER!. Partners include Junior League of Olympia, Sound to Harbor Head Start/ECEAP, Community Action Council, The United Churches, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, St. Michael’s Parish, Independent Order of Oddfellows, Olympia-Lacey Church of God, Garden Courte Memory Community, and Mixx 96.1 KXXO.For more information or to volunteer your services, please call Community Action Council, 360-438-1100 extension 1143 or see www.redschool.orglast_img read more

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Unique Locations for Small Weddings

first_imgVia 4545 Broad St.Red Bank 732.450.9945www.via45.com Sometimes, the smallest weddings are the hardest to arrange.Much of the preparation work must be done by the future bride and groom themselves, often without the assistance of a wedding planner or catering hall. And so much can go wrong (the food, the photographer, the band) or be overlooked (did anyone remember the ring?).But while there may be some extra work, a small wedding event also offers the wedding couple a big advantage: The ability to produce a cozy, custom-made experience, tailored to the precise tastes and preferences of the bride, groom and guests. Some of that experience can include a favorite restaurant where you might not think a wedding was a possibility.Couples planning small weddings should consider approaching the operators of restaurants where they enjoy the food or the wine list or the ambiance. They might be surprised to learn that, yes, the restaurant will provide space for a small wedding and, yes, they will serve that wonderful tortellini or swordfish dish that you adore.One of the local restaurants that will host a small wedding (with 20 to 40 guests) is Ama Ristorante at the Driftwood, Sea Bright. Ama offers a private dining room with an ocean view and a stunning mural of a Tuscan landscape.For a larger wedding, Ama will consider dedicating the main dining room as well if the event is scheduled on days other than Friday and Saturday from October through April.Another restaurant that will considerer dedicating the entire dining room to one party is Via 45, Red Bank, which does not offer a private dining room. Again, Via 45 asks couples to consider weeknights for such events.Ama Ristorante at Driftwood1485 Ocean Ave.Sea Bright 732.530.9760www.amaristorante.comlast_img read more

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