Gen. Bozizé’s forces release journalist

first_imgNews Central African RepublicAfrica News News RSF_en Help by sharing this information December 13, 2019 Find out more May 13, 2020 Find out more April 6, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Central African Republic Organisation center_img March 23, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Gen. Bozizé’s forces release journalist Receive email alerts RSF decries arbitrary blocking of two CAR news websites 23.03.03Mathurin Momet, editor of the privately-owned daily Le Confident, was released along with a number of other detainees on 15 March following the coup d’etat led by Gen. François Bozizé. The privately-owned news media had suspended publication on 3 March to protest against Momet’s detention._______________________________________________________________24.02.03Publication director arrestedMathurin Momet, publication director of the private daily Le Confident, was arrested by plainclothes police officers at his newspaper’s offices on 20 February 2003.Reporters Without Borders condemns this unwarranted arrest. The organisation urges the authorities to do everything in their power to ensure that the journalist is released without delay and that those responsible for his arrest are punished.According to Reporters Without Border’s information, Momet was interrogated at the police station in Bangui’s harbour. The journalist is accused of “threatening the state’s internal and external security” and “inciting hatred”. His colleagues,friends and family have been prevented from meeting with the journalistsince his arrest.The authorities hold the journalist responsible for several contentiousarticles, including one published in his newspaper’s 19 February edition,entitled “Bossembélé: the sub-prefect and brigade commander beaten up by theBanyamulengue”, in which he denounced the conduct of Jean Pierre Bemba’sMouvement de libération du Congo, a Congolese rebel group. The journalistalso criticised President Ange-Felix Patassé’s inability to rein in therebels. Police officers reportedly also questioned the journalist about a 20February article entitled “Patassé humiliated at the 22nd Franco-AfricanSummit”.On the occasion of the 22nd Franco-African Summit, Reporters Without Borders recalls that since the attempted coup on 25 October 2002, Central African Republic journalists have been working under a great deal of pressure, which has in turn led to increasing self-censorship in both the public and private press. Six years on, same unanswered questions about French journalist’s death in CAR to go further News Central African RepublicAfrica CAR policeman who shot reporter must be punished, RSF sayslast_img read more

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Warriors announce promotions within the front office

first_imgOAKLAND – Warriors announced various promotions with their coaching staff, front office and training staff.The team promoted Bruce Fraser (assistant coach)and Chris DeMarco to (assistant coach, director of player development). They also announced the hiring of former Warrior Mike Dunleavy, and Steve Kerr’s son, Nick, as an assistant video coordinator.Fraser, best known for helping guide Stephen Curry’s rise during Kerr’s tenure, will now be apart of the coaching staff.“Bruce has done a …last_img

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H-DNL football: St. Bernard’s wins slugfest against Eureka

first_imgFor the first time in program history, St. Bernard’s reigns supreme over Eureka High.Will Omey rushed for two touchdown, Lane Thrap added a third and the Crusaders defense controlled its neighbors from down from the way from the first kick to the final knee as St. Bernard’s downed Big 4 Conference foe Eureka 21-13, Saturday afternoon at Crusader Field.“We stood tall today,” Crusaders head coach Matt Tomlin said. “I couldn’t be more proud. We practice as a family, play as a family and win as a …last_img

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Backupify’s CEO On Wooing Investors: “It’s Like Dating”

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Here at ReadWriteStart, we’ve been following the Open Angel Forum closely as Jason Calacanis’ project moves from city to city bringing angel investors and worthy startups together in one room. The first event in Los Angeles was of particular success to Backupify, which provides backup for your online social network data, including Facebook, Twitter, Delicious, WordPress, Gmail, Basecamp and many other services. Following the event, the company raised a Series A round of $900,000 from Calacanis, Chris Sacca, First Round Capital and a few others.Earlier this week, CEO Rob May posted his take on the process of raising funding from VCs, which he likens to dating. According to May, pitching to VCs is not about forcing your idea down their throat and convincing them why they should invest in it; if a startup and a VC are meant to be, it will be more like love at first sight.“They either like you and your idea, or they don’t. It’s like dating because your goal in dating is not to convince someone who is a bad match for you that somehow you are really a good match. That’s a recipe for divorce,” says May. “It’s really about finding the person that is naturally a good match. Same way with investors.” One thing that May did much differently than other entrepreneurs seeking funding is that he approached investors without a business plan. While he doesn’t recommend this as a solution for every startup, he does find that in his case, not having a business plan did not really hinder his efforts.“I sat in front of VCs who thought I was crazy for not having a business plan. I was asked ‘how can you run your business if you don’t have a written plan?’,” says May. “I also sat in front of VCs who said ‘glad you didn’t waste time writing a plan, because we wouldn’t read it anyway.’ It’s really more of an art, not a science.”Another less standard practice May chose to include in his presentation at the Open Angel Forum was not a special slide on his pitch deck or a certain phrase; May drank a beer while presenting. Again, he doesn’t suggest this is a solution for everyone, but he uses it as an example of how to relax and “be yourself” when pitching to VCs. They are very experienced at talking to startups and any good VC knows how to spot when you are full of hot air, and they will call you on it.“It’s never easy, not even when you have a good idea. That’s the point. That’s why so few people ever do it,” says May. “If you want to learn to raise money, the best thing to do is go try to raise money.”Photo by Flickr user apol3. Tags:#How To#start Related Posts center_img chris cameron Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Dealing With Ductwork in an Unconditioned Attic

first_imgAdd more insulationDana Dorsett would have Ted get the level of insulation much closer to the R-49 recommended in the International Residential Code.“In a DOE Climate Zone 7 (not to be confused with a USDA plant hardiness zone 7) a mere 8 inches of fluff is woefully inadequate,” Dorsett says. “IRC code-minimum for zone 7 is R-49, and you have barely half that. Air sealing all the ducts and air handler connections and seams, and air sealing all the duct boots to the ceiling gypsum (and any other penetrations) is a critical first step prior to adding any insulation.”(As it turns out, Ted initially confused the two climate zone designations. His house is located in DOE Climate Zone 4, not Zone 7 as he had originally indicated. But the code recommendation for attic insulation is the same — it’s R-49 in both in Zone 4 and Zone 7.)Dorsett suggests that a low-e silver-colored paint on the underside of the roof deck, or a perforated radiant barrier under the rafters, would make a difference during the cooling season (with only modest increases in heating costs during the winter). The first step, though, is more insulation.“But you might start with over-blowing the floor-fluff with 6-8 inches of cellulose, to bring the combined depth to about 15-16 inches,” Dorsett says. “(As a DIY, do what the pros do — install multiple depth gauge strips to know when you’re there.)” RELATED ARTICLES Attic conversions can be expensiveAs if to underscore Holladay’s point, Brian Gray, writing from Chicago, says that he faces a nearly identical situation as Ted does, and the fix is looking to be anything but cheap.“I’ve been debating my situation for what seems like forever,” he says. It comes down to three options, the first of which is to convert his attic into a conditioned space by installing 4 1/2 inches of polyiso insulation above the roof deck and then adding a new standing-seam metal roof. He’d add open-cell foam below the roof deck to give the assembly the required R-value, but the bids range from $40,000 to $60,000.His other options are cheaper, but they have some disadvantages.“$40K+ is a lot of money to solve a problem, but I get a new roof, better curb appeal, and surely a higher resale,” he says. “That said, it’s a lot of money.” Our expert’s opinionPeter Yost, GBA’s technical director, adds this:No organism we know of puts its lungs, unsheltered, outside its body; so putting HVAC systems outside a conditioned space is hardly biomimicry. But there we are, with ducts and HVAC units in the hostile environment of an unconditioned attic.First thing: Kill the attic ventilator. Unless you have a perfect air barrier at the ceiling line — and why would you if you are already in a building where someone chose to put the space conditioning outside? — you will be pulling makeup air along the paths of least resistance, including from the conditioned space below. You can’t vent your way out of this predicament.The best option is to move the conditioned boundary to the roofline. Insulate and air seal to pull the attic inside the building. This could and should have been done in the first place, but now you have another chance to make it right.The next best option is to encapsulate the ducts. See recommendations for accomplishing this at the Building America Solution Center. Note all the tabs for various items of key information.For more information, see two other suggested solutions: Ducts Buried in Attic Insulation and Ducts Buried in Attic Insulation & Encapsulated. Note that the former approach is not recommended in moist and marine climates while the latter approach is OK for all climates. Ted has more than a few cobwebs in his attic. The unconditioned space also houses his HVAC system.The 1,800-square-foot brick ranch in Climate Zone 4 dates from the 1960s, but the previous owner installed both a furnace and ductwork in the attic just four years ago. Ted also has inherited a powered attic ventilator. Although both the attic floor and the ductwork are insulated, Ted recognizes the situation isn’t ideal.Summer hasn’t even arrived, he notes in a post at GBA’s Q&A forum, and when the temperature outside climbs to more than 95°F, the temperature in the attic tops 120°F. That has kept the ventilator working, but Ted surmises the high temperatures are reducing the efficiency of his air conditioning equipment.“Should I turn off the ventilator so it won’t suck cool air from the conditioned area?” Ted asks. “Should I put more insulation material on top of the attic floor and the ductwork? Will a radiant barrier under the rafters help?” How much insulation do ducts really need?Ted notes that flexible ducts sold in retail stores seems to be insulated to R-4 or R-8, but by his own measurements conditioned air still shows a 10° to 15° drop from one end of the supply trunk to the other. Should there be such a steep drop in temperature in a run of only about 10 feet?“You are correct that the drop in temperature indicates that the duct is poorly insulated,” Holladay replies. “R-4 or R-8 duct insulation is certainly better than nothing, but for those of us who care about insulation, even R-8 doesn’t make much sense for ducts that are outside of the home’s thermal envelope.“After all, most new homes have R-49 insulation on the attic floor,” Holladay continues. “When the attic is 20°F, that insulation is addressing a delta-T of 50 F°. But the air in the ducts is facing a delta-T of maybe 100 F° or 120 F° — a greater delta-T. So (logically) the ducts deserve more, not less, insulation. Obviously, it’s hard to install R-60 duct insulation. But I raise the delta-T discussion to demonstrate why it’s so important to bring your ducts inside your home’s thermal envelope.”Dorsett adds this thought to the discussion about duct work insulation: “The reason ducts don’t need R-60 insulation despite the higher temperature difference is that total square footage of the duct surface area is much less than the attic floor, and the duty cycle on most systems isn’t anywhere near 100%. R-8 is usually fine for supply ducts, and less is OK for return ducts (due to the smaller temperature difference).”This may be true, Holladay says, but even R-8 insulation doesn’t solve the problem when ducts are located in the wrong place. “Ducts need to be indoors,” he says.center_img Keeping Ducts IndoorsCreating a Conditioned AtticFans in the Attic: Do They Help or Do They Hurt?Are Solar-Powered Attic Ventilators Green?All About Attic VentingGreen Basics: Fans and Natural CoolingAll About Attics Turn off the fanGBA senior editor Martin Holladay notes that the fan is problematic: “The best approach is to immediately disconnect the powered attic ventilator, and then to hire a contractor to transform your vented unconditioned attic into an unvented conditioned attic,” Holladay says.No matter what the climate zone, a powered attic ventilator is not a good idea, he adds. (For more information on this issue, see Fans in the Attic: Do They Help or Do They Hurt?)“Creating a conditioned attic to bring HVAC equipment inside the home’s thermal envelope is always good advice — it’s never a good idea to locate HVAC equipment or ducts outside of your home,” Holladay writes. “That said, the required work is expensive, so the investment often makes little sense from an economic payback perspective.”Holladay continues, “Installing a radiant barrier under your rafters may make sense in your case. Moreover, it’s always a good idea to seal leaks at ductwork seams, to seal leaks in your home’s ceiling (the attic floor), and to improve the R-value of your attic insulation and duct insulation.”The cooling effects of an attic ventilation fan are in most cases “negative,” Dorsett says. That is, Ted will end up using more energy, not less.“Attic ventilation is really never about cooling,” he says. “It’s primarily about moisture control, to keep the wood in the attic from getting moldy or rotting. In more humid climates such as on the Gulf Coast, in air conditioned homes even passive attic ventilation puts more moisture into the attic than it removes.” Encapsulating ducts in spray foamOne option Gray is considering is to encase the ducts in his attic with a 3-inch layer of closed-cell foam, a job he believes would be possible with one or two DIY spray kits and a total cost of between $600 and $1,200. Would this idea have any value in Ted’s situation?Because closed-cell foam can only be safely applied in layers, or “lifts,” of 2 inches at a time, Dorsett replies, that’s probably the limit of what should be considered for ductwork.Using different versions of closed-cell foam, applied with different blowing agents, would be slightly more expensive but also allow thicker layers to be applied in a single lift. “At 2 inches, most [hydrofluoroolefin] blown 2-pound foam would be north of R-14, and north of R-20 at 3 inches,” Dorsett says. “It still may not be financially rational to go more than 2 inches.”Open-cell foam, he adds, is another option. Cheaper and less of a threat to the environment, open-cell foam is relatively vapor-permeable, meaning some moisture will collect during long periods of heavy air conditioning use, he says, “but unlike fiber insulation, open-cell foam isn’t air-permeable, and the rate of accumulation is still quite slow, probably slow enough to be OK in a Zone 5A climate.”Dorsett says that most spray foam would have to be coated with an intumescent paint to be fully code-compliant. Those are the questions to get this Q&A Spotlight rolling.last_img read more

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13 Ways To Print Your Instagram Photos

first_imgArtifact Uprising—For a stunning addition to your home, we love the options from Artifact Uprising, which incorporates reclaimed pinewood from its own Colorado backyard. Clipboard calendars ($25, pictured above) with a print for each month are serene for a workstation, and the wood block plus 12 prints ($22) creates a changeable photo display.Instagoodies—Print favorite Instagram photos into books of one-inch stickers ($14). Attach stickers to the computer monitor, phone case, or wallet for a quick flash of happiness.Boo Box by Hatchcraft—For photos worthy of the mantelpiece, go for the Boo Box, which places four-inch Instagram photos in bamboo shadowbox frames beginning at $20.Stickygram—Take a cue from your mom, and turn your refrigerator into bragging grounds for your works of art. For $15, Stickygram makes a set of nine photo magnets from your favorite images.ImageSnap—This service crafts ceramic tiles ranging from two-inch ($4) to 12-inch ($35) squares. Tiles can be installed with mortar and grout just like normal tiles, though the tiny sizes make for perfect refrigerator magnets. Tags:#Instagram kelly schwarze Artflakes—Images get sticky with this company that takes your regular ol’ Instagram pics and whips them into vinyl four-inch stickers (pictured above). Buy them up in packs of 10 ($21), 25 ($42), or 50 ($63).Casetagram—Create a custom case for your device of choice — iPhone 4-5, iPad and iPad Mini, iPod Touch, Samsung Galaxy S II-IV, Galaxy Note, and Nexus 4 — ranging in price from $35-$55. Customize your collage and layout, and then Casetagram prints them on a white or black case.Postagram—A fun way to show people you’re thinking of them, Postagram mails a postcard with pop-out Instagram photo and message to friends for $1 each. A thoughtful alternative to a birthday ecard!Stitchtagram—Now that your walls are filled with Instagram photos, cuddle up to memories with a 15-inch linen-cotton-blend pillow ($68) made from account images.With so many resources to print Instagram photos, you could easily decorate an entire house with iPhone memories. How do you share your mobile-phone photos?Images via Instagram user thecakethatateparis, Artifact Uprising, and ArtflakesMore stories from PopSugar Tech:2013: The Year the White House Geeked Out With Star WarsSteam Summer Sale: The Best Games With the Deepest DiscountsIs It Getting Hot in Here? 7 Weather Apps For Summer Sun ForecastingWhy You Should Back Grace From Outer SpaceA Virtual Science Camp For Real-Life Exploration The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditcenter_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Editor’s note: This post was originally published by our partners at PopSugar Tech.Instagram is the easy way to create dreamy camera-phone photos in a flash. The filters work their magic so well that nearly every picture comes out looking like a keepsake. Making those memories permanent can be just as easy with these tools for turning Instagram photos into lasting works of art.Printstagram—The company offers multiple ways to print Instagram photos, but the 20-by-40-inch posters will make a stunning addition to a living room wall. Between 50-400 photos are arranged in a clean grid on thick archival paper for $25. Fill a Tiny Book ($10 for a set of three) with miniature prints of favorite photos, or the Polaroid-style miniprints ($12 for 48 prints, pictured above) have wide enough borders to double as note cards.PostalPix—Use this iPhone app to print four-inch squares from your Instagram library for only 30 cents each. Other sizes are also available, including two-, five-, and eight-inch-square prints. Fast shipping, a matte finish, professional-quality resolution, and the convenience of mobile shopping make this our first stop for basic Instagram prints.CanvasPop—Those filtered photos are worthy of an at-home gallery. Create a high-resolution 12- or 20-inch-square stretched canvas print for $40 and $114, respectively. Buy multiple canvases for an artful wall vignette.Blurb—Haven’t looked at a photo album in a while? Blurb brings back what now seems like an antiquated way of sharing photos with a modern, Instagram twist. Softcover books with 60 pages of Instagram photos run $19, and a hardcover is $32.last_img read more

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MES Delivers Bulk Carrier SBI Apollo

first_imgzoom Japanese Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (MES) has completed and delivered the Supramax bulk carrier SBI Apollo to NYSE-listed dry bulk owner and operator Scorpio Bulkers.The 60,000 dwt vessel, ordered in December 2013, is the shipbuilder’s 16th Eco-Ship of neo60BC design.With a length of 200 meters and a width of 32.3 meters, the bulker was delivered at Mitsui’s Chiba Works on October 4, 2016.Featuring four cranes and five cargo holds, the vessel is designed for loading various cargoes like coal, ore, grain, as well as lengthy/heavy cargo such as steel pipe and hot coil.SBI Apollo’s main engine, MITSUI-MAN B&W Diesel Engine 6S50ME-B9.3, complies with MARPOL NOx restriction (Tier-II) for exhaust gas emissions.Considering strengthened restriction for SOx, the ship has low sulfur fuel oil tanks, which are designed for operation in ECA (Emission Control Areas), according to MES.last_img read more

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