Trial of Al-Jazeera journalists adjourned for fifth time

first_imgNews RSF_en Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff EgyptMiddle East – North Africa to go further Abdulrahim Shaheen, a reporter for two newspapers – Al-Hurriya wa Al-Adala and Misr 25 – was arrested by national security police yesterday on charges of “membership of a terrorist group,” “inciting hatred” and “spreading false information.”At the same time in Cairo, the trial of 20 Al-Jazeera journalists was adjourned for the fifth time after another hearing today.Journalists continue to be exposed to arbitrary arrest although the new Constitution guarantees freedom of expression and opinion (article 65), freedom of the press (article 70) and media independence (article 72).The Egyptian authorities have clearly not appreciated Al-Jazeera’s coverage of demonstrations in support of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. On 3 September the Administrative Chamber of the Council of State ordered the closure of Al-Jazeera’s Egyptian station.The 20 Al-Jazeera journalists are charged with “undermining national unity and social peace,” “broadcasting false information” and “membership of a terrorist organization.” Eight of the 20 have been arrested while the other 12 are being tried in absentia.The prosecutor’s office has not named the detained journalists but, since 29 December, they have included Cairo bureau chief Mohamed Adel Fahmy, who has Canadian and Egyptian dual citizenship, Baher Mohamed, who is Egyptian, and Peter Greste, who is Australian.Greste is accused of “collaborating with the Egyptian defendants by providing them with money, equipment and information (…) and broadcasting false reports designed to give the impression to the outside world that there was a civil war.”In a show of solidarity, many journalists gathered outside BBC headquarters in London on 7 April, their 100th day in detention.Reporters Without Borders condemns the way the Egyptian authorities are persecuting journalists. They should respect the principles enshrined in the new constitution, especially in article 71, which prohibits jail sentences in media cases.Another Al-Jazeera journalist, Abdullah Al-Shami, has been held since 14 August without any charge being brought against him. He began a hunger strike on 23 January in protest against his arbitrary detention, and has so far reportedly lost 30 kilos in weight.When Reporters Without Borders reached his brother, Mohamed Al-Shami, by telephone, he said he was “very worried” about his health. He said his brother “has seen a doctor only three times since his arrest” and “his health has deteriorated considerably.”In an open letter that Mohamed al-Shami gave to Reporters Without Borders, the detained journalist writes:“My name is Abdullah Al-Shami. I have already lived a quarter-century of my life, of which eight months between four walls where every day is the same as the previous one and the next one. There is no tomorrow here, no novelty. Eighty days have passed since the start of my hunger strike and I will not give up before achieving my goal of being released.My story is not a unique one. It is the story of all those who thirst for the freedom of information that is guaranteed in the laws. Not far from this cell, a door without a barrier or a guard will open and I will look up with confidence and firm determination. I am not a criminal nor a militia member. I am a journalist, and journalism is not a crime.”Fahmy’s health is also worrying. He has a shoulder injury that has not been treated properly and he can no longer move his right arm. His family wrote to acting President Adly Mansour requesting his release so that he can get appropriate treatment. January 22, 2021 Find out more April 11, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Trial of Al-Jazeera journalists adjourned for fifth time February 6, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Egyptcenter_img News Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution News Receive email alerts EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison February 1, 2021 Find out more Organisation Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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11 Questions With Allman Brothers Guitarist Warren Haynes

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Celebrating his latest studio album, Ashes and Dust featuring the newgrass jam band Railroad Earth, revered guitarist Warren Haynes is playing at The Space at Westbury on Oct. 7. The Grammy Award-winning vocalist-songwriter has a decades-long career jamming alongside The Allman Brothers, Gov’t Mule, and The Dead. The Press had the pleasure of speaking with Warren before his big night.Long Island Press: You grew up in Asheville, North Carolina. How did that influence your career?Warren Haynes: When I grew up in the ’60s and ’70s, music in your region made a much larger impression than today. Now, musicians all over the world can discover getting music from anywhere in any genre quite easily due to the technology. But when I was a kid, a lot of the local and regional music helped shape the local musicians. We all learned from each other, we all learned from the local scene, and were exposed to different types of music. Ashes and Dust’s music was very influenced by what I heard when I was really young. Growing up in the mountains of North Carolina, there was a lot of folk music and Appalachian music that I was exposed to from the time that I was probably six or seven years old.LIP: Was the guitar your main influence?WH: I sang long before I started playing guitar. I was seven or eight. The folk music and Appalachian music that I was hearing was mostly in the background and coming from my dad. As kids, you rebel against your parents’ music. Along with my two older brothers, I was listening to soul music. James Brown, The Temptations. I’d also hear The Beatles in the background due to my older brothers.LIP: What got you interested in guitar?WH: It wasn’t until I discovered Rock and Roll music that I really wanted to play guitar. That was quite a few years later. It was all so overwhelming. It was such a great time period to discover guitar-influenced music. Hearing Jimi Hendrix and Cream and Johnny Winter were my first three introductions into that world. The first song that I remember making a big impression on me was “Sound of Silence” by Simon and Garfunkel. I was probably five years old. I heard it on the radio. While I was way too young to understand what the lyrics were about, just the sound of it spooked me and made me wonder what the hell was going on. I think [‘Sound of Silence’] is a masterpiece.LIP: Are there any songs from Ashes and Dust that you’re particularly proud of?WH: I love every song on there. I can allude to the fact that the song “Company Men” is about my father. So, in a different sort of way, I’m very proud of that.LIP: If you could require the president to hear one song, which one would it be?WH: I would say, “Hallelujah Boulevard.” It has several messages that would probably be good for anybody in power.LIP: If you could get any musician or band, living or dead, who would be in your “dream band?”WH: There are so many musicians who have passed away that would be wonderful to have the experience of playing with. People like John Bonham on drums, Jaco Pastorius on base, Wes Montgomery or Jimi Hendrix for guitar, [John] Coltrane, Miles Davis, Bob Marley. I’m kind of easing myself out of the picture here. That just gives me a band that I can sit and listen to.LIP: If your life didn’t turn out the way it did, do you think you still would have pushed for a musical career?WH: I grew up in a time period when the mindset of being a musician was a lifelong process. You didn’t try it for a while and if doesn’t work out you try something else. A lot of people were forced to go into other lines of work because they had families. That didn’t make them stop being musicians, it just made them not rely on the music business to make a living. I think when you decide to be a musician you’re a musician for life. In recent years, I’ve never felt like I would advise people to get into the music business unless they’re completely obsessed with it and they know that’s what they want to do for the rest of their lives. Music is so rewarding if you just experience it in a non-professional way. It’s amazing. Putting the pressure on yourself to have to make a living that way is a hard way to go. I’ve been lucky, but I’ve also made a lot of sacrifices and had a lot of years of struggle. It’s not something that comes about easily.LIP: Everybody’s going to be adding Ashes and Dust to their home collection. Who’s in your home collection? Too many to count?WH: I mean, thousands and thousands. I grew up with two older brothers that were not only avid music lovers with great taste in music, but collectors in their own way, especially one of my brothers. He had thousands of vinyl records when we were growing up and eventually opened up his own record store for like 25 years. There was so much music for me to choose from at any time. Pretty much any genre of music I could discover. It was like growing up in a library.LIP: What is your favorite album by another artist?WH: My favorite jazz album is Something Else by Cannonball Adderley. There’s also a Willie Dixon two CD box set that came out on Chess Records, where it’s all the great blues artists preforming Willie Dixon songs. That’s an amazing thing to have in your collection.LIP: How do you feel about censorship in music?WH: I don’t really care for the most part. I think sometimes having it unnecessarily included is just a cheap way just to garner attention in music. But there are times when what you’re trying to say requires profanity. People don’t have to listen to your music. Make it how you want to make it.LIP: What’s next after Ashes and Dust?WH: Maybe the next Gov’t Mule record. I’m also working on a follow up to Ashes and Dust. We’ll see which comes next.last_img read more

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COVID-19: Jokowi again lambasts Cabinet for ‘lethargic’ response to pandemic

first_imgThe President specifically called on the Health Ministry to immediately reimburse the cost of COVID-19 treatment in the country’s hospitals, as well as paying financial assistance to the families of deceased COVID-19 patients without delay.“The procedures within the Health Ministry should not be complicated,” Jokowi said, “The payment of hospital claims, incentives for medical and laboratory workers should be made immediately. What are we waiting for? The budget has been allocated anyway.”Monday was not the first time that Jokowi lambasted his aides over the country’s COVID-19 response.Read also: COVID-19: Jokowi threatens Cabinet with reshuffle in fiery address In a video posted on the Presidential Secretariat’s official YouTube channel on Sunday, Jokowi was seen saying that he was ready to take “extraordinary steps”, including a Cabinet reshuffle for ministers who failed to take the COVID-19 crisis seriously.In the footage, which was apparently shot during the June 18 Cabinet meeting, the President also lambasted the Health Ministry for being sluggish in paying out the promised financial incentives for health workers on the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak. He cited how only 1.5 percent of the Rp 75 trillion (US$5.3 billion) state budget prepared for the health sector had been disbursed so far.In his statement on Monday, Jokowi also spoke out about incidents where people rejected swab and rapid COVID-19 tests, saying this was because authorities suddenly arrived to perform tests without having properly disseminated information about them.”I think the most important thing is for us to have integrated efforts to control [COVID-19] so that all of us can work effectively without any departmental rivalries between ministries, institutions or regions, as this is unnecessary,” he added.According to the government’s official count, Indonesia recorded 55,092 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Monday, with a total death toll reaching 2,805. (trn)Topics : President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has again demanded his Cabinet make a greater effort to address the COVID-19 crisis, as he criticized what he called a “lethargic” response to the pandemic.In a meeting on Monday, Jokowi told his ministers to do more to handle the health crisis, such as by deploying more healthcare personnel to provinces outside Jakarta that still showed high transmission rates or by increasing the supply of urgently needed medical equipment to help the country in battling the virus.”There must be innovations that can be seen by the people and that have a real impact on controlling the spread of the disease,” Jokowi said, “Unless we do something [to change] such a lethargic [response], there will not be significant improvements.”last_img read more

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Eliud Kipchoge: Five things to know about legendary marathon runner

first_img First Published: 12th October, 2019 16:12 IST LIVE TV SUBSCRIBE TO US Sujay Chakraborty Last Updated: 12th October, 2019 16:12 IST Eliud Kipchoge: Five Things To Know About Legendary Marathon Runner Eliud Kipchoge becomes the first man in the history to complete a marathon under two hours after completing the 2019 INEOS Challenge in Vienna, Austria Written By Eliud Kipchoge made history by completing a marathon in 1 hour 59 minutes 40 seconds in Vienna, Austria. The 34-year old Kenyan completed four laps around the Prater, a park in the center of the Austrian capital to set the record. Let’s take a look at Kipchoge’s achievements. A Kenyan prodigyKipchoge was born on November 5, 1984, in the Nandi district of Kenya and was raised by a single mother also being the youngest of four children. At the age of 16, he met his trainer Patrick Sang and began his marathon career in 2001. In 2002, he was a part of the Kenyan team in the IAAF World Cross Country Championships, Dublin. Kipchoge finished fifth in the individual race and was part of the Kenyan junior team that won gold. He won the juniors individual race at the Championship the following year in Switzerland.Read | Eliud Kipchoge Becomes First Man To Complete Marathon In Under 2 HoursOlympic heroIn 2004, Kipchoge participated in the Olympics in the 5000m race winning a bronze medal in Athens. He followed it up with a silver in 2008 and a gold in 2012 editions of the Olympics held in Beijing and Rio de Janeiro respectively. He also has won a gold medal in the same category at the 2008 Commonwealth Games held in New Delhi, India.Multiple record holderKipchoge has already set a world record for completing the 2018 Berlin Marathon in 2hr 1min and 39sec. He managed to break the previous record by a margin of 1min and 18sec. It was the greatest improvement in the marathon world record since 1987.Read | Mary Kom Controversially Loses WC Semi, Still Bags Record 8th MedalSecond time’s the charmKipchoge has previously attempted the feat in the year 2017 in Monza, Italy. It was named as the 2017 Breaking2 Challenge. He famously missed the mark by just 25 seconds. Finally succeeding in the 2019 INEOS 1:59 Challenge and thereby beating his own marathon record.Global starKipchoge, being the star he is, has endorsements with footwear giant, Nike. He also is the brand ambassador of Safaricom and Isuzu in Kenya. Read | Federer, Djokovic Both Lose In Shanghai Masters QuarterfinalsMarathon WinsKipchoge has participated in 12 marathon events since 2013 and has won 11 of them, finishing second in one. He claimed a gold medal in his last marathon at the 2019 London Marathon. In total, he has won 17 gold medals while representing Kenya as well as an individual athlete.Read | F1: Japanese GP Could Be Postponed As Typhoon Hagibis Looms Large WATCH US LIVE FOLLOW US COMMENTlast_img read more

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Clay Matthews on latest roughing call: NFL is ‘getting soft’

first_imgGreen Bay Packers linebacker Clay Matthews (52) hits Washington Redskins quarterback Alex Smith (11) during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Sept. 23, 2018 in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)LANDOVER, Md. — Green Bay Packers linebacker Clay Matthews does not understand why he was flagged — yet again — for roughing the passer, this time while sacking Washington’s Alex Smith on Sunday. Matthews think it’s an indication that the NFL is “getting soft.”Even Smith wasn’t quite sure about the call that came late in the third quarter of Washington’s 31-17 victory. Neither were other players — or the coaches — from both teams. Matthews broke free into the backfield, grabbed Smith with both arms and took down the QB in a seemingly straightforward manner.ADVERTISEMENT Tiger Woods caps off amazing comeback with a win MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Matthews immediately put his arms up and slapped himself in the helmet as the flag was thrown. Packers coach Mike McCarthy threw down a play-calling sheet and argued with two officials about the call, yelling while chasing one along the sideline.“I think Clay did exactly what he’s supposed to do there,” McCarthy said. “He hit him with his shoulder. He was coming full speed off of a block. He braced himself. So I was fine with what Clay did.”In Green Bay’s 29-29 tie against the Minnesota Vikings last week, a potentially win-sealing interception for the Packers was wiped out by a roughing call on Matthews when he hit Kirk Cousins.“Unfortunately, this league is going in a direction that a lot of people don’t like. I think they’re getting soft. The only thing hard about this league is the fines they levy down on guys like me that play the game hard,” said Matthews, who actually was not docked pay for that hit on Cousins. “Maybe now pass rushers, guys getting after the quarterback, you’ll just have to attack the ball.”Smith’s take on the hit he took from Matthews?ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES “I’m glad I don’t play defense. … They can’t hit us in the head and can’t hit us in the knees when we’re in the pocket. It’s tough. I felt like he was playing football. He’s played a long time. Hit me right in the strike zone,” Smith said. “That’s the new rule they put in, though, with these guys finishing quarterbacks to the ground.”The rule preventing defenders from landing on the QB has been around since 1995, but the league’s competition committee made it a point of emphasis this year. More than 30 roughing-the-passer penalties were called in this season’s first two weeks.“Every week,” Redskins coach Jay Gruden said, “there seems to be another one that’s a little bit questionable.”With a heavy sigh, Matthews said: “Nine years, I’ve been doing it one way in the NFL, successfully, and now it just seems as if that way doesn’t work anymore. And that’s frustrating.”Not surprisingly, Packers teammates agreed with Matthews. Perhaps more surprisingly, so did several members of the Redskins.“Oh, my gosh. Look, I’m glad it was for us, but then when I looked at it, I was like: What else do you want the man to do? Seriously, what else do you want the man to do?” Redskins cornerback Josh Norman said. “When I saw it, it was not malicious, ill intent. It was just a nice form tackle. … I’m lost by it. I’m pretty sure (Matthews) is frustrated and he has a point.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “When you’re tackling a guy from the front, you’re going to land on him. I understand the spirit of the rule. When you have a hit like that, that’s a football play. I even went up to Alex Smith after the game and asked him: What do you think? What can I do differently?” Matthews said.“That’s a football play. I hit him from the front, got my head across, wrapped up. I’ve never heard of anybody tackling somebody without any hands. When he gives himself up as soon as you hit him, your body weight is going to go on him.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThere are sure to be more questions and more debate around the NFL about what constitutes a penalty on such plays.“I had judged that the defender landed on the quarterback, when he was tackling him, with most or all of his body weight, and that’s not allowed,” referee Craig Wrolstad said, according to a pool report. “That was basically my key — that he landed on him with most or all of his body weight.” Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Religious divide at heart of bitter Celtic-Rangers rivalry

first_img0Shares0000Celtic and Rangers are the dominant forces in the Scottish Premiership © AFP/File / GRAHAM STUARTGLASGOW, United Kingdom, May 21 – Celtic and Rangers have exerted a vice-like grip on Scottish football for a century but their bitter rivalry is underpinned by sectarian tensions that predate the existence of either Glasgow club.The ferocious passion generated when the teams clash in the Old Firm derby makes global headlines but behind it is a hatred whose roots can be found in Scotland’s history of religion and immigration. The Scottish reformation movement of the 16th century saw the previously pious Catholic nation of Scotland adopting Protestantism as its national religion.Religious hostilities existed for the next 300 years. Tensions were further stoked by an influx of both Catholic and Protestant immigrants from the north of Ireland during the 19th and early 20th century.Duncan Morrow, a lecturer in politics at the University of Ulster, was asked by the Scottish government in 2011 to chair the independent Advisory Group on Tackling Sectarianism in Scotland.Celtic have won seven Scottish Premiership titles in a row © AFP/File / ANDY BUCHANAN“Irish immigration to the industries of central Scotland brought with it sectarian rivalries and stirred a cultural anti-Catholicism, and even anti-Protestantism, that infected the workplace, local politics and the shape of social life for generations,” he told AFP.“Rivalries develop between football clubs everywhere but the big difference in Glasgow was the clubs associated with this sectarian rivalry.”Celtic were founded in 1887 by a Marist (Catholic) Brother from Ireland and the club’s origins were firmly embedded in Irish Catholicism.Rangers, founded in 1872, became the team of the Scottish Protestant working class almost by accident.At first, relations between the two clubs were cordial, with Rangers supplying the opposition for their neighbours’ first game.– No Catholics –However, the opening of a huge shipyard in Govan, just a short walk from Rangers’ Ibrox home, by industrial firm Harland and Wolff, saw an influx of workers from Belfast in the 1910s. The company’s infamous “Catholics need not apply” policy soon spread to the club their workforce adopted.The clubs’ identities were shaped in direct opposition to each other, with Celtic associated with socialism and Irish Republicanism, Rangers with conservatism and Northern Irish unionism.Rangers supporters wave Union Jack flags at Ibrox © AFP/File / Ian MacNicol, Ian MacNicolThis was reflected in the songs the clubs’ supporters adopted, which have tended to use the political events being played out in Northern Ireland as their inspiration.The signing of former Celtic player Mo Johnston in 1989 brought Rangers’ boycott of Catholic players to an end.For a time it seemed as if the religious-inspired rancour was being pushed to the margins in their rivalry in a more secular society.But the rise of social media, opposing views over the Scottish independence referendum and Rangers’ 2012 liquidation have led to heightened tensions in recent years.“In a time where religion is less important in society it is almost as if it has become part of the identity of football in Scotland,” said Morrow. “In a sense, sectarianism now is a way of behaving rather than a way of believing.”Morrow added there is evidence that violence spikes when sectarian rituals are played out in the street or at stadiums.Former Celtic manager Neil Lennon was subjected to sectarian abuse © AFP/File / LLUIS GENE“If you speak to young people, if you look at social media and visit some places in central Scotland then you can see that sectarianism is still there in communities,” he said.It is an issue that former Celtic manager and player Neil Lennon can relate to after enduring sectarian abuse during his career in Scotland.In 2002, a year after signing for the Hoops, Lennon, a Catholic, stopped playing international football for Northern Ireland, where the majority of the population are Protestants, following a death threat.In 2011, while manager of the Parkhead club, he was sent parcel bombs and bullets in the post and when he quit in 2014 he said he had become worn down by the abuse.But speaking after the Old Firm fixture at Ibrox in March, where sectarian singing was heard and fans clashed in Glasgow city centre, Lennon said he believes the situation is improving.“In my opinion it has got better but maybe that’s because I’m out of the Glasgow goldfish bowl,” the current Hibernian manager said.“There is no place for sectarianism any more. Some people use football as a vehicle to vent their frustrations or beliefs. But not many people want to listen to it any more.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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