First week of monitoring public media during election campaign shows relatively fair coverage but adjustments needed

first_img Help by sharing this information RSF backs joint op-ed by 120 West African media and journalists calling for Beninese journalist’s release May 20, 2021 Find out more RSF_en After its first week of monitoring media coverage of Mauritania’s election, Reporters Without Borders today said it was pleased to report that the public media are apportioning their coverage of the 19 candidates in a relatively equitable manner. Adjustments are nonetheless desirable. News Organisation The role of public media journalists assigned to cover candidates often lends itself to confusion, with some broadcast journalists speaking on behalf of candidates in the free spots. In the absence of any clarification, viewers and listeners are not in a position to say whether these journalists are acting in a personal capacity or as public media representatives.RecommendationsIn the light of the results obtained during the first week of the campaign, Reporters Without Borders recommends that:- Aside from the individual candidate spots and announcements, the air time and newspaper space assigned to candidates should be adjusted by public media editors during the second week of the campaign so that it is distributed more equally. They should also pay particular attention to the “minor candidates” whose campaigns were not adequately covered during the first week.- The HAPA and radio and TV directors should ensure that journalists assigned to cover candidates refrain from promoting any of these candidates.____________________Monitoring role. Reporters Without Borders is monitoring the electoral coverage of the public media – the public radio and TV stations, the Horizons and Chaab daily newspapers and the Agence Mauritanienne d’Information – from 24 February and until the end of the presidential election. The public media have been chosen because they are subject to the electoral law, which guarantees equal access to all the candidates and parties participating. As a public service financed by the state, they have to a duty to behave in an exemplary manner during the elections. News News Mauritanian reporter held for two days over Facebook post MauritaniaAfrica Receive email alerts After its first week of monitoring media coverage of Mauritania’s election, Reporters Without Borders today said it was pleased to report that the public media are apportioning their coverage of the 19 candidates in a relatively equitable manner. This is reflected in the implementation of the requirements of the High Authority for Press and Broadcasting (HAPA), above all that each candidate should receive free newspaper space and air time.Also the government has complied with the requirement to adopt a lower profile during the campaign, which has been reflected in the fact that the broadcast media have dedicated more of their news programmes to the candidates (41 hours, 56 min, 53 sec) than to government activities (28 hours, 44 min, 38 sec).Adjustments are nonetheless desirable. Aside from the individual candidate spots and announcements, there has been a slight imbalance in favour of certain candidates in air time and newspaper space in the public media.- RADIO AND TV: The state TV news programmes gave more air time to two candidates – Sidi Mohamed Ould Cheikh Abdellahi (44 min, 11 sec) and Messoud Ould Boulkheir (44 min, 4 sec). Overall, they had a total of 15 minutes more than the other candidates during the week, a little more than two minutes a day. The state radio’s “Campaign Report” gave most time to Ould Abdellahi (27 min, 43 sec) but not a lot more than the others.- PRINT MEDIA AND NEWS AGENCY: The Arabic-language daily Chaab and the French-language daily Horizons assigned slightly more of their available space to Ahmed Ould Daddah – 10.32 per cent, against 9.50 per cent to Mohamed Ould Mohamed El Mokhtar Ould Tomi and 9.40 per cent to Mohamed Ould Maouloud. The state news agency AMI evinced a similar bias, with 14.14 per cent of its dispatches referring to Ould Daddah, as against 11.11 per cent to Ould Abdellahi and around 8 per cent to most of the other candidates.- Finally, some candidates received little media coverage aside from the individual spots and announcements. This was above the case with Isselmou Ould El Moustapha, Ba Mamadou Alassane, Rachid Moustapha, Mohamed Ould Ghoulam Ould Sidati, Sidi Ould Isselmou Ould Mohamed Ahid, and Ethmane Ould Cheikh Ahmed Ebi El Maali. The imbalance was attributable in part to the fact that these candidates or their parties had fewer campaign activities.It should be noted that one candidate used the national flag during his free television spots. The electoral law forbids this, and it was stopped after the HAPA intervened. to go further News Follow the news on Mauritania Method of working. Reporters Without Borders calculates the time candidates are being covered and the time they are speaking on the air on all Mauritanian TV and radio news programmes. The organisation also measures the square centimetres of page space they are assigned in the Horizons and Chaab daily newspapers, and the number of references made to them in AMI dispatches. Air time: Includes speaking time and the duration of all forms of coverage (quotes, reports, comments, studio interviews and so on). Speaking time: Time spent by candidates or their representatives speaking directly on the air.The monitoring is being carried out with financial support from the European Union and the International Organisation of Francophone Countries (OIF). Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world July 6, 2020 Find out more MauritaniaAfrica March 6, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 First week of monitoring public media during election campaign shows relatively fair coverage but adjustments needed March 13, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Japan again bans US beef over BSE fears

first_img Dec 12, 2005, CIDRAP News story “Japan ends BSE-related ban on US beef” Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi announced the renewed ban Jan 20, just a few weeks after shipments had resumed in mid-December. US Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns called the presence of the spine material “an unacceptable failure on our part” to honor the agreement with Japan and promised to take corrective actions. Johanns said he had ordered additional USDA inspections at plants that process beef for export. He also promised to: Order unannounced inspections at facilities that produce beef for export. The Japanese Agriculture Ministry said inspectors found cattle backbone material in 3 of 41 boxes in a 389-kilogram shipment of beef from Atlantic Veal & Lamb Inc., according to a Jan 20 Associated Press (AP) report. The firm is located in Brooklyn, N.Y., other reports said. Investigate the violation and report to the Japanese on the findings and corrective actions. When he was asked if he viewed the renewed import ban as an overreaction, Johanns replied, “I do not believe so at all. . . . In some situations we have taken the same sort of action where we would close borders.” Transcript of Jan 20 USDA press conference Atlantic Veal & Lamb has been barred from shipping beef to Japan, Johanns said. “We will take the appropriate personnel action against the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service [FSIS] employee who conducted the inspection of the product in question and approved it for shipment into the Japanese marketplace,” he added. In a Jan 20 news conference, Johanns said backbones from cattle younger than 20 months are not classified as SRM under US regulations, but the agreement with Japan banned all cattle backbones. “Very clearly what we have learned about this shipment is that it failed to meet the terms of the agreement,” he said, according to a transcript. Provide for further training of FSIS inspectors on export requirements. Jan 23, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Japan has again banned American beef following the discovery last week of cattle spine material in an imported shipment, a violation of the recent bilateral agreement designed to keep beef tainted with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) out of Japan. Japan cut off imports of US beef after the nation’s first case of BSE was found in a Canadian-born cow in Washington state in December 2003. Japan officially agreed on Dec 12, 2005, to resume imports of beef from cattle no more than 20 months old. The agreement required the removal of specified risk materials (SRM)—tissues likely to be contaminated in BSE-infected animals—such as the brain, eyes, vertebral column, spinal cord, and tonsils. Send a team to work with the Japanese to reexamine US beef already in Japan to confirm compliance with the agreement. In a statement, Atlanatic Veal & Lamb said, “We regret that there was a misinterpretation of the export requirements and an honest mistake involving a very small amount of product that has led to this degree of concern.” “This just simply should not have happened,” he said. Atlantic Veal & Lamb statementhttp://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/statement-of-atlantic-veal-and-lamb-on-suspension-of-ability-to-export-53683637.html See also: The inspector who approved the meat for shipment to Japan “for whatever reason just did not connect to the fact that the vertebral column needed to be removed before it arrived in Japan,” Johanns said. The company said it was “absolutely confident” that the product was safe. “It is important to note that Atlantic Veal produces veal derived from very young animals—animals that have never tested positive for BSE. We estimate that the veal we shipped came from animals who were less than 4 1/2 months of age,” the statement said.last_img read more

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