Hard water for Oxford

first_imgIncidentally, this geological divide separates Yorkshire into a harder east and a softer west, meaning the popular tea-makers named after their home county have taps with both strands at their manufacturing plants. One tea-drinking student, who wished to remain anonymous, described this as “good news” for them and fellow beverage fans as it meant those who lived in soft water areas were not forced to change their tea brand when coming up to study. Unfortunately, hard water does also produce limescale in kettles, and one student expressed personal irritation that Oxford’s hard water had ruined their almost decade-old kettle. Newly published research has suggested that Oxford has some of the UK’s hardest water. Harvey Water Softeners have conducted the 2020 Hard Water Index with the aim to ranking places across the country by their hardness of water. Hard water is water in possession of a high mineral content. Water’s hardness is a product of its travel through various levels of chalk, limestone and gypsum. As these are largely made of calcium and magnesium carbonates, bicarbonates and sulphates, water found to contain more of these is thought to be harder than that water which lacks them: socalled “soft water”. Rain is naturally soft, and water’s hardness is a consequence of rainfall being soaked into the ground. The Index determined the hardness of the water by measuring the number of milligrams of calcium carbonate per litre for each area investigated. Oxford’s water possesses 295mg per litre. center_img According to the index, Ipswich has the hardest water in the UK and Edinburgh the softest. Places with water similar in hardness to Oxford reportedly include Swindon and Southampton. Around 60% of the UK is thought to have hard or very hard water, according to Thames Water. Oxford is not alone in being one of many areas exhibiting over 200mg of calcium carbonate per litre. The South and East of England have the hardest water in the country, as they have regions of chalk and limestone which transfer more minerals into water than the primarily granite-based areas of the North and West. last_img read more

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Live in Hamptons style luxury in the Avenues

first_imgThe home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.“There’s a real sense of community,” she said.“Your neighbours are genuine friends and everyone looks out for each other. We’ll miss that.” Inside 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said the couple moved into the home in 2014, and renovated three years later.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours ago“We wanted to live in it before making any changes,” she said.“That was the best decision we ever made. Open plan living and dining at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said it was the neighbourhood that prompted them to buy the rundown 1920s post-war home.“It was the worst house in the best street,” she said. Natural light and air fills 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.There are two bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, plus master suite with walk-in wardrobe and ensuite plus an office, bathroom, separate toilet and laundry and additional living room. The dreamy kitchen at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.The property is spread over two levels and sits on a 655sq m block. Upon entry, there is a large open-plan living and dining area and kitchen with butler’s pantry. Multiple living areas at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.On the lower level, there are two bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, plus rumpus room, bathroom, workshop and covered deck. center_img 88 Mareeba Rd, AshgroveLocated in the family-friendly streets of Ashgrove, this home has been exquisitely renovated and maintained. Hamptons style interiors fill the home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.“Now all the main living areas and kitchen are right at the front of the house. “We love having these rooms so close to the street. It’s the most wonderful neighbourhood and we wanted that connection to be part of the home.” Inside 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Ms Howlett said the separate living areas would appeal to buyers.“This layout makes it a great buy for growing families,” she said.Ms Howlett said she would miss the neighbourhood. The home at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove.Owners Sue Howlett and Leigh Fitzsimmons bought the property at 88 Mareeba Rd, Ashgrove, in 2008.last_img read more

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Dutch regulator growing too powerful, Pensions Federation warns

first_imgHe said he was particularly worried that, in practice, pension scheme boards would no longer determine such things as the timing of the spreading of financial shocks – and that the DNB would make those decisions instead.Riemen argued that pension schemes could be subject a strict “scaled” planning that would severely curb policymaking freedom.In that event, the industry’s fears would be realised, “as pension fund trustee boards would no longer be allowed to take responsibility”.He added: “The DNB can force pension funds to change their investment strategy. It doesn’t literally say so in the Memorandum of Explanation, but there is a real risk this may happen.” Draft legislation for a new financial assessment framework (nFTK) in the Netherlands has “some positive elements”, but there is a real danger the pensions regulator (DNB) will be given too much power to decide schemes’ investment strategies, the Pensions Federation has warned.Gerard Riemen, director at the Pensions Federation, said he was pleased the draft legislation included such elements as the spreading of financial shocks over time, a 12-month average funding rate and complete pension contracts, in addition to measures to promote contribution-level stability.He said the draft law also showed that Jetta Klijnsma, state secretary of Social Affairs and Labour, had “listened to the industry”, as the proposals included the smoothing of contribution levels by applying expected returns, and allowed schemes to make up indexation shortfalls without submitting to the new rules that will apply to indexation going forward.However, Riemen said he was concerned pension fund trustee boards would have little room to set policy if pension contracts set every detail in stone.last_img read more

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Man City Makes Mendy the Most Expensive Defender with £52m Deal

first_imgTRANSFER NEWS…Benjamin Mendy has completed his £52m transfer from Monaco to Manchester City to become the world’s most expensive defender.The 23-year-old France left-back has signed a five-year deal with the club. Mendy is City’s fifth major signing of the summer and takes their spending to more than £200m.“He is undoubtedly one of the world’s best full-backs, our number one target in this position,” said director of football Txiki Begiristain.Mendy played 34 times for Monaco last season and helped them to their first Ligue 1 title in 17 years after joining them from Marseille last summer.He is the Premier League club’s fifth major signing of the summer following the recruitment of England right-back Kyle Walker for £45m, plus a potential £5m of add-ons, Portugal midfielder Bernardo Silva (£43m), Brazilian keeper Ederson Moraes (£35m) and defender Danilo from Real Madrid (£26.5m).They have sold left-back Aleksandar Kolarov, 31, to Roma for £4.5m.The arrival of Mendy leaves Manchester City with the most expensive defensive line-up in world football.When Ederson moved to the club from Benfica earlier this summer, his move was a world record for a keeper in sterling, although not in euros.Mendy and Walker have been added to a backline which also includes centre-back John Stones, who was bought for £47.5m from Everton last summer,with the trio making up three of the world’s five most expensive defenders.Central defenders Nicolas Otamendi and Eliaquim Mangala, who spent last season on loan at Valencia, also joined City for fees believed to be in the region of £32m.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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