RCAs Airenergy charger converts WiFi energy to electricity

first_img Citation: RCA’s Airenergy charger converts WiFi energy to electricity (2010, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-rca-airenergy-charger-wifi-energy.html Harvesting electricity from signals in the air is not new, as anyone who ever built a crystal radio running only on the radio signals it received can testify, but until now no device has been able to harvest enough electricity to make it of practical use. In most modern cities WiFi signal hotspots abound, which might make the Airenergy device a viable option, although in rural areas WiFi sources are less widespread.A USB charger costing around $40, and about the size of a phone, is expected to be released later this year, with a WiFi-harvesting battery around the same size and price as an OEM battery available shortly after. (PhysOrg.com) — Airenergy is a gadget that can harvest free electricity from WiFi signals such as those from a wireless Internet connection, apparently with enough efficiency to make it practical for recharging devices such as mobile phones. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furthercenter_img Analyst cool on Chicago citywide WiFi plan At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas this week a RCA spokesman said they had been able to charge a BlackBerry from 30% charge to fully charged in around 90 minutes using only ambient WiFi signals as the power source, although it was unclear on whether the Airenergy battery was recharged in that time. The Airenergy recharging time depends on the proximity to the WiFi signal and the number of WiFi sources in the vicinity.The RCA Airenergy unit converts the WiFi antenna signal to DC power to recharge its own internal lithium battery, so it automatically recharges itself whenever the device is anywhere near a WiFi hotspot. If you have a wireless network at home the Airenergy would recharge overnight virtually anywhere in your home. When you need to recharge your phone or other device you plug the Airenergy battery into the phone via USB to transfer the charge. © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

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High school student develops supercapacitor wins Young Scientist Award

first_img Explore further (Phys.org) —Saratoga California high school student Eesha Khare is a co-winner of this year’s Young Scientist Award sponsored by Intel. She won the award for her battery-sized supercapacitor design which allows for recharging in just a few seconds. The award was part of Intel’s International Science and Engineering Fair. Top winner Ionut Budisteanu, 19, of Romania (center) with second-place winners Eesha Khare, 18, of Saratoga, Calif. (left) and Henry Lin, 17, of Shreveport, La. celebrate their awards at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the world’s largest high school science research competition. More than 1,600 high schoolers from 70 countries, regions and territories competed for more than $4 million in awards this week. Engineers craft new material for high-performing ‘supercapacitors’ More information: www.intel.com/content/www/us/e … ng-fair/winners.html Citation: High school student develops supercapacitor, wins Young Scientist Award (2013, May 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-high-school-student-supercapacitor-young.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Khare’s supercapacitor is meant to serve as a replacement for a small battery, specifically those used in cell phones. She says the inspiration for her design came out of frustration from constantly finding her cell phone battery dead. The supercapacitor she developed is small enough to fit inside a standard cell phone battery housing, and can be fully charged in just 20 to 30 seconds. As if that weren’t enough, it also has a much longer useful life offering 10,000 charge/recharge cycles instead of the 1,000 available now for batteries. The supercapacitor is based on nanochemistry, which Khare told the crowd during her acceptance speech is her main area of scientific interest.As cell phones have grown smarter and more powerful, concern has grown over the ability of battery development to keep up. Khare’s supercapacitor suggests that perhaps there is a better way. Capacitors are devices used to store an electronic charge—though typically little more than conductors separated by an insulator, they are an essential component of most electronic devices. They help regulate the flow of electricity. They can also be used as a battery, however, as Khare’s device demonstrates. Thus far, hers is only capable of powering an LED, but that is likely to change with advances in nano-technology.The award comes with a $50,000 cash prize, which Khare will likely use for college; although, this prize might also help her win a scholarship. She plans to continue her research on the supercapacitor with the ultimate goal of replacing her cell phone battery. She noted that such a supercapacitor would also be useful for powering a wide variety of other devices, adding that it’s also flexible. It could be used to power devices embedded in clothes, she suggested, or as part of roll-top electronic devices. © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

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