Masca – Los Gigantes – Masca – a real adventure — Geocache of the Week

first_imgMulti-CacheGC10A3Tby lacruz18 Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Location:Islas Canarias, SpainN 28° 18.089′ W 016° 50.411′ The Masca Gorge is a Nature Conservation ZoneSome Multi-Caches are quick grabs that you can find during your lunch break, while others are much more labor intensive, taking you through multiple neighborhoods, around winding forests, or even requiring a drive to a different city. This T5 Multi-Cache, located in Spain’s Canary Islands, will send you on a three-hour long trek through a basaltic ravine to an isolated beach.The journey begins in Masca, a small mountain village on the island of Tenerife. Home to only 90 inhabitants, the village is situated 650 meters (2130 feet) above sea level in the Macizo de Teno mountains.The town of Masca lies deep in the Macizo de Teno mountainsAs you pass through the gorge to the first and second waypoints, you’ll meander over trickling streams, duck through tunnels made of volcanic rock, and admire the wide varieties of plants that flourish in the ravine’s microclimates. The enormous cliffs that form the ravine, known as Acantilados de Los Gigantes (“Cliffs of the Giants”), were formed 5 to 7 million years ago by volcanic lava flows and guide you on your journey to the ocean.The end of the arduous journey is the picturesque Playa de Masca. If you packed a picnic, you can enjoy it on the rocks after cooling off in the waters of the Masca Bay. This area of the Atlantic Ocean is popular among divers for its exceptional marine wildlife.At last, the final destination: the Playa de Masca!After finding the cache, the most ambitious geocachers will turn back and make the long journey back up the ravine to the starting point. For the rest of us, there are taxi boats offering regular rides back to the village nearby. Before embarking on your journey, be sure to stock up on water, snacks, and other necessities, as there are no convenience stores along the way.The walk to the cache is gorge-ous!Keep an eye out for some of these muggles who may be around to greet you on your journey! 1234<> SharePrint RelatedTop 10 Geocaches of the Week 2017December 27, 2017In “Geocache of the Week”GeoTour Azores (GT6F)November 13, 2018In “GeoTours”Geocaching country souvenir: ArgentinaDecember 4, 2017In “Community” Difficulty:4Terrain:5last_img read more

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IBM and The Internet of Things

first_imgIn the Web world, you know that a trend has major traction when IBM is all over it. Like any large Internet company, Big Blue is careful about which trends it latches onto. It was a good couple of years before they were spotted at the Web 2.0 conference, for example. However in the case of Internet of Things, IBM is proving itself to be an unusually early adopter. I recently spoke to Andy Stanford-Clark, a Master Inventor and Distinguished Engineer at IBM. Yesterday we wrote about how Stanford-Clark has hooked his house up to Twitter. Today we delve more into what his employer, IBM, is doing with the Internet of Things.IBM is involved in some very interesting projects at the intersection of two big trends we’ve been tracking in 2009: The Real-time Web and Internet of Things. They have a website devoted to this topic, called A Smarter Planet. As the name implies, it focuses on environmental matters such as energy and food systems. Sensors, RFID tags and real-time messaging software are major parts of IBM’s smarter planet strategy. The catchcry for the site – Instrumented, Interconnected, and Intelligent – is about outfitting the world with sensors and hooking them to the Internet to apply the ‘smarts.’IBM has a whole set of RFID and sensor technology solutions. But more importantly it has been busy working with various manufacturers and goods suppliers in recent months, to introduce those solutions to the world. This month IBM made an agreement with Matiq, an IT subsidiary of Norway’s largest food supplier Nortura. The project involves using RFID (radio frequency identification) technology to track and trace poultry and meat products “from the farm, through the supply chain, to supermarket shelves.” This food tracking solution will help ensure that meat and chicken are “kept in optimal condition throughout the supply chain.” The system uses IBM’s WebSphere RFID Information Center, together with IBM’s sensor and actuator solutions.A similar project is one that IBM announced at the end of June with Danish transportation company Container Centralen. By February 2010, Container Centralen undertakes to use IBM sensor technology “to allow participants in the horticultural supply chain to track the progress of shipments as they move from growers to wholesalers and retailers across 40 countries in Europe.” Specifically this refers to transportation of things like flowers and pot plants, which are very sensitive to the environment they travel in. Having sensors as part of the entire travel chain will allow participants to monitor conditions and climate during travel. Essentially it makes the travel process very transparent. richard macmanus Tags:#Analysis#Internet of Things#NYT#Trends#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… As Andy Stanford-Clark explained to ReadWriteWeb, using RFID technology to monitor temparature when transporting flowers ensures that no short cuts are taken by some in the supply chain (e.g. turning off the climate control for a while to save money). It gives more data to make decisions, for example it may enable a retailer to refuse to accept a shipment if the sensor data suggests the flowers are close to wilting.IBM is also working with German car manufacturer Volkswagen to add sensor technology to its operations. The aim is to improve Volkswagen’s material logistics operations through the use of sensor technology. For example, shipping containers carrying auto parts for Volkswagen will be fitted with RFID tags. So far about 3,000 shipping containers have been fitted with RFID tags.These are all exciting developments in the Internet of Things, because they impact real-world processes. It’s great to see a large technology company like IBM at the forefront of this trend. It’s a very smart move (pardon the pun), because in 2009 we’re only at the very start of connecting almost any object in the world to the Internet. Imagine a world with millions, perhaps trillions, of sensors that use IBM technology – because that’s what Big Blue is imagining. Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Lynching accused yet to be identified

first_imgThree days after a mob killed an alleged rapist of a nine-year-old girl in Punjab’s Jalandhar, the police have not yet been able to identify the accused.Police said a case against “unidentified persons” has been registered under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code and investigation was under way.“So far no arrests have been made. We are yet to identify the accused who were part of the mob that killed 39-year-old Pappu Kumar, who they caught raping the minor girl,” Harsimrat Singh, Assistant Commissioner of Police, Jalandhar, told The Hindu on Wednesday.“We have examined the CCTV footage in the area but could not gather much about the suspects,” Mr. Singh said.last_img

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Errant Pune builders may face MCOCA

first_imgWith two wall collapse incidents claiming 21 lives in three days, the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) is considering invoking the Maharashtra Control of Organised Crimse Act (MCOCA) against errant builders to curb illegal constructions.“We are thinking of invoking the MCOCA against such builders,” PMC city engineer Prashant Waghmare told The Hindu, when asked to comment on reports that the civic body was planning to use the stringent law against builders and developers who had carried out more than one unauthorised construction. “But we are yet to take a final call on this,” he said.Officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the civic body would likely first serve notices under Sections 53 and 54 of the Maharashtra Regional Town Planning (MRTP) Act against such builders and then consider invoking MCOCA if they failed to comply.ScepticalA city-based labour organisation, however, was sceptical of the PMC’s intentions and charged the civic body of considering “absurd deterrents” to cover-up its own failures and laxity. “It might be pertinent to ask how the PMC’s invocation of the MCOCA against builders will stand up in court,” said Jayant Shinde of the Bandhkaam Kamgar Sena. “There have been at least 500 labourer deaths in construction site accidents in the city since 2009, yet the PMC has failed to bring even a single builder to book for negligence. And now, its authorities talk big about invoking MCOCA,” he said.‘Officials failed’Pointing out that in most cases, guilty builders usually managed to get off the hook after construction-related accidents, Mr. Shinde asserted that the PMC’s tough talk stemmed out of panic. “The PMC’s officials have failed in their own duty. This time, the magnitude of the accidents, in so short a time span, has exposed their shoddiness. Hence, in an attempt to pacify public ire directed at them, they are straining to appear tough by talking of invoking laws generally applicable to hardened criminals,” Mr. Shinde said. Fifteen people comprising construction workers and their kin, including four children and two women, were killed and two others injured after a section of the compound wall of the Alcon Stylus housing society in Kondhwa collapsed on their makeshift shanties adjacent to it, in the early hours of June 29.In a similar tragedy soon after, six more construction workers, including two women, lost their lives while four people were injured after the compound wall of the Sinhgad group of Institutes in Ambegaon collapsed on the labourers’ tin huts adjoining the wall in the wee hours of July 2.Jolted by the twin mishaps, the PMC has begun a drive to check on 290-odd under-construction sites and the safety conditions of workers living in transit camps there. It has also served notices of suspension of registration on two developers following the Kondhwa wall collapse incident.last_img read more

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