Moguls-to-be get first-hand look

first_imgThe class’s instructor, Nick Bogardus, 28, of Orange, a music manager himself, brought the curriculum to Biola for the first time this year. But the school already had strong ties to the music industry, he said. “A lot of the artists and bands I work with went to Biola, so I saw this school as a good place for talent,” he said. The knowledge students garnered from Bogardus’ class took to the stage last week when his students put on their first live concert. Three bands managed by the students performed in Anaheim. “A music manager has their hands in everything that has to do with \ artist’s career,” said Lindsay Phelps, who took on the role of manager for piano rock artist Rhinestone Fargus. “You have to learn how to talk to people and get interviews and other things … ” Student C.J. Casciotta, 21, said that as part of the course he and his classmates met with executives at major record companies, including Capitol Records and BMI, to get first-hand pointers about the industry. LA MIRADA – Plenty of photographs and promotional pieces. Lots of interviews. And even more scheduling and organizing. Such is the life of a music mogul, and a group of Biola University students is learning that, when it comes to success in the music industry, it’s all in the details, baby. “It’s honestly about the importance of organization and hard work,” said junior Kevin Kilpatrick, 21, one of about 15 students enrolled in Biola’s new music management course. “When you’re organized, it’s easier to work harder, because you know what you need to work on,” he added. “I’m trying to give them a well-rounded view of the industry so they’re looking at it through a wide-angle lens,” said Bogardus. Bogardus, who founded his own record label, New Noise Management, said his goal is to teach students about the importance of creating a buzz around a band. “They have to be able to create a story, build a story and tell a story,” he said. “Basically, management and entertainment is branding. It’s recognizing special things about a band and being able to communicate that to fans and open more doors for them.” Phelps said Bogardus’ class has encouraged her to pursue her dream of a career in the music industry. “It’s been a little bit easier than I thought,” she said. “I don’t think it’s an easy job, but I guess I’ve gotten a lot more confident in myself.” [email protected] (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3024 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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RCAs Airenergy charger converts WiFi energy to electricity

first_img Citation: RCA’s Airenergy charger converts WiFi energy to electricity (2010, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-rca-airenergy-charger-wifi-energy.html Harvesting electricity from signals in the air is not new, as anyone who ever built a crystal radio running only on the radio signals it received can testify, but until now no device has been able to harvest enough electricity to make it of practical use. In most modern cities WiFi signal hotspots abound, which might make the Airenergy device a viable option, although in rural areas WiFi sources are less widespread.A USB charger costing around $40, and about the size of a phone, is expected to be released later this year, with a WiFi-harvesting battery around the same size and price as an OEM battery available shortly after. (PhysOrg.com) — Airenergy is a gadget that can harvest free electricity from WiFi signals such as those from a wireless Internet connection, apparently with enough efficiency to make it practical for recharging devices such as mobile phones. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furthercenter_img Analyst cool on Chicago citywide WiFi plan At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas this week a RCA spokesman said they had been able to charge a BlackBerry from 30% charge to fully charged in around 90 minutes using only ambient WiFi signals as the power source, although it was unclear on whether the Airenergy battery was recharged in that time. The Airenergy recharging time depends on the proximity to the WiFi signal and the number of WiFi sources in the vicinity.The RCA Airenergy unit converts the WiFi antenna signal to DC power to recharge its own internal lithium battery, so it automatically recharges itself whenever the device is anywhere near a WiFi hotspot. If you have a wireless network at home the Airenergy would recharge overnight virtually anywhere in your home. When you need to recharge your phone or other device you plug the Airenergy battery into the phone via USB to transfer the charge. © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

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