Many opportunities to capitalise on in oil sector – PSC

first_img…states need for entrepreneurial skills to be revisedAlthough there have been concerns over whether local companies would be able to tap into the benefits of the emerging oil and gas industry in Guyana, the Private Sector Commission (PSC) has claimed that while there might not be much locally available technical capacity and expertise, there are avenues in which local companies could offer services to this new industry.PSC Chairman Eddie Boyer said that local entrepreneurs must understand thatPSC Chairman Eddie Boyerthere was no substitute for what was required. As such, he said companies must develop the skill to understand what was required and adopt best practices to this new industry, if they were really going to benefit.While Boyer acknowledged the fact that there might be competition from neighbouring Trinidad, which is an oil and gas producer, he said given the expertise and knowledge available to local businesses, everyone could and would enjoy the fruits of the new world that was about to open up.“We need to learn about this industry as much as we can, in the little time that we have, to keep our engine of growth purring. As a caution though, we should not invest blindly because of promises of prosperity but exercise due diligence and assess the investment risks,” he cautioned while addressing an oil and gas seminar held on Tuesday at Duke Lodge.The PSC Head said a lot has already been said about the sector, and while there were certain pros and cons, within it all there were mammoth opportunities for Guyanese as a whole. He, therefore, said that it was the duty of the PSC to ensure that members were aware of these opportunities. He said, “I do not believe that we are lacking in opportunities to capitalise in this emerging industry, nor do we need to start from scratch. There are many sources of expertise out there, and just as we invest to expand our businesses, we need to become more informed on this industry, we have to get critical information so that we can make better business decisions.”Further, Boyer stressed the need for entrepreneurial skills to be revised and addressed, because he said Guyana was too accustomed to doing business in a singular manner when an industry as large and as diverse as oil and gas would require a retooling of our energies.“We need to learn from countries that have been exposed to oil and gas and understand that there is a need for acquiring the expertise required to be competitive and successful. There is the Local Content Policy and we need to make as much use of this as possible,” he added.The PSC official suggested that partnerships should be developed to collaborate with different skills sets, and to get up to speed with the skills sets that may be lacking. While noting that oil and gas operations were capital intensive and hence, out of reach for most of us financially as individuals, Boyer said collectively and through joint ventures with local and international companies, everyone could benefit tremendously.“We need to master the technologies, and understand that if we are going to succeed, we must open our vision and grasp at the numerous opportunities which are available…The Local Content Policy, which we have heard so much about, must be beneficial to both parties, the suppliers of goods and services and the recipient of goods and services,” he added.This seminar on Tuesday brought together the experience of an oil and gas expert, Cuneyt Tirmandi, a consultant of the Canadian Executive Service Organisation (CESO), with worldwide working experience, with many other notable oil and gas-related officials.With presentations from ExxonMobil and the Centre for Local Business Development, participants were informed of current operations, developments and plans for Guyana and also briefed on opportunities for the local Private Sector.To complement these presentations, the Natural Resources Ministry also made a presentation on “Opportunities for the Private Sector and the Role of the Private Sector in Securing and Maximising Local Content” with discussions centred on perspectives, concerns, and interest.last_img read more

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“Both sides have to display maturity” – Jagdeo

first_imgThe parliamentary Opposition were conciliatory following the Government’s shocked defeat, when the No-confidence Motion was passed in the National Assembly on Friday evening.In an interview on the sidelines, Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo called for maturity. He also noted that the discussion for a presidential candidate will begin next week Thursday.According to Jagdeo, Friday’s events mean the process will be brought forward.“I don’t want to speak much about it at this point in time. We have to deal with this situation. It’s unprecedented in our country and both sides have to display maturity in addressing it. This is a feature of our Constitution.”“It was there since Forbes Burnham was President. It was used today in a democratic setting and the House voted in a particular way. So we have to respect our Constitution and the democratic process,” Jagdeo said.Asked about Persaud’s vote, Jagdeo noted that the PPP was hopeful one or two persons would use a conscience vote. In fact, Jagdeo expressed some surprise at Persaud’s vote.“I myself was a bit surprised about the way that he voted,” he said. “But he (Persaud) comes from the sugar belt. And I suspect that coming from the sugar belt and living in that community, he saw the hardship.”In an interview with Guyana Times afterwards, however, former Attorney General and Opposition frontbencher, Anil Nandlall also called for mature politics to prevail. He cited various no-confidence votes that were taken in the world, including in England.“We now have one here in Guyana for the first time since our independence. It is sincerely hoped that political leaders on both sides of the divide will now behave in the requisite maturity to take the country to the next stage, which is guide it over the next three months to a General and Regional Elections.”“We have to deal with the people out there. People may be hurt. People are enthusiastic. You have different types of emotions emanating from different people. Us, as leaders, must take the mantle of leadership and guide our country over this delicate process to ensure our Constitution is observed.”According to Nandlall, the motion followed the Constitution of Guyana and as a lawful vote, must be respected. He noted that by allowing the motion to run its course, Guyana’s democracy has been improved and the maturity of Parliament displayed.“We have just witnessed history,” Nandlall said. “We have just witnessed an unprecedented event, a feature of our Constitution being activated. That is what democracy and constitutional freedom is about.”Nandlall also stressed that Persaud exercised his right as a parliamentarian and as such, his vote must be respected. The MP expressed the hope that Persaud would be protected following his vote.“He has a right to vote in accordance with his conscience and policies and political beliefs. That is a fundamental right guaranteed to him by the Constitution. All of us have the freedom to support a party of our choice and express support in whichever forum.Persaud has chosen to exercise that right. And whether we like it or not is immaterial. What we must understand is that we must accept that. He is a citizen. And we hope that no danger will befall him and that he will be protected by the law abiding citizens and the security forces.”The next steps are spelt out in the constitution of Guyana. Article 106 (6) of the Constitution states: “The Cabinet including the President shall resign if the Government is defeated by the vote of a majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly on a vote of confidence.”Meanwhile, clause seven goes on to state that “Notwithstanding its defeat, the Government shall remain in office and shall hold an election within three months, or such longer period as the National Assembly shall by resolution supported by not less than two-thirds of the votes of all the elected members of the National Assembly determine, and shall resign after the President takes the oath of office following the election.”last_img read more

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