Moore hired as Bills wide receivers coach

first_imgOne day after Syracuse bolstered its passing game by signing five athletic receivers in its Class of 2014, it lost its wide receivers coach.Rob Moore, who spent the last four seasons with the Orange, was hired by the Buffalo Bills to fill the same position, the Bills announced Thursday morning. He becomes the sixth Doug Marrone assistant to follow the former SU head coach to “Syracuse West,” and will work under offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett again.“We celebrate Rob Moore’s opportunity to coach in the National Football League with the Buffalo Bills and look forward to recruiting the next best person to help our program attack the Atlantic Coast Conference in 2014,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said in a statement. “We have communicated our plan with our team and our National Letter of Intent signees. As soon as we hire our new coach, we look forward to introducing him to Cuse Nation.”Shafer said in a radio interview with The Score 1260 that offensive coordinator George McDonald will fill the position on an interim basis while the program searches for Moore’s replacement.“George is probably the best college coach I have been around when it comes to coaching and developing wide receivers,” Shafer said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMoore leaves a receivers group that struggled in 2013. After losing Adrian Flemming to a season-ending lower-body injury in its season opener, a depleted cast was unable to generate downfield threats. But with Jarrod West coming back for a fifth year, and a strong incoming quintet of pass catchers led by four-star signee K.J. Williams, the new group appears more fit for the open and dynamic offensive system SU is targeting next season.Coach Moore is not only a great coach but an amazing person. Changing lives everywhere he goes, and now to the Buffalo Bills! Congrats Coach— Macauley Hill (@Macauley_Hill) February 6, 2014 Comments Published on February 6, 2014 at 11:39 am Contact Stephen: [email protected] | @Stephen_Bailey1 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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LeBron James, Lakers prepare for more restrictions to ward off coronavirus

first_img Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years “I think people are making the adjustment, quite frankly,” he said. “I know our guys still do their signature handshakes and whatnot, but it’s really more of an elbow bump now when you greet people, and I just think that’s a smart thing to do.”If there’s one thing the Lakers are prepared for, it’s world events beyond their control. From a preseason trip to China during an awkward political situation to dealing with the trauma of Kobe Bryant’s sudden death, these Lakers have been tested by off-court events since the season began. In that sense, the coronavirus scare won’t rattle them, they suggested.“We specialize in dealing with unusual circumstances,” Vogel said. “So we have experience with it, and this will be no different.”HOWARD MISSES GAME; WAITERS CONTINUES WORKOUTSWhile the Lakers have been reasonably healthy of late, center Dwight Howard missed Tuesday’s game as a late scratch with an upset stomach. It was the first time all season Howard (7.5 ppg, 7.4 rpg) missed a game.Dion Waiters was a healthy scratch as he continues to be worked into playing shape: He’s only played three games this season, and Vogel suggested that he’s still trying to get his legs underneath him. While the Lakers were off on Monday, Waiters went through a shooting and conditioning workout. Vogel said he hoped to get Waiters as much five-on-five scrimmaging as possible before he makes his Lakers debut. EL SEGUNDO — Between defenders in his path and media huddled around his locker, the one thing LeBron James doesn’t get all that often is space.He’ll get some now in one of those scenarios: New NBA guidelines limiting players’ direct contact with media over COVID-19 concerns led to the Lakers roping off six feet of space between journalists and James at the Lakers’ practice facility on Tuesday morning. Even James felt the new arrangement was a little strange.“I miss you guys being right here in my bubble,” he said gesturing his arms in the space around him. “Very challenging to do an interview like this.”That’s the new world of the NBA and other pro sports leagues as of Tuesday, when the MLB, MLS and NHL also took steps to keep “non-essential” personnel out of locker rooms. It could be the first of many measures to insulate players and staff from the threat of coronavirus, which has health experts concerned over the possibility of a pandemic. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs The Lakers players had a meeting with the team doctor on Saturday, and other franchise employees were invited to a town hall meeting on COVID-19 on Monday. Staffers have been encouraged to decrease hand-to-hand contact, such as handshakes that are common in the NBA, and wash their hands thoroughly. There’s an increasing awareness that if a player or coach contracts the virus, it could represent an existential threat to the league this season.Vogel joked that he had embraced “dabbing” rather than handshakes, but said he thought the players and staff were treating the advice seriously.Related Articlescenter_img Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersOne of those options could be playing games without fans. The NBA’s board of governors should be discussing that this week in greater detail, ESPN reported, and teams are likely to be making plans for that possibility.For the Lakers, there are 20 games left in the regular season – conceivably, several of them could be in empty arenas. Coach Frank Vogel said he was taking the situation day-by-day, but conceded that “it looks like it is a possibility,” and that it looked more likely since the NBA first started talking about the issue last week.“Very strange,” he said. “But you gotta do what’s right under the circumstances and make the best of any situation, and if that’s what’s called for, then that’s what we’ll do.”While James notably said on Friday night that he wouldn’t play if fans couldn’t attend, by Tuesday, he had revised his position with the information that the NBA might mandate such a measure.“I had no idea that there was actually a conversation going behind closed doors about the particular virus,” he said. “Obviously I would be very disappointed not having the fans, because that is what I play for: I play for my family, I play for my fans. … But at the same time, you got to listen to the people that’s keeping a track on what’s going on. If they feel like it’s best for the safety of the players, the safety of the franchise, the safety of the league to mandate that, then we all listen to it.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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