Chelsea agree Eden Hazard sale, Liverpool chasing FC Koln pair and MORE gossip

first_imgHere are the top transfer-related stories in Saturday’s newspapers and online…Chelsea have agreed a deal in principle with Real Madrid over the transfer of Eden Hazard. The Belgian ace has been heavily linked with a move away from Stamford Bridge this summer, with Real and Paris Saint-Germain both keen on his signature. And the La Liga giants have won the race to sign him with sources close to the Bernabeu hierarchy claiming there is already an agreement in place. (Daily Express)Chelsea have failed with a £26million bid for Roma defender Kostas Manolas. However, the Italian giants have told them they will do business if they cough up £35million for the 24-year-old Greek international. (The Sun)Manchester City are trying to do a £20million summer deal for Borussia Dortmund wonderkid Julian Weigl. They were keen even before Pep Guardiola was confirmed as taking over at the Etihad but the incoming City boss is also an admirer. (Daily Mirror)Liverpool are aiming to complete a huge double swoop of FC Koln this summer. The Reds are interested in bringing in goalkeeper Timo Horn and defender Jonas Hector as Jurgen Klopp bids to rebuild the Liverpool team this summer. (Daily Mirror)Arsenal and Tottenham have sent scouts to watch Michy Batshuayi, the striker who has been a revelation for Marseille this season. (Daily Express)Arsenal are keeping an eye on Gonzalo Higuain as they look to add a top striker to their squad — with Zlatan Ibrahimovic also linked with a move to the Emirates. (The Sun)West Ham have sounded out Lyon about a £20m summer move for France striker Alexandre Lacazette. Lacazette, 24, has already admitted he fancies a move to the Premier League and West Ham are prepared to break the bank to get him. (Daily Mirror)Leicester will make a shock summer swoop for West Ham defender Reece Burke. And East Ender Burke, 19, is keen to join table-topping Foxes for a shot at Champions League football. Burke has played five league games for the Hammers and is currently on loan at League One Bradford. (The Sun)Former Arsenal forward Andrey Arshavin has moved to Kazakhstan, signing a one-year contract with Kairat Almaty. (Daily Mail)Tottenham have stepped up their interest in Anderlecht’s teenage prospect Youri Tielemans. Tielemans, 18, has been watched by Spurs and Liverpool while West Brom are the latest club to be linked with the Belgium under-21 midfielder. (The Sun)And here are the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…?Rene Meulensteen slams current Manchester United team as ‘nowhere near’ the levels of Champions League sides‘Sunderland players need a mental toughness for Newcastle atmosphere’ – Sam AllardyceArsenal and Tottenham send scouts to watch striker target Michy BatshuayiManchester United to battle Arsenal in scrap to sign Napoli striker Gonzalo HiguainArsenal and Tottenham sending scouts to watch highly-rated Chelsea teenager Domingos QuinaGenoa say Liverpool and Manchester United target Mattia Perin will not leave clubTottenham back in for Sporting Lisbon striker Islam SlimaniJuventus to sell Paul Pogba to fund moves for N’Golo Kante and Edinson CavaniWest Ham plotting club-record move for in-demand Lyon striker Alexandre LacazetteInter Milan striker Eder insists he does not regret Leicester City snubEx-Liverpool and Chelsea striker Fernando Torres set for Mexico move? Transfer rumours and paper review 1last_img read more

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Chelsea tipped to offer in excess of £30m for Morocco star Benatia

first_imgChelsea are set to table a bid of just over £30m for Roma defender Mehdi Benatia, La Gazzetta Dello Sport claim.Manchester United have also been linked with the 27-year-old Morocco international, with reports suggesting he is potentially for sale.And the Blues have been tipped to offer €38m for Benatia, which Roma are said to be inclined to accept.Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho wants Benatia, it is claimedMeanwhile, QPR are close to completing a deal to sign Jonathan de Guzman from Villarreal, Spanish newspaper Marca has reported.The Netherlands midfielder, 26, has been on loan at Swansea for the last two seasons and they are keen to sign him permanently.But Rangers boss Harry Redknapp was alerted to his potential availability when it became apparent Swansea were struggling to agree a deal.Rangers are willing to pay £7m and Marca say Villarreal are ready to complete the transfer. Related West London Sport story (9 August): QPR ready to agree £7m De Guzman dealQPR have indicated they will pay £7m for De GuzmanAC Milan plan to offer QPR £3m for Adel Taarabt, Sky Sport Italia have reported.Taarabt ended last season on loan at the Italian club and is desperate to join them on a permanent basis.And it is claimed that Kia Joorabchian, who has advised QPR on various transfer deals and acts as Taarabt’s representative, is due to meet Milan chief executive Adriano Galliani on Tuesday to discuss a potential deal.Rangers manager Harry Redknapp, who sold Taarabt to the R’s when he was Tottenham boss, has indicated that the player is determined to move on.Taarabt’s future is uncertain following his return to Rangers.Spurs would be entitled to a significant share of any transfer fee under the terms of the deal that took Taarabt to Loftus Road in the summer of 2010. Related West London Sport story (11 August): No cut-price Taarabt deal, QPR boss insists Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Video: Watch A’s outfielder Ramon Laureano miraculously steal MLB award

first_imgRamon Laureano’s prowess as a center fielder got a little more validation on Monday, thanks to Major League Baseball.Laureano’s unbelievable home run-robbing catch and subsequent double play on Sunday afternoon was named MLB’s Play of the Week.It’s not hard to see why.OMG THE GREATEST DOUBLE PLAY EVER pic.twitter.com/XZTtqL2kYN — A’s on NBCS (@NBCSAthletics) April 21, 2019Defensively, the spectacular is almost becoming commonplace for the 24-year-old Laureano, in just his …last_img

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Raiders Straight Talk: A quarter-century of memories at the Coliseum

first_imgOAKLAND — With a quarter of a century of Raiders home football coming to a conclusion Sunday, the number that comes after 252 is zero.I’ve covered 252 Raiders games at the Coliseum since 1995. There were 48 exhibition games of which I remember almost nothing, expunged immediately from my brain as being the pointless exercises they were. Five postseason games, of which the Raiders won four. And 198 regular-season games, of which the Raiders won 94 and lost 104, with No. 199 coming up Sunday …last_img

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8.7 Million Species Is Not a Scientific Fact

first_imgHuman beings love to classify things.  We pigeonhole items into bins of our own making, for whatever the reason, to give us a feeling of having things organized and understood.   Do our pigeonholes reflect categories that are “out there” in nature, or are they constructs of our own minds?  Science reporters are announcing in bold print that there are “8.7 million species on Earth,” but a look at the fine print shows the error bars to be so enormous, there is more error than data.  What does this imply about the scientific validity of human classification schemes? PhysOrg announced the 8.7 million number in its summary of a paper on PLoS Biology.1  National Geographic News followed up with a headline on one of the findings by Mora et al.: “86 Percent of Earth’s Species Still Unknown?”  Right off the bat, questions arise about how anyone can know the 8.7 million number with only 14 percent data. It would seem that many among the to-be-discovered organisms in the 86 percent bin might not be species at all, but members of smaller groupings like subspecies or varieties – or even of larger taxa [biological categories] like families or phyla.  In the 08/20/11 story, for instance, a whole new family, genus, and species was created for Protoanguilla palau, an eel that was classified as the only member of its new taxon.  Not all taxa are created equal.  Some phyla like Micrognathozoa and Ciliophora have only one member (SFSU.edu) while some lower taxa, like the order Coleoptera (beetles) within the class Insecta have over 2 million species. Other scientific classification schemes seem to carve nature at its joints more cleanly.  The periodic table in chemistry is a classic example.  Even there, though, the use of atomic number to distinguish groups of things can seem a bit arbitrary in some situations, because there are isotopes of some elements that are heavier than elements with a higher atomic number.  Planet classification continues to vex astronomers ever since Pluto got demoted from a “planet” to a “dwarf planet” (after some tried minor planet or plutoid).  The International Astronomical Union (IAU) is the panel that places a kind of scientific imprimatur on nomenclature.  Back in 2006, after much debate, they voted Pluto out of the “Planet” bin.  National Geographic News reported this week, though, that “New Finds Drive Debate” about whether Pluto should be promoted back to planet.  Those finds include other bodies large and small in the outer solar system (some larger than Pluto), new computer models that show objects moving around over time (moving, for instance from planetary satellite to sun-orbiter), exoplanets, and some planet-size bodies that don’t orbit stars at all. Reporter Victoria Jaggard’s lengthy foray into the wrestling matches over planetary classification showcased the human emotions involved.  “After the ruling, astronomers everywhere were besieged by complaints from everyone big and small,” planetary scientist Marc Kuchner (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) remembered.  “A planet is a very personal thing—we think of the Earth, the moon, and the other planets as part of our home, and maybe that’s why we got so upset about Pluto.”  Space.com gave space to planet killer Mike Brown and planet defender Alan Stern.  In the NG News article, Owen Gingerich recalled that emotions rang high partly because “It was a bureaucratic problem, as it had to do with naming rights for these kinds of things.”  Does the IAU get naming rights simply because of its power and prestige?  If a political dictator had the power, could he make his naming scheme the official one? In the species wars, too, it is clear that politics gets embroiled.  Commenting on the original paper by Mora et al. in PLoS Biology,2 Robert May (Oxford U) tried to argue that taxonomy is more than just stamp collecting.  He asked, “Why Worry About How Many Species and Their Loss?”  His answer was, “we increasingly recognise that such knowledge is important for full understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes which created, and which are struggling to maintain, the diverse biological riches we are heir to.”  The operative word is we, because May sees humans as beneficiaries of “ecosystem services” that classification helps us understand.  It is difficult to see why this should be so, however, since the ecosystem is what it is, regardless of how we carve it up name-wise.  Lord May noted that we can count the number of books in the Library of Congress (at a given point in time) to eight significant figures, but cannot estimate the number of species within an order of magnitude (e.g., one million vs ten million).  Part of the problem, he said, is that some species get classified into two or more different collections.  Another is that taxonomists carve up organisms into equal-size bins of plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates, even though “plant species are roughly 10 times, and invertebrates 100 times, more numerous than vertebrates.”  And the big mammals get noticed easier than tiny microbes living under Antarctic ice. Mora et al. addressed the problems of subjectivity in the Linnaen classification system, but pushed ahead anyway, justifying their analytical estimate of 8.7 million species, aware that 86% of  land organisms and up to 91% of marine organisms remain unknown to science.  It’s a hopeless task to close that gap, they lamented, because “describing Earth’s remaining species may take as long as 1,200 years and would require 303,000 taxonomists at an approximated cost of US$364 billion.”   And “With extinction rates now exceeding natural background rates by a factor of 100 to 1,000, our results also suggest that this slow advance in the description of species will lead to species becoming extinct before we know they even existed. ”  Yet taxonomists must press on, they argued, because “High rates of biodiversity loss provide an urgent incentive to increase our knowledge of Earth’s remaining species.” And there’s the political rub.  Laws to protect endangered species assume biologists know what species are.  Mora worried in the PhysOrg article that classification is “particularly important now because a host of human activities and influences are accelerating the rate of extinctions.”  But it’s much easier to discover a critter than classify it, National Geographic News explained: “Scientists must compare their specimen to museum samples, analyze its DNA, and complete reams of paperwork” to give it a place in the taxonomic tree.  It’s a long process.  A biologist could only classify a few dozen in a lifetime, “if they’re really lucky,” one remarked.  Visualizing a crisis, with species disappearing faster than we can find them, Mora said, “With the clock of extinction now ticking faster for many species, I believe speeding the inventory of Earth’s species merits high scientific and societal priority.” 1. Mora, Tittensor et al., “How Many Species Are There on Earth and in the Ocean?”, Public Library of Science Biology, 9(8): e1001127. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001127 (open access). 2. Robert M. May, “Why Worry about How Many Species and Their Loss?”, Public Library of Science Biology 9(8): e1001130. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001130 (open access). An old joke applies here. A homeless person was offered a job – a very simple job – to sort potatoes into a pile of big potatoes and a pile of small potatoes.  What could be an easier way to earn some whiskey dough?  Before getting halfway through, though, the guy quit.  Why?  “The decisions,” he mumbled. Let’s have some fun with taxonomy (a vexed issue in philosophy of science).  Would it be appropriate to lump all living things into one category?  Sure, if it is useful to you.  You could call it “Inhabitants of the Biosphere” or some catchy name, like geota.  After all, geota all share a genetic code, right?  Now instead of 8.7 million things, you have one nice, tidy category. How could that be useful?  Well, you’ve immediately distinguished geota from Martians and space aliens.  That could be useful in some scientific discussions.  But even then, you would have to worry about whether some geota migrated to Mars, as seems more plausible now, thanks to a report on PhysOrg that “Simulation shows how Earth may have seeded life on other planets.”  So when NASA brings back soil samples from Mars, there will be new debates about whether any putative life forms are really geota from Earth contamination – or even whether geota originated on Mars and migrated to Earth, making the geota category moot in the first place. The same problems exist with other classification schemes.  All bodies in the solar system could be classified as sun-orbiters, if useful (after all, even moons orbit the sun in a loopy spirograph kind of way).  There are no laws of classification handed down from on high.  We make them up.  It’s whatever your groove is, man.  You can classify the elements into Earth, Air, Fire, and Water if you want to—a scheme that the Greeks found useful for centuries.  In his classic cartoon Science Made Stupid, Tom Weller showed how the Greek scheme could deduce chemical compounds.  Add earth to air, for instance and you get smog; fire plus water yields Tequila.  Some cultures might find that knowledge useful. In the late second millennium A.D., some human cultures have found it useful to classify living things into a hierarchy of phylum-class-order-family-genus-species, physical stuff into elements-isotopes-compounds-subatomic_particles, and orbiting bodies into planets-satellites-asteroids-comets-dust (with some new entries, such as Kuiper Belt Objects, Trans-Neptunian Objects, Near-Earth Asteroids, Plutoids, Minor Planets, Dwarf Planets, comet-like asteroids, asteroid-like comets etc.).  You get into the small-potatoes dilemma when you try to classify the moons of Saturn, when bodies grade smoothly from Titan-size moons down to micron-size ring particles, or classify subatomic particles (how many muons, leptons, hadrons, quarks, and strings are there, anyway?) but for most uses, our schemes serve us well; they have led to many useful discoveries. Conversely, you could go to the other extreme and put each object into its own bin.  Chemists could have thousands of bins, with one for each chemical isotope.  You could call each planetary body by its proper name without lumping it into higher groups.  You could classify every individual organism of a species into its own category.  We do that already in some cases, like giving names to each chimpanzee in the primate cage at the zoo.  The zookeeper doesn’t want to refer to Pan troglodytes in such cases, but to Bonzo, Ponzi and Sally.  The situation dictates the choice of classification.  Any situation involving human subjective judgment is going to start debates.  Biological taxonomists have long endured the wars of the lumpers and splitters, those who want fewer categories, and those who want more.  And don’t discount the lust for fame – the desire to discover a new species and name it yourself, or even name it for yourself.  Our thought experiment about geota is just lumping taken to the extreme. Even our best scientific classification schemes are riddled with internal flaws.  Did you know there are multiple competing definitions of species?  Try any one definition, and it will raise vexing questions.  The common definition we learn in high school biology, the biological species concept, tries to define a species as a group in which members can produce fertile offspring.  Nice, except that you’ve just ruled out fossils and the vast majority of organisms that reproduce asexually.  Another recent scheme called PhyloCode tried to group living things by their evolutionary lineage.  Creationists would just love that one, but even evolutionists cannot agree on ancestral lines in their mythical Tree of Life (see article on Evolution News & Views). This excursion into philosophy of classification is trivia except when the classifiers come after your wallet.  Most of us can get by in life whether or not Pluto is dubbed a planet, but the Endangered Species Act has caused landowners their livelihood.  Remember the snail darter?  It is human beings, with their flawed schemes, who decide what constitutes an endangered species.  Reclassify snail darters as members of a larger taxon with a wider range, and presto! the landowner gets his private property rights back.  What changed?  The snail darter?  No; the society’s decision, based on political power.  All it takes for an ideologue with an agenda to stop a shopping center or factory that might create hundreds of jobs is to discover a weed or roundworm in the path of development and convince the EPA it is endangered.  Classification looms large as a political issue in such cases. This commentary focused on utility as the essence of classification.  Any classification scheme is appropriate to the degree it is useful.  Now, one must ask the follow-up question lurking in the shadows: useful to whom?(Visited 55 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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How do non-GMO hybrids perform?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest According to the USDA-Economic Research Service in 2015, 85% of the state’s corn acreage was planted to transgenic corn hybrids with 68% of total acreage planted to stacked trait hybrids (http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/biotechcrops/ ). However, many corn growers in Ohio are interested in growing non-transgenic (non-GMO) corns. Some want to grow non-GMO corn to reduce seed costs associated with traited corn and/or take advantage of the premiums offered for non-GMO corn. Growers who have not experienced serious problems with rootworm and corn borer and who have controlled weeds effectively with traditional herbicide programs question the need for transgenic hybrids. There are also corn growers interested in cutting costs by selecting hybrids with fewer transgenic traits for similar reasons.A major concern of growers is whether the yield potential of hybrids with fewer transgenic traits or no transgenic traits is less than that of stacked trait hybrids with multiple genes for above and below ground insect resistance. One explanation for this concern is that some seed companies are no longer introducing non-transgenic versions of certain hybrids or are releasing non-transgenic versions some years after the original hybrid has been introduced.  So, when a new high yielding hybrid is introduced it’s often only available with stacked traits. As a consequence, some growers believe that in order to optimize yields with the newest “genetics” you need to plant stacked trait corn hybrids with transgenic traits for above and below ground insect resistance.Table 1 shows four groupings of hybrids that were entered in the 2014 and 2015 Ohio Corn Performance Tests (OCPT) – 1) hybrids without transgenic traits (non-GMO), 2) hybrids with transgenic herbicide resistance, 3) hybrids with transgenic traits for above ground insect resistance, and 4) hybrids with transgenic traits for above and below ground insect resistance (the latter two groups are also characterized by transgenic herbicide resistance). Table 1 also includes the average yield, range in yield, number of hybrids, and number of test plot comparisons associated with each of these groups. Hybrids with transgenic traits comprised over 90% of the OCPT entries in 2014 and 2015 respectively. The grouping of hybrids with above and below ground insect resistance accounted for the largest number of hybrids tested (62% and 50% in 2014 and 2015, respectively) followed by the grouping of hybrids with transgenic traits for above ground insect resistance only (31% and 40% in 2014 and 2015, respectively). Non transgenic hybrids and hybrids with herbicide resistance accounted for less than 10% of OCPT entries each of these years.In Table 1, the average yields and range in yield of the four hybrid groupings show that non-transgenic hybrids are available that yield competitively with many transgenic corn hybrids in the absence of corn borer and rootworm pressure. Similarly yields of hybrids with transgenic traits for above ground insect resistance only were comparable to yields of hybrids with transgenic traits for above and below ground insect resistance. Force 3G soil insecticide is applied in a T-band to all OCPT plots to minimize rootworm injury.Table 1. Grain yields of hybrids grouped by transgenic traits for above and below ground insect resistance, herbicide resistance and no transgenic traits (Non-GMO), Ohio Corn Performance Test, 2014-2015.20142015TraitsYieldBu/ARangeBu/ANo. ofHybrids1YieldBu/ARangeBu/ANo. ofHybrids1Non-GMO223160-26811(144)204139-27918(213)Herbicide Resistant only194142-2514(36)213151-2622(30)Above Ground Insect Resistance229151-28965(996)226134-29487(1134)Above and Below Ground Insect Resistance226151-282129(2055)207136-304108(1608)Number in parentheses indicates the number of test plot comparisons.Growers interested in identifying high yielding hybrids for non-GMO grain production should consider using the Ohio Corn Performance Test website http://oardc.osu.edu/corntrials/ . Once a region or test location is selected, the sort feature under “Traits” can be used to find “NON-GMO” hybrids. A similar approach can be used to assess the yields of hybrids with varying numbers of transgenic traits.last_img read more

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Best Young Farmers/Ranchers-4

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dan MillerProgressive Farmer Senior EditorThe legend of American agriculture has been one of farmers turning west for new ground — always west. Mark Lange looked east.His land, near O’Neill, Nebraska, lay at the edge of the state’s Sandhills region. His crops were irrigated by an aquifer in decline. The state already had imposed water restrictions in other counties. Lange was convinced water regulation was coming his way. When that day came, there was no doubt his land value would take a hit. It was time to pick up his stakes and move. He did. Lange found better soils in Iowa.He was able to sell his 1,500 acres and buy a similar number in west-central Iowa. After the 2012 harvest, the Langes packed up their entire operation and moved to Bagley, Iowa. “For the future of our farm, we thought we should move to a state where we weren’t so reliant on irrigation,” says Joel Lange, Mark’s oldest son. “If we didn’t get the inches of water we needed, we weren’t going to grow crops.” Mark rented the land to Joel and younger brother, Stephen.Lange Farms Precision Ag was born.PATH OF RETURNThat Joel moved to Iowa or even chose to farm as an adult was not preordained. He had no clear career path back to it. He had enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve after high school. But, he soon longed to be his own boss — something a Marine is not.“I decided I missed the farm,” Joel says. His father was eager to see him come back. Mark began to turn over day-to-day operations in 2008.Joel’s goal was straightforward: to farm better. That didn’t mean buying a lot more land (the brothers have added 300 acres of their own).Perhaps it is for the lack of family ties in central Iowa that the Langes feel a bit landlocked. Rents are high around Bagley, and any land that does come up for sale won’t likely first come to the attention of the Langes.But, improving the productivity of the soil they did own might prove to be a better choice, Joel says. “We love taking an average piece of ground and turning it into a high-producing farm.”Iowa rates farm ground by a Corn Suitability Rating (CSR). Joel’s Greene County has an average CSR of 75. His actual farm averages 87. In wet years, county and farm yields are close. But, in dry years, his farm averages 30 to 75 bushels per acre above the county average.PRODUCTIVITY PUSHSo, then, in Joel’s mind, “expansion” does not mean he has to farm more acres. “We can expand by making our land more productive,” Joel says. “Better water infiltration, high organic levels and better biological activity will get us there.” Lange Farms is planning a more aggressive crop rotation plus cover crops to achieve those goals.Compared to Nebraska, Iowa has significant advantages — rainfall, heat and humidity. In 2013, 2017 and 2018, the Iowa farm had stretches of 45 to 60 days without rain. Yet, the corn still yielded 200 to 250 bushels.In Nebraska, irrigation made the Langes’ sandy ground productive. In Iowa, pattern tiling and irrigation — where it can be deployed productively — turns even marginal ground into significantly higher productive ground. On good ground, 80 CSR and above, Joel finds that pattern tiling increases his yields 15% to 20%.“With irrigation, we can double production in lower-quality fields,” Joel says. Perhaps more than that, really. One farm the Lange brothers purchased had a CSR of 66, well below the county average. They added irrigation to most of it. Dry weather in 2017 hammered the nonirrigated portions of that farm. Yields averaged 30 bushels. Irrigated corn yielded up to 300 bushels.LOCATION ADVANTAGEIn addition to close management of production practices, Lange Farms corn and soybeans goes only to value-added markets. “None of our grain goes to an elevator; it all goes to an end user,” Joel says. Within 40 miles of the farm, there are four ethanol plants and one tortilla plant. The farm grew non-GMO soybeans last season. My non-GMO beans are going to the SoyPlus facility, in Ralston, Iowa, to make high-bypass protein for dairy feed. “It’s giving us a nice $1.50 premium for our crop,” Joel says. “That helps a lot when times are tough.”Joel and his wife, Tanner, have four young children, two sets of twin — three boys and a daughter. If they wish to farm, Joel will preach healthy soils.He will tell them, “pay attention to the land. Learn more about the land than just about what seed to buy or what equipment to own. Pay attention to soil health. Improve the land that you have. Increase its production. Make it better for the next generation.” As he is now.Dan Miller can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @DMillerPF**Editor’s Note:The Progressive Farmer’s Contributing Editor Jim Patrico contributed to this article.This is the fourth of five profiles of our ninth class of DTN/The Progressive Farmer’s America’s Best Young Farmers and Ranchers. They represent the future of agriculture through their sense of tradition, use of new technology and business acumen.To see videos of all the 2019 winners, and for an application for next year, see https://spotlights.dtnpf.com/…(ES/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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PH archers miss gold target anew, settle for bronze medals

first_imgLATEST STORIES Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH cyclists Aquino, Salamat fall short View comments Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side MOST READ The Filipinos were shut out, 0-6 (54-57, 53-58, 49-52), by the Malaysians in the semifinals.The women’s side, composed of Nicole Marie Tagle, Mary Queen Ybañez and Kareel Meer Hongitan, also blanked Vietnam, 6-0, (51-44, 50-47, 55-47) for third place.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingTagle and company bowed to their Indonesian counterparts, 2-6, (50-52, 55-54, 54-56, 52-55) in the semis.The 15-year-old Tagle bagged the silver medal in the individual women’s recurve Sunday.The country’s archers still have a chance to win that elusive gold in the mixed doubles event on Tuesday. The Philippines’ archers stayed off target for a gold medal as both the men’s and women’s teams settled for bronze medals in the recurve events in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games Monday at National Sports Center Synthetic Turf Field in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.The men’s squad, featuring Florante Matan, Gabriel Moreno and Mark Javier, secured bronze after beating Vietnam, 6-0, (50-49, 55-54, 54-53).ADVERTISEMENT NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremonylast_img read more

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