Video: Zlatan Ibrahimovic is Back?!

first_imgSwedish striker and ‘football god’ (at least that’s what he thinks of himself) Zlatan Ibrahimovic may be poised to return to Manchester United as he continues to rehabilitate a knee injury he suffered towards the end of last season.Which knee? @azsportswear #azbyzlatan pic.twitter.com/xp3Aqmgdkv— Zlatan Ibrahimović (@Ibra_official) August 20, 2017There have been rumours throughout the transfer window that he may return to the club after his injuries, but the signing of Belgian striker Romelu Lukaku seemed to put all of that to rest. However, United defender Eric Bailly dropped a huge hint the big man may be back to Old Trafford after his recovery when he put up a video on his Instagram page with the caption: The 35 year-old free agent had a successful one season at Manchester United, scoring 28 goals in all competitions and finishing the season with the EFL Cup and the Europa League. “Zlatan” “Hope you’re almost ready to return, Zlatan. I’ll be right here! ???” 1. read more

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Junior camps coming back – Dr Blake

first_imgWith the World Junior Championships coming in July, athletics chief Warren Blake is promising that junior team training camps will be held this year. Blake, the president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), made the promise as he evaluated Jamaica’s performance at last year’s World Youth Championships. Jamaica won just one medal at the event. Blake said that was cause for concern. That single medal was golden, thanks to a fine performance by Christopher Taylor. While that was excellent, the modest team medal count was the worst by a Jamaican World Youth squad. “That is a bit of a concern for us,” he said candidly, “and this year we will be making sure that we have junior camps.” Such camps were standard fare up to 2004. However, the JAAA president said the unavailability of the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport prevented staging one last year. Now the college has a new track and has seen repairs to important facilities there. NO EXCUSE “We will really have no excuse not to have a camp at G.C. Foster this year,” Blake asserted. A three-day camp actually was held to prepare Jamaica’s team to last year’s Pan-American Junior Championships. In former years, however, camps held at G.C. Foster College were staged on weekends during the summer term and on weekdays once the school year was completed. At the previous World Youth Championships, in 2013, Jamaica was outstanding with six gold medals. Some members of that team, including World Youth 110 metres hurdles champion Jaheel Hyde, are eligible for the 2016 World Junior Championships. The host city for the meet is yet to be finalised, but action will begin on July 19.last_img read more

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Im no quitter on climate change issues McKenna says at G7 ministers

first_imgHALIFAX – Canada’s environment minister said she’s no “quitter” despite calls Wednesday from David Suzuki for her to resign and a G7 meeting that didn’t shift her American counterpart’s firm opposition to the Paris climate agreement.Catherine McKenna had started off the three-day Halifax gathering by telling a personal story of encountering young people in the Arctic who are worried local hunters are falling through the ice due to rising temperatures.“They’re worried about whether we’re going to do anything about it, because they don’t feel empowered to do anything about it,” she told the delegates, after reminding them of a summer that has seen massive forest fires and deadly hurricanes.The minister also spoke of translating the targets of the Paris climate agreement into action and said countries need to firm up rules around how the carbon emission targets will be enforceable.But by day’s end, she’d faced calls from Canada’s most prominent environmentalist to leave her job due to the prime minister’s support of the fossil fuel industry.The French environment minister recently took that route, saying he didn’t want to create the illusion his presence in the government was leading to progress on climate change.In a story published by La Presse, David Suzuki says if McKenna really believes what she’s saying, she too should quit “instead of being an apologist for the government.”He told the Montreal-based news site that Canada lacks credibility on climate change, with the Liberal government supporting the construction of a pipeline to the British Columbia coast to transport Alberta bitumen.Suzuki made the comments in the context of an interview about the resignation of French environment minister, Nicolas Hulot.“She must stop rationalizing what Canada is doing,” Suzuki told La Presse, adding that the government “talks out both sides of its mouth.”“We have a prime minister who signed (the Paris climate accord), who says, ‘We’re back,’ and we all praised him … then he approves pipelines! What is that?”McKenna defended herself in an evening news conference, arguing it’s easy to be divisive but difficult to continue battling for progress on climate change in a country dependent on resource industries.“I’m not a quitter. Resigning is easy. It’s really hard to do what we’re doing. This is a long-term transition to a cleaner future.”“I’m going to stay in this job as long as the prime minister keeps me here.”Meanwhile, the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Andrew Wheeler, said little in public during the meeting.After the gathering, he said in an interview with The Canadian Press that the administration of President Donald Trump continues to be opposed to the Paris agreement.“The Paris accord we didn’t think was fair to the United States, but we are taking a serious look at our carbon emissions,” he said.Regarding climate change itself, Wheeler said: “I believe climate change is real. I believe that man has an impact on it. It’s still a question to what extent and what we can do about it.”Wheeler said the United States is taking a “different approach” than its G7 counterparts, but still is looking to reduce carbon and can talk about other environmental issues with the gathered G7 ministers and invited nations.He also defended the Trump administration’s support of the coal industry in the United States, despite the high levels of greenhouse gas emissions from burning coal.“Worldwide coal usage is going to go up. China is increasing, India is increasing. Worldwide coal usage is going to go up, and what we want to make sure is we’re producing the cleaner technologies for export to other countries,” said Wheeler.When McKenna was asked about the challenge of working with the Americans she responded that discussions had been productive and “frank.”“The United States has taken a different position on the Paris agreement. That’s well known,” she said.She added that the delegates were still able to discuss how to reduce harmful emissions in the air and what “adaptation” is needed to prepare for the flooding, storms and rising sea levels already occurring due to climate change.In the afternoon session on adaptation to climate change, the environment minister for Jamaica spoke of how challenging climate change is for Caribbean nations that face the rising violence of extreme storms.Daryl Vaz told the G7 ministers that his nation has seen 14 hurricanes in a decade, along with 12 tropical storms.“We only have to look at hurricane activity to see … climate change is effectively normalizing the abnormal,” he said during his presentation.Jamaica’s efforts to develop economically may be derailed by climate change, with 70 per cent of his island’s population in coastal areas, said the minister.He told the delegates that billions in investment is needed for the preservation of natural areas that help stabilize the coast, including mangroves in the intertidal zones.—Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more

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Updated at 304 pm ETSenate Majority Leader Mitc

first_imgUpdated at 3:04 p.m. ETSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced he will introduce national legislation to raise the minimum age for people buying tobacco products from 18 to 21. Some anti-tobacco advocates worry that the plan could actually harm children by heading off other regulation efforts.The proposal from McConnell, who hails from a top tobacco-producing state, came Thursday at a conference with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, a Louisville-based organization. He has received more than $160,000 in contributions from Altria, a major cigarette manufacturer.McConnell said he was spurred by an “unprecedented spike” in the number of teenagers who were vaping, or smoking e-cigarettes.”We have an epidemic of nicotine consumption either through cigarettes or through vaping in high schools and even middle schools, not only in our state but around the … country,” he said.McConnell plans to introduce a bill next month. “This is going to be a top priority that I’ll be working on,” he said.Twelve states have already raised the minimum purchasing age to 21 with so-called Tobacco 21 laws, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.McConnell’s announcement was met with praise by giants in the tobacco industry, who say they support the age increase. “By raising the minimum age to 21, no high school student will be able to purchase tobacco products legally, adding another hurdle to help reduce social access,” Altria said in a press release.Yet some members of the anti-smoking community are skeptical about what’s really going on.Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, says the organization does not yet have a position on McConnell’s legislation because it has not seen the bill. But Myers said he is concerned that tobacco companies are attempting to include special-interest provisions that would hinder protections for kids.”Congress must not allow tobacco companies to use Tobacco 21 legislation as a Trojan horse for provisions that benefit the industry at the expense of kids and public health,” he tells NPR by email.He says tobacco companies have worked to include state provisions that limit the regulation of tobacco products, including flavored tobacco products.At the federal level, a provision introduced by Rep. Robert Aderholt, R-Ala., would allow certain items, such as the heated tobacco product IQOS, to be classified as vapor products, thereby evading stronger regulations than cigarettes.Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California San Francisco, tells NPR that tobacco companies are trying to “co-opt” a movement to protect kids. “They try to get in front of it by introducing bad legislation that preempts good legislation to make it look like they’re supporting a pro-health situation,” he says.Glantz says provisions backed by tobacco companies can criminalize youth for buying tobacco products instead of retailers that sell them the products, while other provisions have meaningless implementation language that makes the laws harder to enforce.”To bring McConnell in, that’s like the super, biggest gun you could bring in,” he says.Philip Morris International tells NPR it has applications pending before the Food and Drug Administration to commercialize its product IQOS in the U.S. “Increasing the legal age of purchase for tobacco and nicotine products can play an important role in further guarding against youth use of such products,” spokesperson Ryan Sparrow says. “However, that process must first begin with companies themselves.”A spokesperson for Juul, a popular e-cigarette, tells NPR in a written statement that the company supports “category-wide actions to reverse the trend in youth use, while preserving this unprecedented opportunity for adult smokers, and we will continue to work with federal, state and local policymakers in a transparent and collaborative fashion to achieve that goal.” Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris USA, has taken a major stake in Juul.In an email, an Altria spokesperson says the company backs “straight-forward tobacco 21 bills. … We remain fully committed to pursuing this legislative goal without condition.” McConnell’s state, Kentucky, has one of the highest cancer mortality rates in the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Along with West Virginia, Kentucky also has the highest rates of death linked to smoking.The senator says the bill will uphold the current system, which makes retailers responsible for verifying the age of anyone who buys tobacco. The measure will also have an exemption for members of the military, something that anti-tobacco groups have urged Congress not to offer. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Ministers have refused to say if they implemented

first_imgMinisters have refused to say if they implemented 10 measures – recommended by their own civil servants – that would have made it less likely that “vulnerable” benefit claimants would lose their lives.The 10 recommendations were taken from some of the 49 heavily-redacted, secret “peer reviews” that the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) finally published this week after losing a 21-month legal battle with Disability News Service (DNS).Although key parts of the peer reviews are missing DNS has found 10 key recommendations for national action to improve the way the department treats vulnerable benefit claimants, many of whom will have mental health conditions or learning difficulties. Many of the 49 reviews relate to the process of applying for the out-of-work disability benefit employment and support allowance (ESA)*, through the much-criticised work capability assessment (WCA) process.And many of the reviews – 40 of which refer to suicides – relate to the ongoing process to reassess long-term claimants of incapacity benefit (IB) through the WCA.The question of whether the recommendations were acted on could provide crucial evidence for calls – led by the Scottish-based grassroots group Black Triangle, and backed by many other disabled activists – for former work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith to face a criminal investigation for misconduct in public office following his refusal to address a coroner’s concerns about the safety of the WCA.They want to hold Duncan Smith and his former employment minister Chris Grayling to account for their failure to improve the safety of the WCA, even though they were warned that it risked causing further deaths.Last November, government-funded research concluded that the programme to reassess people claiming IB using the WCA could have caused 590 suicides in just three years.Any evidence that ministers ignored peer review recommendations for national action to improve the safety of vulnerable claimants will add weight to the calls for a criminal investigation.One of the 10 “vulnerability” recommendations in the peer reviews is for DWP to carry out a review of “the ESA process to aid identification of Vulnerable Customers”.Another calls for a review of “DWP’s ongoing Duty of Care in relation to the identification and support of claimants required to participate in the [incapacity benefit reassessment process], who as a result of a [REDACTED} may be vulnerable and have different support needs”.It also calls for this duty of care to be “brought to the attention of all colleagues including those from Atos who are involved in the [incapacity benefit reassessment process], and that their responsibilities for the identification and support of claimants with a [REDACTED] are written into role descriptors and included as specific process steps.”A third peer review calls for DWP to carry out “a re-launch to staff of the importance of identifying vulnerable claimants and taking their needs in to account throughout the whole process via updated bulletins, Comms discussions and any other practical means”.Another peer review recommends that “the guidance for handling vulnerable customers is reviewed and that staff are reminded of the correct process”.Each of the peer reviews that led to these recommendations had investigated the circumstances that led to the death of a benefit claimant.The peer reviews stretch from February 2012 to August 2014, and many of them appear to show that ministers, through their senior civil servants, were warned repeatedly that their policies and procedures were risking the lives of benefit claimants, and that action needed to be taken.But when approached this week about the recommendations, the DWP press office first tried to claim – wrongly – that the recommendations made in the 49 peer reviews related only to calls for action to improve procedures in the local area where the death occurred.When the press officer was challenged on this claim, she admitted that many of the recommendations included in the peer reviews – including the 10 highlighted by DNS – had been for national improvements.But she claimed that it was impossible to say whether the 10 recommendations were implemented, or ignored, by ministers.She said the department provided “extensive guidance to all staff to help them best support vulnerable claimants, and this has since been reviewed”.She added: “National recommendations were fed into the relevant ‘Customer Journey’.“These are considered by colleagues across the department along with other suggestions for change.“I’m sure you can appreciate, our ways of working have changed over the years as a result of our learnings from many sources – including peer reviews and independent reviews etc – and therefore it is not possible to link these changes to specific Peer Review recommendations.”*Freedom of information responses secured by journalist and campaigner Natalie Leal have revealed that, at the time of death, 22 of the 49 claimants were receiving ESA, as well as 18 of the 40 claimants who took their own lives, although DWP has not been able to say in many of the other cases which benefits the person was claiming.last_img read more

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