Flight Of The Conchords Announces Tour Opener At The Capitol Theatre

first_imgBack in February, New Zealand comedic-folk duo Flight of the Conchords announced their return to the United States at the Newport Folk Festival in July, then proceeded to announce a full summer tour, seeing the dynamic duo making their way across the states. Today, Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement announced a tour opening show at Port Chester, NY’s legendary The Capitol Theatre on Thursday, June 9th.Flight Of The Conchords Confirm Reunion With 28 Summer Tour DatesTickets for the performance at The Cap go on sale this Friday, April 29th at 12pm EST via Ticketfly. Just thinking about these guys potentially playing “Too Many Dicks On The Dancefloor” and “Hiphopopotamus vs. Rhymenoceros” (check it out below) has us amped. Flight of the Conchords 2016 Tour Dates:06/09 – Port Chester, NY @ The Capitol Theatre06/11 – Cleveland, OH @ State Theatre06/12 – Philadelphia, PA @ Mann Center for Performing Arts06/13 – Washington, DC @ Wolf Trap Filene Center06/14 – Columbus, OH @ Palace Theatre06/16 – Detroit, MI @ Fox Theatre06/17 – Minneapolis, MN @ Orpheum06/18 – Milwaukee, WI @ Riverside Theatre06/19 – Chicago, IL @ Pritzker Pavilion06/22 – Redmond, WA @ Marymoor Park06/23 – Vancouver, BC @ Orpheum06/24 – Portland, OR @ Keller Auditorium06/25 – Portland, OR @ Keller Auditorium06/27 – San Francisco, CA @ The Masonic06/28 – Mountain View, CA @ Shoreline Amphitheater07/01 – Santa Barbara, CA @ Santa Barbara Bowl07/02 – San Diego, CA @ Cal Coast Credit Union Open Air Theatre07/03 – Phoenix, AZ @ Comerica Theatre07/05 – Morrison, CO @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre07/07 – Kansas City, MO @ Starlight Theatre07/09 – Austin, TX @ Bass Hall07/10 – Austin, TX @ Bass Hall07/11 – New Orleans, LA @ Saenger Theatre07/12 – Atlanta, GA @ Chastain Park Amphitheatre07/14 – Nashville, TN @ Ascend Amphitheater07/16 – Boca Raton, FL @ Mizner Park Amphitheatre07/17 – St. Augustine, FL @ St. Augustine Amphitheatre07/18 – Cary, NC @ Koka Booth Amphitheatre07/20 – Queens, NY @ Forest Hills Stadium07/22 – Newport, RI @ Newport Folk Festival07/23 – Boston, MA @ Blue Hills Bank Pavilion07/24 – New York, NY @ Central Park Summerstage07/26 – Los Angeles, CA @ Greek Theatre07/27 – Los Angeles, CA @ Greek Theatre[via JamBase]last_img read more

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Toubab Krewe Announces Fall Tour Ahead Of The Release Of Upcoming New Album

first_imgToubab Krewe holds a special place in the hearts of many, with their eclectic and unique merging of world music, jazz, and jam gaining them fans far and wide. Today, the dynamic instrumental quintet announced they will be returning to the road this fall with the announcement of an extended fall tour. Since late 2014, Toubab Krewe—composed of Drew Heller (guitar), Justin Perkins (kora/kamelngoni), Luke Quaranta (percussion), Terrence Houston (drums), and Justin Kimmel (bass)—has limited themselves to primarily festival appearances during their extended hiatus that ran from 2015 through 2016, making this tour a particularly exciting one for fans of the band.This upcoming fall tour is in promotion of the group’s fourth album, which is due out early next year. Before its release, Toubab Krewe will perform sixteen dates across mid-August through mid-November, including two Utopia Fest pre-parties in Texas, a stop at New Orleans’ Blue Nile (following their rare club performance during this year’s Jazzfest), and performance at the Brooklyn Bowl, to name a few. You can check out Toubab Krewe’s full plans for this fall below, or check out their website here for more information!last_img read more

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Senate discusses Observer editorial

first_imgStudent senate discussed The Observer editorial “We deserve better” in senate Wednesday before holding a second, closed meeting to hear an appeal regarding a recent sanction placed on the Kruszewski-Dunbar ticket. “It’s not just this [editorial] but just how senate’s been talked about recently,” Sibonay Shewit, student body vice president, said. Student body chief-of-staff Prathm Juneja took issue with the portrayal of student government in the editorial.“When context is absent from something, it’s really easy to make assumptions,” Juneja said. “That [editorial] probably got thousands of views, so our goal is to see if we can reach that same audience.”The student government executive cabinet plans to write a response to the editorial and letter to the editor published in The Observer.“It’s not going to be an attack by any means,” Juneja said, referring to the Observer editorial as an attack against student government.“The purpose of the response is to focus on what context was missing in the pieces that were written about us,” Juneja said. “I agree that there are changes that can be made to Student Government, but there are also things that we do well.”Shewit did not disclose whether the response had been written yet or when it would be released, but did say that it would attempt the clarify the reasons why the three senate meetings were closed, as well as the separation between Judicial Council and Executive Cabinet. “We by no means mean to speak for you guys or any member of the Senate, we just think that there are facts that need to be added,” Shewit said. O’Neill senator and junior Sebastian Lopez delivered a speech, light-heartedly referencing his dorm’s history which led it to be deemed “the angry mob.”“Since its inception, O’Neill Family Hall has stood defiantly in the face of oppression and tyranny,” he said. “In 1996 when Grace and Flanner halls were going to be converted into administrative buildings, the men of Grace Hall stood up and in response they protested. And they lit bonfires all across the quads.”Lopez finished by motioning to “fight against tyranny” by closing the senate meeting.The proxy member for Sorin Hall, Mark Spretnjak, seconded the motion. Spretnjak, a sophomore, was standing in for Sorin Hall senator Nick Lucci. Lopez and Spretnjak were the only two members of senate to vote in favor of closing the meeting. Sophomore Zachary Spitzer, proxy for Dunne Hall senator and sophomore Patrick Quinn, said senators should discuss student government initiatives with their dorms.“One of the things that I feel really really helps out with Senate is when Senators individually speak to members of their dorm on these issues,” Spitzer said. “I know that Senate would like to make group statements on stuff that happens in the Senate meetings, but I really feel like when Senators really are transparent with people of their dorm on the individual level that really helps.”Associate news editor Natalie Weber and news writer Alexandra Muck contributed to this report.Tags: Observer Editorial, Senate, Student government, We deserve betterlast_img read more

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The Fans Have Spoken! The Top 10 Funny Girls You Want to See on Broadway

first_imgAmy Schumer View Comments Ellen DeGeneres Zooey Deschanel Elizabeth Banks A Tina Fey-Amy Poehler stage collab? Yes, please. A tuner to show off Zooey Deschanel’s pipes? Sign us up. A Bridesmaids musical starring Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph and Melissa McCarthy? Bring it. Funny girls do it better, and it’s about time we saw some of our faves from the small screen and the standup circuit take the Great White Way by storm. In honor of Funny Girl’s 52nd anniversary, we rounded up the female celebs that have left us in stitches. Here are the top 10 funny gals you want to see make Broadway debuts! Kristen Wiig (Photos: CR, Universal, Peter Kramer/NBC, Dewey Nicks/FOX & Robert Voets/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.) Amy Poehler Tina Fey Maya Rudolph Kate McKinnon Melissa McCarthylast_img read more

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Landscape Grasses

first_imgLandscapers can soon add a bit of Georgia’s historical Piedmont and native prairies to their designs thanks to the creation of three new little bluestem perennial grasses, released through a University of Georgia and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) partnership.Little bluestem grasses are native to North America and are a major component of the tallgrass prairie. They typically produce green to blue-green foliage. With names that conjure up thoughts of the ‘70s, the new little bluestem varieties are much more colorful than their traditional parents. ‘Cinnamon Girl’ has a red-burgundy glow, ‘Seasons in the Sun’ has a lavender glow and ‘Good Vibrations’ is a mix of colors: red-purple with green-yellow foliage.The idea to breed the colorful grasses came from USDA scientist Melanie Harrison. Harrison curates more than 500 different species of grasses and safely cold stores them in the USDA Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit facility on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. Most of these grasses will never be grown in home landscapes, but their genes may be used to breed specific characteristics into new grass varieties.Looking at little bluestems day after day, Harrison began to notice ornamental characteristics.“My job is to conserve close to 500 different species of grasses, so there’s a lot of variety,” she said. “I thought they were pretty, but I’m not a plant breeder, so I asked Carol (Robacker) what she thought.”Carol Robacker, a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences horticulturist, is Harrison’s colleague on the UGA Griffin campus. She was also Harrison’s major professor when Harrison was earning her doctoral degree in the college’s horticulture department.Their 2006 conversation about the little bluestems led to a research partnership that, 10 years later, resulted in the three new varieties of these grasses.Having bred numerous abelia and vitex varieties, Robacker knows that home gardeners and professional landscapers like to have a variety of plants to choose from, but they don’t always know how to use them.“Little bluestem is growing in popularity, but people don’t know where to plant it,” she said. “It does well in mass plantings mixed with other plants. And it’s very attractive when the wind blows.”Little bluestems are low maintenance, and the new varieties are bred specifically for Georgia. The grasses retain their color in hot, Georgia summers and go dormant in the winter. And, Robacker said, the color is “more intense in areas of north Georgia, like Blairsville.” After dieback, the grasses should be cut back in early spring.“They are at their peak in May, June and July, and then they provide some pretty fall color,” Robacker said.“Planted en masse, bluestems are very peaceful and they make great habitats for wildlife,” Harrison said. “Birds use them for nesting and protection. They also provide nutritious seeds for the birds.”Patents have been applied for, and the research team now seeks someone to license the new varieties.last_img read more

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GMP powers up three new solar projects

first_imgGreen Mountain Power has flipped the switch on three new solar projects, bringing its total solar installations to five and exceeding its goal of installing and helping its customers install 10,000 solar panels in 1,000 days.These newest projects include the solar orchard at Shelburne Farms, the roof of the GMP Montpelier Service Center, and a project that is currently the state’s largest, next to one of GMP’s fossil fuel generating plants in Berlin. All three were designed and installed by Alteris Renewables, Inc., of Montpelier.”We are proud to have topped our 10,000 solar panel goal,” President and CEO Mary Powell said. “We are now at 14,000 panels and aiming high. Our customers clearly want more solar and we are determined to help provide it.”The new solar installations by Green Mountain Power and its efforts to help its customers to do the same is a component of the company’s overall plan to reduce the state’s carbon footprint though the deployment of more renewable generation. The number of GMP customers who have installed solar has more than quadrupled since the beginning of 2009.GMP-owned projects include:A 150 kw system at Shelburne Farms (530 solar panels).A 138 kw system at the GMP Montpelier Service Center’s rooftop (616 panels).The 200 kw solar array installation at the company’s Berlin facility, currently the largest in the state (952 panels).A 58-kilowatt system at its Westminster Service Center (308 panels).A 4-kilowatt solar array for its Colchester headquarters, which powers its two plug-in hybrid vehicles (20 panels). The solar panels for the Berlin site are located on the same parcel of land as Green Mountain Power’s 50 megawatt conventional fossil fuel fired facility, which operates only during peak hours, just a few hundred hours per year.”We especially appreciate seeing the solar panels generating electricity in the same space as our fossil fuel plant, because adding renewable generating during peak periods, as solar does, decreases the likelihood that our costly, high emission fossil fuel plant will be called on to start generating emergency power,” said Powell.Shelburne Farms’ President Alec Webb views the completed project onsite as a way of supporting local energy systems and demonstrating natural resource stewardship. “We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with Green Mountain Power’s SolarGMP program on reducing our carbon footprint and enhancing the Farm’s educational resources.””Customer owned solar is a cost effective way of helping to meet electric energy needs when power use is high on hot sunny days,” said Ms. Powell. “The amount of electricity generated from solar is that much less power that has to be purchased from the New England regional energy market during peak times, which comes from more expensive and more carbon-emitting sources.”While it took two months to build the Berlin solar plant, a time-lapse video on Green Mountain Power’s website shows it in 40 seconds. Available at http://www.choose2bgreen.com/what-gmp-is-doing/solar-projects/berlin-sol…(link is external).More information about all the solar projects are available here: http://www.choose2bgreen.com/what-gmp-is-doing/solar-projects.html(link is external).About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power (www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external)) generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in the State of Vermont. It serves more than 175,000 people and businesses.Source: COLCHESTER, VT–(Marketwire – November 04, 2010) – Green Mountain Powerlast_img read more

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Interior Sec. Zinke Recommends Shrinking a “Handful” of National Monuments

first_imgYesterday, Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke turned over his long-awaited recommendations regarding 27 national monuments that the administration put in its cross hairs for possible alterations back in April.While Zinke did not recommend that any of the monuments—all of which were designated by either Barrack Obama, Bill Clinton or George W. Bush—be completely rescinded, he did tell the Associated Press that he’d like to see some boundary adjustments (read shrinkage) and would prefer to loosen restrictions on extraction in a “handful” of the 27 national monuments.His statement was vague, however, as he declined to pinpoint which monuments he has targeted for boundary adjustments and decreased protections.According to the Washington Post, which spoke to multiple individuals briefed on the recommendations, Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante, as well as Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, will all be slated for size reductions if Zinke’s recommendations go into effect.More proposed border adjustments and decreased land protections could be announced in the coming days when Zinke’s report is made public.Since assuming the helm of the Department of the Interior, Ryan Zinke, a former Senator and Navy SEAL from Montana, has styled himself an advocate and proponent of public lands in the vein of Teddy Roosevelt, but his recent recommendations have conservationists worried that his tenure could ultimately compromise Roosevelt’s public lands legacy.“The recommendations within Secretary Ryan Zinke‘s National Monument Review could negatively impact key fish & wildlife habitat, reduce outdoor opportunities, and undermine the Antiquities Act that has enabled the long-term protection of millions of acres,” reads a statement released yesterday by Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, a conservation organization out of Missoula Montana.The Antiquities Act, which was signed into law by Roosevelt himself in 1906, affords presidents the legal authority to designate national monuments, but many argue that it does not give the executive branch the power to alter or rescind previous designations—as Trump and Zinke are now clearly attempting to do.“Any actions that would dismantle these natural wonders would violate Americans’ deep and abiding love for parks and public lands and fly in the face of 2.8 million Americans who expressed opposition to these changes,” said President of the Wilderness Society, Jamie Williams in a e posted to the organization’s website. “We and millions of other Americans stand by the belief that those lands should be preserved and handed down to future generations.  We urge President Trump to ignore these illegal and dangerous recommendations and instead act to preserve these beloved places.”For his part, Donald Trump has expressed disdain for the size and amount of national monuments declared by his previous three predecessors, calling the designations a “massive federal land grab” during an executive order signing at the Department of Interior back in April.“It’s time to end these abuses and return control to the people, the people of Utah, the people of all of the states, the people of the United States,” Trump went on to say.Stay tuned as we continue to cover this important and ongoing public lands issue.last_img read more

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Robert Moses: The Last Master Builder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The one person who did more than any other human being to shape the future of Long Island was born in Connecticut on Dec. 18, 1888, and died at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip in 1981. Robert Moses never got a driver’s license but Long Islanders would get nowhere fast without his roads today—even though his Northern Parkway and the Southern State have long been obsolete. He regarded Nassau and Suffolk as the state’s playgrounds for New York City’s middle-class whites but without his vision for open space, there’d be far fewer parks here bigger than a village green. He never held elected office yet he wielded an unprecedented amount of political power.“If there wasn’t a Moses, New York State and Long Island would be a far poorer place,” says Dr. Lee Koppelman, Suffolk County’s former master planner and the director of Stony Brook University’s Center for Regional Policy Studies, where he still teaches. “There will never be another one in the State of New York—the politicians wouldn’t tolerate it.”Moses was full of contradictions: a builder, a bigot, a reformer, a bully, a social engineer, a misanthrope, and, without a doubt, a genius. Robert Caro, the former Newsday reporter who wrote the masterful 1974 Pulitzer-Prize-winning biography, The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York, called him “a dreamer,” “a very courageous idealist” and “a visionary” who could all too easily overlook “the human cost” of his projects. In his monumental book, Caro depicted Moses’ heartless destruction of a Bronx neighborhood, East Tremont, to make way for the Cross-Bronx Expressway, his callous disregard of Suffolk farmers shoved aside to accommodate the Northern State Parkway and the breathtaking transformation of “a barren, deserted, windswept sand spit,” which Moses had first seen in 1922, into the spectacular oceanfront park called Jones Beach, which draws millions and millions of people every summer.In 1967, Caro met Moses for the first time at his summer cottage in Oak Beach, where the second-floor living room had a large picture window at one end with a stunning panorama encompassing the Robert Moses Causeway and the 200-foot high red brick tower that is the centerpiece of Robert Moses State Park. Caro wrote later in an article for The New Yorker that it had taken him two years to arrange that interview because Moses had made it crystal clear that a biography was the last thing he ever wanted to see.“He was then at the very height of his power,” wrote Caro, “with absolute discretion over the awarding of contracts by city or state in every field of public works, and the word had gone out that no architect, engineer, or contractor who spoke to me would ever receive another such contract.”But Caro, like Moses, would not be deterred until he could tell the whole story. Moses held power from 1924 to 1968, until opposition that had begun building on Long Island finally coalesced into a force strong enough to derail him once and for all. Moses had outlasted six governors.LOOK ON HIS WORKS“He was not a planner, he was a builder,” says Koppelman. The distinction has made all the difference to Long Island’s development. When Moses built his parkways to connect the sweltering urban masses to his verdant parklands, he laid the groundwork for the suburbs.Builders followed his infrastructure, snapping up the property while it was still the boondocks. Nassau and Suffolk were the two fastest-growing counties in the 1950s, according to Koppelman.“The municipalities were the handmaidens of the developers,” he says. “There was no real planning. The politicians and the developers were calling the shots.”“All the ills of suburbia weren’t really Moses’ fault,” says Richard Murdocco, a former project coordinator with the Long Island Pine Barrens Society now at Teachers Federal Credit Union in Suffolk, whose master’s thesis at Stony Brook University dealt with Moses’ impact on the Island. “He wasn’t a subdivision builder.”H. Lee Dennison, the first Suffolk County executive, took Koppelman, his new master planner, to meet Moses for the first time in 1960 when “RM,” as insiders knew him, was then the Long Island State Park commissioner, among a dozen other job titles he held simultaneously.“I knew that he hated planners with a passion,” Koppelman says. Moses, who was in his shirt sleeves, asked them if they wanted lunch. “Stupidly, I said no!” he says. Then Moses’ private chef brought in a “simple plate, with lettuce and tomato and some roast beef.” After Moses finished eating, he told them there was going to be a $100 million bond issue to help counties and cities acquire open space for parks.“I said I hadn’t heard of this bond issue, and he said he hadn’t presented it to the legislature yet—that’s how he operated!” says Koppelman with a laugh. After the measure passed, Suffolk got “the overwhelming majority” of the money from Moses, he explained, “so Long Island was the major beneficiary of his programs.”In the 1960s, people were beginning to see the other side of the progress Moses promised.Take his goal of running the Ocean Parkway out to the Hamptons, which meant replacing seaside residencies on Fire Island with a four-lane fixed roadway atop an 18-foot sand dune. Homeowners suddenly realized that their houses would be wiped out by RM, not by a hurricane. “The opposition to Moses,” says Koppelman, “started on the South Shore with the people of Fire Island.”As Caro so brilliantly reported, Moses had previously only bowed to the robber barons of the Gold Coast—the estates “clustered around the little village of Old Westbury” and those wealthy holdings in western Suffolk like Otto Kahn’s private golf course—by bending the Northern Parkway away from Wheatley Hills and Dix Hills, and agreeing never to connect it to a state park, which explains why the route stops today just short of Caleb Smith State Park in Hauppauge while the Southern State runs directly into Heckscher State Park, the former Taylor Estate in East Islip.Moses’ plan to extend the Seaford-Oyster Bay Expressway north to Bayville for the Oyster Bay/Rye Bridge was his Waterloo.“He was going through all the freshwater wetlands in the Town of Oyster Bay,” Koppelman says. “Second of all, he was going through Gatsby country—that’s where the estates are and where the multi-millionaires are, and they were not too happy with the thought of an expressway going through their community.”On the other side of the Sound, Connecticut’s powerful Democratic Sen. Abraham Ribicoff, an ardent environmentalist, denied Moses any federal highway dollars for the project. Add in the resistance of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, and that’s why all that exists of the proposal today is a dilapidated row of orange traffic barrels on a stretch of pavement just north of Jericho Turnpike in Syosset.But much of Moses’ major roadwork was done here decades ago: the Southern State Parkway dates to 1927; the Northern State Parkway started in the 1930s; the Wantagh State Parkway was in 1929; the Meadowbrook, 1934; the Sagtikos State Parkway, 1952; the Sunken Meadow Parkway, 1957; the Long Island Expressway began in 1940 and reached Riverhead in 1972.When Moses designed his parkways, he never imagined that sections of them would ever be dubbed “Blood Alley,” as parts of the Southern State between Exits 17 and 22 are known today.“Both [the Southern and Northern State] were literally meant to be parkways,” says Robert Sinclair Jr., manager of media relations for AAA New York, based in Garden City, so motorists could “take leisurely drives through park-like environments at very leisurely speeds.”The sad truth today is that the parkways are “dangerous, and in large measure they’re obsolete, to be honest,” Sinclair says. “You can’t do anything with them! They need to be widened, straightened and flattened.”Moses’s parkways are also defined by ultra-low seemingly impenetrable bridges, designed, says Koppelman, to keep buses of poor city people out. Koppelman even once measured the overpasses on the Wantagh Parkway himself to verify that they were in fact deliberately built too low.“The only way you could get to Jones Beach was by automobile,” Koppelman says. “So Jones Beach was lily white.” Sunken Meadow, he continues, which was reachable by buses going north from Jericho Turnpike, was “supposed to be the park for blacks because the theory was that blacks were too poor to own cars.”The Long Island Expressway is wide, smooth and fast—when conditions are right. Moses, who adamantly opposed mass transit, nixed Koppelman’s proposal to run a railroad track down the median strip, which would have gone a long way to alleviating today’s traffic snarls. There’s another drawback to the LIE’s design. The expressway adds stress to our aquifers because its route along the terminal moraine interferes with the absorption of rainwater and adds to potential groundwater contamination.“Love him or hate him, he was necessary,” says Murdocco. “He’s a product of his time. You can’t fault a man for not being transit-oriented when the rest of the world wasn’t.”But there’s another point to be made.“Moses basically facilitated corridors of growth, which allowed Long Island to expand as it did,” says Murdocco, “but…look at Valley Stream State Park, Belmont Lake. You can see amidst all this suburban development that there are these patches of open space that would have been basically paved over if it weren’t for Moses’ foresight.”last_img read more

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The biggest mistakes we are STILL seeing with credit union websites

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Meredith Olmstead Meredith Olmstead is the CEO and Founder of FI GROW Solutions, which provides Digital Marketing & Sales services to Community Financial Institutions. With experience working with FIs in markets of … Web: www.figrow.com Details Believing that New Websites Don’t Need Regular UpdatingHonestly, as a digitally savvy society, we are long past the redesign it and forget it for two to four years phase of website design. Like any high performing bank or credit union branch, your website needs regular maintenance. Now you might be able to get away with not conducting daily maintenance, but at a minimum it needs to be cleaned up and updated weekly and monthly.In an ideal world your blog content should be updated 2-3x per week and your product and service content should also be optimized on an on-going basis. These revenue generating pages should also have educational content for users who aren’t quite ready to apply now. And smart content on high traffic pages that changes depending on any known characteristics of the user.Having Websites that aren’t SEO OptimizedIf people couldn’t find your brick-and-mortar branch locations you’d take action. You would make the signage more visible, make sure the address was clear from the street, or even add some additional elements to make the location stand out from its surroundings. Optimizing your website for search is no different.Search engine optimization (SEO) is the practice of making sure your website can be found online, and way too many credit unions are still missing the mark on this. Not only are website’s missing key on-page SEO elements like header tags, meta descriptions and alt tags, but they also lack a search strategy around what terms or phrases consumers are using to find financial products or services. And don’t count on your web design company to know all the in’s and out’s of this process… they are experts at programming, but you need help from someone who knows your industry and can help you craft content on your website that is user friendly AND works well with Google.Not Having Dynamic Content for Each UserMore and more we ARE seeing smaller financial institutions attempting to implement personalized experiences, but you can’t just insert someone’s name on a page and call it a day. The actual content and calls-to-action should shift based on user characteristics.If a user has visited a specific product or service page in the last week or two show them content pertaining to that topic when they return to your homepage. Or show them a rate special when they log into online banking. If they are a known customer you can even send them an email with these details. People want what they are looking for WHEN they are looking for it… so help them find more details. Be helpful, informative and specific. That will always win you trust and business.Websites are STILL Not ADA CompliantBelieve it or not this is still an issue. We are seeing many developers who remain unaware of how to design for WCAG 2.0 standards. Colors aren’t high contrast, PDFs are prevalent throughout the sites, and tables and accordions aren’t always readable. There’s just too much on this now to be creating websites that aren’t easier to navigate.To learn more visit our FGS blog or website today!last_img read more

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School Daze: How districts are planning for reopening this fall

first_img“It would be nice to return to normal, it’s just what’s the normal going to look like?” said Van Fossen. Another issue is bussing. Though, superintendents are hopeful for some form of in-person instruction. Those who spend their days in the classroom have also been left in a daze this summer. “It’s a lot of communicating to staff and parents, ‘Here’s what we’re doing. We don’t have a lot of answers yet, but we’re working on them'” said Van Fossen. “The degree of change that took place in March, I think the degree of change that can still take place in August makes it still really difficult to predict what will happen,” said Andrews. Earlier this month, the state education department released guidelines on how to reopen. But at this point, it’s still unclear if students will walk the halls. “Our optimism is that we can have students back in the fall, it’s just a matter of what does the model look like knowing that there is a lot of hesitancy and really fear from parents and the community,” said Maine-Endwell Superintendent of Schools Jason Van Fossen. “We are in a very messy conundrum,” said Windsor social studies teacher Sarah Bidwell. “This year, we don’t know what we’re planning. Our curriculum is the same but it’s very different when you’re in-person. Can we collaborate, can we have groupings in our rooms, is everyone going to be sitting on their own, what does that look like? It’s a complete change over from what we’re used to.” “We had some great success with remote learning but I don’t think there’s any substitution for in-person, classrooms, and those interactions and the engagement of students,” said Andrews. “Classroom spacing is one thing, transportation is another. And to be honest with you, that’s probably the biggest challenge right now,” said Van Fossen. (WBNG) — Schools around the Southern Tier are getting ready for the fall. “Whatever it looks like in the fall, it’s focused on kids, it’s focused on really trying to provide that safe learning environment so that we can not have a long-lasting negative impact on this generation. We have to get this right,” said Andrews. “We’ve been systematically replacing desks with tables, flexible seating and so on. So some of the social distancing really flies in the face of the pedagogy in schools that is collaborative in nature,” said Andrews. It would require social distancing in the classroom, one of the biggest challenges looming over administrators. There are three avenues for learning this fall. “That idea of transportation is really important for us in, how are we able to get students here?” said Andrews. School districts across New York have until Friday to submit their reopening plans to the state education department. Superintendents say they’ve had limited guidance as to what school will look like come September. Districts could also put a hybrid version of the two models into place. Final reopening decisions are expected to be announced next week. “To say that I’m upset? No. But to say that it’s an incredible challenge, it’s really about a six week turn around, and it’s a complicated organization to get all of the parts going in the right direction,” said Van Fossen. “Certainly it’s frustrating with that lack of clarity, and I think the biggest challenge is that parents, students, and staff really want to know what to expect,” said Windsor Superintendent of Schools Jason Andrews. “I think that we always need to make sure that we’re keeping ‘Maslow before Bloom’ which means we’re meeting our kids’ socioemotional needs before we’re working on content,” said Maine-Endwell social studies teacher Rachel Murat. Despite the uncertainty, schools are holding onto hope. While some are hoping to teach students in-person, teachers realize many lessons this year won’t be straight out of the textbook. With no decision yet, districts are planning for all three options. “There’s A-B schedules where half the population comes in one day, half comes in the other and then you stagger the student population throughout the building. And then there’s just the idea of giving students and parents options,” said Andrews. “We need to bring life back to the school district but we need to take into consideration that we’re not putting anybody’s lives in jeopardy as well,” said Murat. Districts say no matter how students continue their education in September, they are committed to making health and safety a priority. Preparing to be flexible with an unsettling situation. On the other hand, students could be back in the classroom. Governor Cuomo says schools may open if they’re in a region in phase four and if the daily infection rate is lower than five percent during a 14 day average. The first continues the remote setting students finished with this past year.last_img read more

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