Utah Volleyball Hosts Red/White Scrimmage Saturday

first_imgAugust 18, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah Volleyball Hosts Red/White Scrimmage Saturday FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Saturday, Utah Volleyball hosts the annual red/white scrimmage with admission free to the public.The first serve is at 2:00 p.m. and commemorates the Utes’ first foray into the Huntsman Center this season.Afterward, the team will also participate at the Utah Red Zone Fan Fest with all of the other Utes’ intercollegiate athletic squads at Rice-Eccles Stadium from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Brad James Tags: Huntsman Center/Rice-Eccles Stadium/Utah Red Zone Fan Fest/Utah Volleyball Written bylast_img

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Celebrate Responsibly this Super Bowl

first_imgThe Vanderburgh County Sheriff’s Office and the Evansville Police Department, in partnership with the Governor’s Council on Impaired & Dangerous Driving and the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI), would like to remind all Indiana motorists to celebrate this year’s Super Bowl responsibly by driving sober and safe.“This Super Bowl family and friends will come together and root for their favorite team. Super Bowl fans love to celebrate, but this comes with a responsibility to do so safely,” said Sheriff Dave Wedding. “We want to remind motorists this Super Bowl weekend that drinking and driving don’t mix. Please celebrate responsibility and help keep our roadways safe.”During the 2015 Super Bowl there were nearly 740 traffic collisions in Indiana. Of those, 45 were alcohol-related, with 60 percent involving a driver with a blood alcohol content of 0.08 or greater. In Vanderburgh County, seven (7) intoxicated motorists went to jail over the 2015 Super Bowl weekend.The Evansville-Vanderburgh County Traffic Safety Partnership, the Governor’s Council, and ICJI would like to remind motorists that accidents and deaths resulting from impaired driving can be prevented by taking the following precautions:Before the celebration begins, plan a safe way homeIf you do drink, use a taxi, public transportation, ridesharing service or designate a sober friend or family member, and give them your keysIf you see a drunk driver on the road, call 911If you know someone who is about to drive or ride impaired, take their keys and help make arrangements to get them home safely“Accidents involving impaired drivers is something we can all prevent,” said Council Chairman, Todd Meyer. “Together, we can work to keep each and every motorist safe during Super Bowl weekend.”For more information on Indiana’s efforts on impaired driving prevention and enforcement, please visit: http://www.in.gov/cji/2354.htm. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Bayonne Little League Minor League Games of April 9

first_imgBielan Law won against Tarantino, 5-0. Jared Edwards, Logan Servodio, Adrian Arbelo, Patrick Cena, and Ethan Villacres combined on a no-hit, no-run game combining for 18 strikeouts and walking only two batters. Edwards was the top batter with an inside the park homer with a mate on board and an RBI single. Chris Lopez singled in a run, and Arbelo also singled. The Farber brothers (Brayden and Logan) and Joe Giovanni combined to pitch a strong game for Tarantino striking out 16 batters and issuing four free tickets. Borker Transmission beat Perrucci, 10-0. Borker scored all of their runs on walks, despite getting no hits. Josh Chairavollati and Will Carrington combined on a two-hitter with Anthony Weimmer getting the only two hits of the game.last_img

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Downtown Jamestown Traffic Lights Lose Power Following Storm

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) JAMESTOWN – Several traffic lights are without power downtown on Thursday.Viewers also report that power is out in Randolph and Kennedy.WNYNewsNow will continue to provide updates as they become available.last_img

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Joe Bookchin named director of the Vermont Office of the Creative Economy

first_imgThe Agency of Commerce and Community Development today announced that Joe Bookchin has been named the new director of the Office of the Creative Economy. The OCE was created this year by Gov. Peter Shumlin and the Vermont Legislature in recognition of this growing sector of the Vermont economy. Creative enterprises’from web designers and software game programmers to architecture, e-commerce, graphic design, publishing and film and new media companies, among others’provide high-paying, skilled jobs that are critical to the state’s economic future. ‘Governor Shumlin and the Agency of Commerce and Community Development recognize that creative energy and entrepreneurial spirit are in abundant supply in Vermont,’ said Lawrence Miller, Vermont’s secretary of Commerce and Community Development. ‘This area has the potential to be a powerhouse for economic growth. We are delighted that Joe will be heading up this important new office.’ The office will work with local businesses and other partners to identify specific regional needs and prioritize initiatives for future economic growth. In addition, it will cultivate public-private partnerships among businesses and cultural organizations and assist business start-ups with networking opportunities. The office will also help creative companies by identifying sources of loan capital and broadband availability, and advise educational institutions as well as workforce training and development organizations. ‘A top priority of the office is to spur the growth of this important and growing sector of the Vermont economy,’ said Noelle MacKay, Commissioner of Economic, Housing and Community Development. ‘Joe will be a valuable asset in helping to grow this sector while also continuing the work of the Vermont Film Commission, now part of the OCE, by working with local and out-of-state production companies to enhance film and new media opportunities in the state.’ Bookchin is a graduate of the New York University Tisch School for the Arts film program, and spent 12 years as director of the Film Production Program at Burlington College, before becoming Director of the Vermont Film Commission four years ago. He lives in Burlington. 12.20.2011last_img read more

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Council of Economic Advisers: U.S. Coal Royalty Program a Drain on Taxpayers

first_imgCouncil of Economic Advisers: U.S. Coal Royalty Program a Drain on Taxpayers FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Patrick Rucker for Reuters:A U.S. program meant to encourage coal mining on federal land is open to industry abuse and costs taxpayers billions of dollars in lost revenue every year, a White House study to be released on Wednesday concluded.Roughly 40 percent of U.S. coal comes from federal land and taxpayers are being short changed on those sales due to lax oversight and permissive royalty rules, according to the report from the White House Council of Economic Advisors.“The program has been structured in a way that misaligns incentives going back decades,” according to the report.Officially, the U.S. Treasury is supposed to collect a 12.5 percent royalty on coal sold from surface mines on federal land, but the real share is closer to 5 percent due to loopholes and allowances, the report found.“Companies have employed several tactics to lower the selling price of coal without losing revenue,” it said.Among industry maneuvers the report highlighted: coal operators sell to sister companies at low prices or collect penalty payments from utilities that reject coal deliveries.The government is cut out of those payments, the report found, while reforms could yield an extra $3 billion a year.The federal coal program was once seen as an energy policy tool rather than a way to generate big revenues, former officials have said.But in an effort to curb climate change, U.S. President Barack Obama has used his time in office to promote renewable fuels and discourage the development of fossil fuels.Early this year, the Obama administration halted new coal-mine leasing while officials look to improve the program — another blow for a coal industry already shaken by competition from natural gas and weak demand from China.The Interior Department has said the coal lease freeze should persist for years, but that will be left to the new president elected on Nov. 8Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has vowed to renew coal industry jobs, while his presumptive Democratic rival Hillary Clinton has said she would support coal communities as the nation weans itself off fossil fuels.Whatever the environmental costs, Wednesday’s report shows that the federal coal program is a fiscal loser, said Brian Deese, an Obama adviser.“This is a hard look at the economics. And what we see is a program that, even before getting to the environmental considerations, is not serving the interest of taxpayers,” he said.White House economists say U.S. coal program costing taxpayersFull report from Council on Economic Adviserslast_img read more

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New Syosset Park Proposal Buries The Mall Once And For All, But Does It Go Far Enough?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York After decades lost in strife, the barren Cerro Wire property in Syosset may finally get a transformation the community can embrace. Now there’s a plan to build a “walkable village” with more than 600 residential units—no rentals—and 200,000-square feet of office space. Is this proposal sound planning, not only for the town, but for Long Island as a whole?To an outsider, the large field along the Long Island Expressway off Exit 43A would be questionable in its emptiness. After all, Long Island’s open space this close to Queens was mostly built up long ago. Yet, by Robbins Lane in Syosset, sits 39 idle acres, driving developers crazy.To residents, the land’s vacancy is a point of pride, the culmination of many years spent in opposition to the Michigan-based Taubman Company’s plan for an upscale regional shopping mall there. It’s a narrative community activists know by heart.Thanks to a land deal that served as the final blow to the project, 39 acres suddenly became 93, with the cooperation of the Town of Oyster Bay, which had long been one of Taubman’s fiercest foes. The newly announced Oyster Bay Development LLC, a group effort by Manhasset-based Castagna Realty, the Garden City-based Albanese Organization and the Indiana-based developer Simon Property Group, is thinking big. Their ambitious proposal was recently unveiled at two public meetings at the Crest Hollow Country Club. Named Syosset Park, here’s how the current proposal is shaping up:• 625 owned-residential units• Two business-style and boutique hotels with 325 total rooms• 65,000 square feet of casual and white tablecloth dining choices• 35,000 square feet of entertainment/theater offerings• 355,000 square feet of retail shops• 3,000 public parking spaces• 30-acre community park• 200,000 square feet of office spaceThe breakdown of the residential units includes flats, condos, townhouses, “traditional cottages,” as well as seven full-sized single-family homes. This mix will be dispersed among seven neighborhoods.Overall, the project seems to have garnered a generally positive response from residents at the recent public meetings. While civic leaders may have breathed a collective sigh of relief that the Taubman mall is finally dead and buried, their support of the new project should not be the end of the discussion. Important questions still must be asked.Syosset Park presents a rare opportunity to build a full-scale mixed-use project in Nassau County. Typically, these developments are proposed for Suffolk, where environmental concerns often accompany the developer’s pitch for a high-density zoning allowance due to the lack of wastewater infrastructure to accommodate the additional units. Here, the discussion is mostly limited to concerns about rainwater runoff and traffic impacts. Should the site’s legacy as a brownfield from the Cerro Wire days pose a larger issue, especially with a residential component in the mix? As per urban-planning standards, a redeemed brownfield is typically limited to commercial or industrial uses, so this question is worth posing.For the capped landfill on the site, the project envisions a large park. This re-purposing is a good solution because the ever-shifting soils as the trash decomposes underneath wouldn’t allow much else. A park is never a bad idea, and a roughly 30-acre addition of both passive and active recreational open space would be welcome in an area that has been essentially built out since the 1960s. The developer should take it a step further, however, and explore the installation of permeable surfaces for parking lots and sidewalks, and other “green” building methods. Making some of the commercial buildings LEED-certified and energy-efficient is a great opportunity in Nassau County, where the old building stock isn’t exactly on the cutting-edge.Simon is pitching a phased-growth approach, which is also sound. The developer should take that a step further, too. At the completion of each of the five- to six-year periods, Simon and the Town of Oyster Bay should conduct a market study to reassess not only the community’s needs, but those of the region as well. Having a dynamic project like this can reduce the impact of vacancies, both commercial and residential, on the region. And if the analysis proves that another phase is not viable, the developer should act accordingly.Stating that the residential units will be priced at the prevailing market rate should ease the approval process and ward off NIMBY feelings. But the project should do more to address the elephant in the room: affordability. For so much empty talk about easing our supposed brain drain and retaining the Island’s young millennials, it is almost refreshing that Syosset Park’s promoters didn’t echo the same unproven arguments. Yet, is it wise to construct market-rate housing in an increasingly aging community? Buzzwords aside, it would be smart to offer a large portion of the new units at prices that the next generation of Long Islanders can afford.Syosset Park takes an interesting approach to letting traffic demand drive the use of proposed commercial and office space. According to the developers, usage that generated rush-hour traffic was minimized, and off-peak hours’ use was maximized in order to reduce traffic flow. This strategy looks good on paper, but in reality the traffic impacts may vary widely. These concerns should be taken very seriously, especially considering that the LIE’s interchange with the Seaford Oyster Bay Expressway is already a bottleneck heading westbound. The site has good access to the LIE, but after the first few development phases are completed, Oyster Bay Development LLC should work with the MTA to construct a new LIRR station that will serve not only residents of Syosset Park, but the greater community as well.The proposal on its own is valid. But what about its interaction with the other large-scale residential projects being developed across the Nassau–Suffolk region? Examples include the newly approved Country Pointe at Plainview, with its 650 age-restricted units; Wolkoff’s Heartland Town Square, with 9,130 proposed residential units; and the Ronkonkoma Hub, which may have about 1,350 to 1,450 residential units. The commercial component in Syosset Park seems reasonable with the inclusion of hotels, but how will that affect the proposed redevelopment of Huntington Station, which will have its own hotel, and the rapid growth at the Village of Farmingdale? Any future development at Republic Airport should be factored in as well.The need for more regional coordination ensures that we aren’t just blindly throwing so-called growth at our economic woes. By taking an interconnected approach, development efforts in Farmingdale and Huntington Station can complement those in Syosset, ensuring the success of each project. Without an alignment of development properties, we’re setting ourselves up for an expensive series of failures.Compared to Taubman’s original mall idea, Syosset Park is a much better option. But the community must judge the project on its own merits, not on the site’s troubled history. Significant regional questions remain, and the project can be further improved. The developers seem to be interested in soliciting community input. Now it’s up to residents to communicate what they want for the area, not just what they oppose. It’s taken us this long to get here. Let’s make the old Cerro Wire site a sterling example of how Long Island can get something done right.Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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Muckles’ Ink making “quaran-tees” to help community come together

first_imgIn addition, Muckles’ Ink has a bigger concept they refer to as “Muckles Rally.” This gives businesses and local nonprofits the opportunity to pair up with Muckles’ Ink. Muckles will create the wanted material, and the business will then rally its market to purchase the products. In return, a certain percentage goes to that business. Coolbaugh says if you want to take part in this, the Muckles business design makes it a simple process. Some of the shirts feature designs from the famous cartoons of John Hart Studios – one of the companies Muckles Ink has teamed up with for this brand. “We thought well, let’s come up with some fun ideas for a new line of shirts, we’ll call it quaran-tees, brilliant. We’ve teamed up with a few businesses, a few local non-profits, and we’ve just kind of split the profits with them and do our part to help the community out,” said Coolbaugh. While the retail side is currently closed due to the coronavirus crisis, its online shop is business as usual. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Muckles’ Ink is a print apparel shop located in downtown Binghamton, and like many local businesses, Muckles is doing its part to keep its operations going. Founder Casey Coolbaugh and his team created a concept of shirts called “quaran-tees” to put a unique spin on the store’s apparel, as a way to not only stay relevant, but to help the community come together. “What’s nice about Muckles’ is its vertically integrated. So our print shop is in the basement. So we can come up with an idea and pretty much go from idea to product in I don’t know, a day or two. So if we have a fun idea we can whip it up real quick and if people like it we make some sales and print the order,” said Coolbaugh. “We’ve got some fun Gronk the dinosaur ones, some B.C. ones that are kind of like a newspaper throwback. There’s some cool designs. We’re just trying to stay relevant, you know trying to keep some money coming in. I mean everyone’s bottom line hurts now for sure, but we’re just trying to do our part, stay relevant and keep the dream alive.,” said Coolbaugh. “Like” Nicole Menner on Facebook and “Follow” her on Twitter.last_img read more

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More results point to 1-dose regimen for H1N1 vaccines

first_imgSep 11, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – US health officials offered more evidence today that a single dose of pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines may be enough to protect adults, saying preliminary findings in government-sponsored trials reinforce early results from company trials announced yesterday.In the government trials, large majorities of nonelderly adults had a “robust” immune response just 8 to 10 days after receiving H1N1 vaccines made by Sanofi Pasteur and CSL Ltd, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), at a news briefing this afternoon.Elderly people had somewhat lower response rates of 56% and 60%, but that is in line with older people’s response to seasonal flu vaccines, Fauci reported. The two vaccines were tested without adjuvants and at the same doses used in seasonal flu vaccines: 15 micrograms (mcg) of antigen.Since the H1N1 vaccine is new, most experts had expected it would take two doses to protect people. Evidence that one dose is effective means more people can be protected with a given amount of vaccine, and a single-dose regimen also means faster protection, since 2 doses have to be given at least 3 weeks apart.However, officials acknowledged today that, with the virus spreading rapidly in several states, the vaccine may come too late for some people. Doses are expected to become available in quantity starting in mid October, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said the virus is currently widespread in 11 states—five more than a week ago.Also, it remains likely that young children, who have little or no previous exposure to flu or flu vaccines, will need two doses of H1N1 vaccine. The first results of trials in children are expected in about 2 weeks, Fauci said.Yesterday, CSL and Novartis reported that large majorities of adults had a strong immune response to single doses of the companies’ vaccines after 21 days. The Novartis vaccine contained an adjuvant (MF59), while the CSL product did not. US officials hope to be able to use vaccines without adjuvants, because adjuvanted flu vaccines have not been used in the United States before and doing so would raise regulatory issues. (Novartis is testing its vaccine both with and without its adjuvant.)The US government has ordered H1N1 vaccines from CSL, Novartis, Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline, and Medimmune. Federal official have said the biggest share, about 45% of the supply, is expected from Novartis.At today’s press conference, Fauci said, “I’m very pleased today to be able to tell you that the initial results from the NIH [National Institutes of Health]-sponsored trials corroborate and reinforce the findings from the companies.” The trial showed that “a single 15-mcg dose of unadjuvanted vaccine is well tolerated and induced an immune response in healthy adults that is generally predictive of protection.”Researchers took blood samples 8 to 10 days after vaccination to test immune responses. They found that the Sanofi vaccine induced a “robust” immune response in 96% of adults aged 18 to 64 and in 56% of adults 65 and older, the NIAID said in a news release.Similarly, a single 15-mcg dose of the CSL vaccine generated a robust response in 80% of adults between 18 and 64 and in 60% of older adults, the agency said.The slight differences between the two vaccines may be due to technical differences in the preliminary measurement of the amounts of antigen in the doses used and the lmited number of samples studied so far, the statement added.On the safety side, “There have not been any significant adverse events whatsoever,” said Fauci. The most common side effects have been swelling and redness at the injection site, not unusual with flu and other shots.The lower immune response rate in older people was not surprising, Fauci said. “The results we’re seeing are essentially right on the money of what we see with seasonal influenza vaccine. Elderly individuals generally have less of a response,” he said. Older people are not a priority group for H1N1vaccination, since they appear to have some protection against the virus, apparently because of past virus and vaccine exposures.Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius called the results very encouraging. Based on the expectation of a two-dose regimen, “we thought people wouldn’t be fully immunized until after Thanksgiving,” but the trial results suggest that the first vaccine recipients will have immunity weeks earlier, she said.A leading flu vaccine expert, Dr. Gregory A. Poland of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said he was pleasantly surprised by the findings announced yesterday and today.”We’ve all made the assumption based on past history that with a novel antigen it would take two doses” to generate immunity, he told CIDRAP News. “So maybe H1N1 isn’t as novel as H5N1, where clearly two doses were necessary to reach protective levels of immunity in only half the population.”Referring to the CSL vaccine, he added, “The important news is that this was without adjuvant. I think most everybody thought we’re talking two doses, or one dose with adjuvant. This is somewhat preliminary, there were only 240 subjects . . . but this is very good preliminary news.””This will make a major difference in our ability to respond to the pandemic, because you can immunize so many people so much more quickly,” Poland added. “This means a 2-week time frame before you have immunity versus a 5-week time frame.”At the same time, he said it’s highly likely that young children will need two doses of the vaccine. The standard advice is that children younger than 9 need two doses of seasonal flu vaccine if they’ve never been vaccinated before, he noted.”I suspect what’ll happen [with the H1N1 trial results] is that as we work our way down the age range, there’ll be some age where you’ll need two doses,” Poland said. “The question is, ‘When is one enough?'”Federal officials have said they expect that the first 45 million to 55 million doses of vaccine will start flowing to vaccinators in mid October. At today’s briefing, Dr. Jesse Goodman, director of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said, “October 15 continues to look like a reasonable target for a substantial amount of vaccine. We’re certainly doing what we can to make some available sooner.”He also expressed satisfaction that 15 mcg seems to be an adequate dose, since federal officials advised the vaccine manufacturers a few weeks ago to proceed on that assumption.But in response to a question at today’s briefing, Fauci acknowledged that with the virus spreading rapidly, the vaccine may arrive too late for some people. Given that the novel virus just emerged in April, “the amount of time to make the vaccine was quite good, but there could be peaks [in cases] before people get vaccinated,” he said.Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said the timing of H1N1 outbreaks will vary in communities across the country, adding, “We do believe that many prevention opportunities will be possible with this vaccine.”Poland, commenting on the timing question, said, “We’re already seeing in colleges that as kids get back and are in large congregated groups, boom, they have flu in there. . . . So clearly it’ll be too late for them. But the sooner we get the vaccine the better,” and a one-dose regimen will mean people will be protected weeks earlier.See also: Sep 10 CIDRAP News story “Early results suggest 1 dose of H1N1 vaccine may be protective”Sep 11 NIAID news releaselast_img read more

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The continuation of the construction of the Vučedol Archaeological Park begins

first_imgThree years ago, an impressive Museum of Vučedol Culture was opened, which tells the story of the foundations of European civilization, and which has been visited by over 190.000 visitors from all over the world.This attractive location was first inhabited around 6000 BC. Kr. at the time of the first European farmers, and lived more or less intensively throughout prehistory. The time between 3350 and 2300 BC. Kr. it is the most intense period of its existence and in that period it is certainly the most important European center and the cradle of European civilization.Since the opening of the Vučedol Museum, it has been announced that the construction of the entire Vučedol Archaeological Park project will continue, according to the original project, but as financial resources and unresolved property and legal relations were not provided, conditions for the day’s development of the Archaeological Park were created only today. Less than a month ago, an Agreement on the implementation of the entire project of the Vučedol Archaeological Park was signed with the Ministry of Regional Development and European Union Funds and the Central Agency for Financing and Contracting of EU Programs and Projects, with a total value of HRK 117.229.998,51, of which HRK 99.704.988,73 grant through the European Fund for Reconstruction and Development.The goal of the project “Archaeological Park Vučedol” is to significantly contribute to the economic revitalization and development of the city of Vukovar, Vukovar-Srijem County by building and arranging the Archaeological Park through the improvement of cultural, tourist, communal infrastructure, tourism promotion, entrepreneurship and rural development, using new technologies and creative ideas in the education, presentation and promotion of unique culture and historical heritage in the park.In the Archaeological Park, there will be a planetarium, info desk, picnic area, Vučedol farm with animals from the time of Vučedol culture, educational trails, excursion zone, lookout, old craft workshops, pier for tourist boats and accommodation facilities of 24 bungalows.The entire project of the Archaeological Park should come to life at full capacity by 2022, which will greatly enrich the tourist and cultural offer of Vukovar and Croatia. By the way, from the first research in 1938 until today, only about 15 percent of the Vučedol site has been explored, so the treasures and secrets hidden in Vučedol will only be revealed in the future, but I hope at a much faster pace.last_img read more

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