Do you hear what I hear? Woodberry Poetry Room to preserve rare recordings

first_imgThe Woodberry Poetry Room’s rich collection contains rare and one-of-a-kind recordings of some of the 20th century’s most important poets. But because many of these rare recordings exist on fragile cassettes or on transcription discs made of lacquered metal or glass prone to separation and decay, these voices have essentially been silenced – until now.Thanks to an additional $1.1 million the Harvard College Library (HCL) has injected into collection development, ongoing efforts to preserve some of the Woodberry Poetry Room’s most fragile and important recordings are about to get a boost. The funds will also enhance a number of other projects and acquisitions across the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ disciplines.“Continuing scrutiny of our budget allowed us to repurpose some restricted funds in support of the collections,” said Dan Hazen, associate librarian of Harvard College for collection development. “We then invited all HCL units and selectors to submit projects and purchases for review. The proposals were made available for community comment, with funding recommendations determined through a competitive evaluation process. The Woodberry Poetry Room’s successful proposal will ensure that even more of its unique and fragile recordings are widely available to scholars and enthusiasts around the world.”last_img read more

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Alums return to assist and reminisce at convocation

first_img Related Gabriela Ruiz-Colón ’16 has two Harvard class photos in her apartment that she looks at often. One is from her First-year Convocation in the fall of 2012, the second from her Commencement in spring of 2016. Together, the photos bookend her Harvard experience.“I remember feeling a little lost in the 2012 picture, everything was so new,” says Ruiz-Colón. But by 2016, many classmates in the earlier photo had become her friends. “Harvard would change my life, but I didn’t know that when I was first starting out,” she said.Harvard College First-Year Convocation didn’t exist when Peter Mazareas ’73 arrived, but he remembers feeling the way Ruiz-Colón did.“It is an anxious time, particularly move-in day and meeting your classmates and roommates, wondering if you belong and how you fit into the class,” he says. “Nonetheless, during those first few days, I made lifelong friends.”Ruiz-Colón and Mazareas were among a group of alumni volunteers who returned to campus on Monday to marshal First-Year Convocation, the first official gathering for the College Class of 2022. For the past 10 years, alumni marshals have helped welcome and celebrate the incoming College class, greeting first-year students as they gather at their dorms and leading them into Tercentenary Theatre for the convocation exercises.,With inspirational speeches from alumni leadership, current students, and University officials, including the Harvard president, along with musical performances by student groups, convocation can help first-years develop a sense of belonging and class unity, as well as of being a part of something even greater.“Alumni marshals show students there is an even larger Harvard community at their fingertips,” says Mazareas, who has volunteered for all but two of Harvard’s 10 convocation ceremonies since 2009. “By being here to welcome students, marshals also help set a tone that it’s important to remain involved with their Harvard community when they become alumni.”Ruiz-Colón brings a slightly different perspective, as a young alumna who experienced convocation as a student and has now returned to marshal for the first time. She arrived eager to meet the newcomers and share her experience. President Bacow and others welcome members of Class of ’22 at convocation “Most new Harvard students don’t know someone close to them who has also gone to Harvard,” she says. “As a marshal, I want to give new students the opportunity to connect with another part of the Harvard community, and a really valuable one. Knowing that others have come before you can be really helpful.”Mazareas relishes the opportunity to return to campus. He even makes it a point to find the new occupants of his old dorm room, Holworthy 18. A few years ago, he began a practice that fast caught on: He and other marshals now take pictures of new students at each dorm entryway with their banners, capturing one of their first moments as neighbors.“I talk to every possible student I can. It’s inspiring to see the diversity of the class,” he says.Just being on campus brings back “a flood of positive memories” for Ruiz-Colón. The photos in her apartment remind her how she felt as a student.One specific memory from her own convocation inspires her to participate as an alumna.“I remember seeing a group of alumni come together and give each other big hugs,” she says. “Coming back as a marshal really brought me back to my first few moments on campus. I was so excited to be a part of this experience.” A warmth to beat the heatlast_img read more

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Amabile receives lifetime achievement award

first_imgTeresa Amabile, a Baker Foundation Professor at Harvard Business School and the Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration Emerita, has been selected by the Organizational Behavior (OB) Division of the Academy of Management as the 2018 winner of its Lifetime Achievement Award. Established in 2005, the award recognizes senior scholars who have made exceptional contributions to the organizational behavior discipline throughout their careers.To be eligible for the award, an individual must have completed his or her Ph.D. at least 20 years ago and be an outstanding scholar who has published in the most important journals and conducted research that has had a significant impact on the field of organizational behavior. Recipients must have contributed not only through their scholarship but through their service to the field.According to the OB Division’s award committee, “To a great degree, Teresa Amabile can be considered to have ‘created’ the field of creativity within organizations as we know it today, providing both the fundamental theoretical foundations and the rigorous approach to measurement that have guided creativity research for over 30 years.“Her work has shown how creativity is a central element of human experience and also an important driver of effectiveness in organizational contexts. Her record displays a remarkable range of methods and settings, from deductive laboratory studies to inductive work conducted in organizations.“Although Professor Amabile’s contributions are remarkable,” the committee continued, “it is clear that she has also facilitated and inspired the work of many other scholars, providing an intellectual framework that has allowed for progress in many other areas by emphasizing creativity as a common concern.”Members of the award committee also lauded Amabile’s dedication to doctoral students and young scholars, noting that “her record is overflowing with accounts of her selfless approach and the passion, confidence, and inspiration she instills in young scholars. She exemplifies the type of scholar this award is meant to recognize.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Mobile home park residents: ‘Where is our recovery?’

first_imgMobile home park residents will talk about the devastating impact of Irene on mobile home parks and speak out about what they describe as the lack of assistance for the specific needs of mobile home park residents after the storm. What: Press conference with mobile home park residents from across Vermont to set the record straight about the recovery efforts that are leaving them out and announce a petition for additional assistance for some of Vermont’s most vulnerable residents.  When: Saturday September 24th, 2011 at 11 am Where: Weston’s Mobile Home Park off Rt 12 in Berlin Who:  Weston’s Mobile Home Park residents have invited peers from across the state to join them along with their state representatives, Governer Peter Shumlin, and Vermont’s Federal Congressional Delegation.  Background: Mobile home park residents are some of the people most affected by tropical storm Irene but according to advocates, many are still not receiving the assistance they need to recover.Sandra Gaffney, a displaced resident of Weston’s Mobile Home Park in Berlin explains:  ‘We lived in these parks because they are affordable and we don’t have a lot of money, but now they are destroyed and we are ultimately responsible for either the disposal of the home or extensive repairs, costly guidelines that need to be met before even being able to return to the park, which we simply cannot afford on a fixed income. We are still in limo- where is our recovery?’Another resident, Donna French is concerned that ‘we’re talking about getting the state ready for tourist season, but we still have lots of Vermonters with no homes and mounting expenses. We need affordable, long-term housing for those that do not have the financial ability to return to their former living situation and help with the very high cost of removing the destroyed homes.’September, 21, 2011last_img read more

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The Super Plunge

first_imgPolar Plunges are too chill for these cold-hearted Do-gooders who wade into the frigid Chesapeake 24 times in 24 hours.There are polar bear plunges, and then there is the Super Plunge. For the last 14 years, dozens of participants have shown up to plunge into the frigid waters of the Chesapeake Bay 24 times in 24 hours to raise money for Special Olympics Maryland.“I wasn’t too sure about it at first because I was like, 24 times?” said Adam Hays, a Special Olympics Maryland athlete.Throughout the year, Hays competes in cycling, soccer, alpine skiing, basketball, and swimming. He started going to the Maryland State Police Super Plunge as a member of the athlete media team, cheering on the participants and raising awareness for the cause.After two years of watching from the sidelines, he decided to sign up himself. Hays has now completed the Super Plunge every year since 2005.“As an athlete, this is pretty cool, because I’m part of a team that is helping raise money for my fellow athletes from all over Maryland, knowing that even though I freeze, we all freeze as one,” he said.Hays said he returns every year for the camaraderie among the small,  tight-knit group of Super Plungers, the challenge of the event, and “the power of inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities.”Every hour for 24 hours, the Super Plungers race down the beaches of Sandy Point State Park into the Chesapeake Bay. Nonstop food and entertainment helps everyone stay awake as darkness falls and ice begins to form in the water.“My fellow athletes and I, there are like six or seven of us, and we’re leading the charge out into the water. Then everybody’s running in right after us,” Hays said. “That first one is pretty darn cold. As you keep doing it for those 24 hours, you get used to it… I usually go up to my shoulders. There are some other really dedicated ones that go all the way under.”The Super Plunge is one of five plunges Special Olympics Maryland puts on over the course of a week every January. For the other events, organizers ask participants to raise at least $75 to enter. To take part in the Super Plunge, participants commit to raising $10,000. There are typically 25 to 35 Super Plungers in comparison to the thousands of people who show up for the other events.Donny Boyd has been plunging for 13 years, raising more than $250,000 for the Maryland athletes. One of his best friends, whose son is autistic, first introduced him to the event.“I had absolutely no idea what was going on, but it sounded exciting,” Boyd said. “I’ve been a firefighter for 30 years, so not a whole lot intimidates me. But this was certainly a challenge.”He did the regular plunge for two years before tackling the Super Plunge.“Once you do the Super Plunge, you can’t go back,” Boyd said. “There’s so much excitement in that tent for 24 hours, you can’t describe it.”Boyd has carried that excitement with him the last ten years as team captain for the Super Plunge, rallying others as they work towards their fundraising goals. He also sits on the board for Special Olympics Maryland.This year, two of Boyd’s daughters will be joining him for the marathon event, carrying on the tradition of plunging for a cause.“They have gotten to know a lot of athletes by name, it’s personal now,” he said. “How many people have the opportunity to do something at a higher level like this and be so involved and make a difference?”Over the years, the Polar Bear Plunge has become a defining fundraiser for Special Olympics across the United States. Jim Schmutz, the CEO of Special Olympics Maryland, said they hope to raise $2.5 million this year, translating to around 35 percent of their annual budget.But the event is about more than the money raised.“It’s an opportunity for us to help people better understand the breadth and depth of our program,” Schmutz said. “We have 7,782 athletes and they’re participating year-round in 27 different sports. We’re not just a one time event.”Plunges are far from a new phenomenon. The Coney Island Polar Bear Club, founded in 1903, claims to be the oldest winter bathing club in the United States. Members take a dip in the cold New York waters every Sunday afternoon from November to April.In other places like Canada, Russia, and Scandinavia, plunges are historically held to celebrate New Year’s Day. People alternate between the freezing temperatures of the water and hot saunas as a way to boost their health. Although researchers have not found a link between this practice and improved physical conditions, there are some who believe the shock from the cold temperatures and the rush of adrenaline is a great way to start off a new year.At Scott Base research center in Antarctica, an annual polar plunge is a tradition dating back decades, It’s so extreme that participants wear a harness as they jump into a hole cut in the ice.For anyone planning to do a plunge for the first time, Boyd recommends wearing as few clothes as possible.“As soon as you get out, you can dry off, put your dry sweats on, and start your warming process,” he said. “A lot of people will jump in with the full sweat clothes on and it’s just miserable because you can’t get them off. It intensifies the cold.”And don’t forget your shoes.“Your feet are more sensitive than you know,” Boyd said. “If you go into the water without something covering your feet, it’s going to be like pins and needles.”Other Plunges Near YouRegistration is now open for the fifth annual Shiver in the River taking place on February 23, 2019. Participants can join a community clean up, run or walk a 5K, jump into the James River—or do all 3. Shiver in the River is a fundraising event for Keep Virginia Beautiful. Funds raised help increase programs that support litter prevention, community outreach, education, recycling and beautification for Richmond and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Participants that register before the end of the year save on 5K registration and have a chance to win a VIP package.Here are other polar plunges across the region: Maryland State Police Polar PlungeJanuary 18, 2019 (Super Plunge)Sandy Point State Park, MD.January 24-26, 2019Sandy Point State Park, MD.Virginia Beach PlungeFebruary 1-2, 2019Virginia Beach, Va.Hilton Oceanfront HotelWinter Games PlungeFebruary 2, 2019Hollidaysburg, Pa.Canoe Creek State ParkPolar PlungeFebruary 23, 2019Acworth, Ga. Acworth Beach at Cauble ParkDolphin DipJanuary 1, 2019Surf City, N.C. Roland Ave. Beach AccessMorgantown Polar PlungeFebruary 23, 2019Morgantown, W. Va.Cheat Lakelast_img read more

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British Land set for Broadgate rent battle

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US to resume federal executions after 17 years

first_imgBut at the last minute, the US Supreme Court refused to lift a stay on federal executions, saying that — “in light of what is at stake” — the block on executions should be reviewed by an appeals court.In April, an appeals court in Washington approved the use of pentobarbital for lethal injections, and Barr ordered that new execution dates be set for four of the five convicts.”We owe it to the victims of these horrific crimes,” Barr said in a statement.Following his order, the Bureau of Prisons scheduled the executions to take place between July 13 and August 28. Topics : Among the four is Daniel Lewis Lee, an avowed white supremacist, who was sentenced to death for the 1996 murder of a family of three, including an eight-year-old girl.The mother of one of his victims, Earlene Peterson, opposes Lee’s execution due to her religious convictions and appealed to US President Donald Trump to grant Lee clemency.”I can’t see how executing Daniel Lee will honor my daughter in any way,” Peterson said in a video posted online. “In fact, kind of like it dirties her name because she wouldn’t want it and I don’t want it.”Trump, who is a fervent advocate of the death penalty and has even said it should be applied against drug dealers, did not grant her appeal.According to opinion polls, support for the death penalty has declined in recent years and is down to around 54 percent from 80 percent in the early 1990s.Only a handful of states, mainly in the US south, still carry out executions. Twenty-two people were executed in 2019.Most crimes in the United States are heard in state courts, but some are handled by federal prosecutors, such as hate crimes, some particularly heinous crimes or those that take place on military installations or Native American reservations.center_img The United States will resume federal executions on July 13, after a 17-year stay, the Justice Department said Monday.There have been just three federal execution since the death penalty was reinstated by the US government in 1988.Attorney General  Bill Barr announced a year ago he intended to resume the use of the death penalty for federal crimes. Five convicted murderers were scheduled to undergo lethal injections in December 2019 and January of this year at the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana.last_img read more

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Trump to join NATO leaders in impeachment hearing

first_imgLONDON – President Donald Trump willhuddle with NATO leaders as House Democrats resume their impeachment inquiryprobing whether he abused his presidential authority by urging a foreign leaderto open an investigation of his political rival. Trump is set to meet Wednesday withGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte andDanish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen on the sidelines of the NATO leaders’meeting. President Donald Trump meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House, Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019, in London. APcenter_img More significantly, Trump will face oneof the most critical split-screen moments of his presidency near the end of theNATO conference, when he addresses the news media soon after Rep. JerroldNadler, D-N.Y., gavels to order the House Judiciary Committee’s first hearingin the impeachment inquiry. (AP)last_img read more

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Cardinals Fall To St. Mary’s

first_imgThe St. Louis 6th grade boys basketball team played a great game againsta really good visiting St. Mary’s team from Vernon, but fell short 29-25.The Cardinals had 5 players involved in the scoring attack with Kyle Salatin leading the wayfollowed by Cody Mohr, Hunter Laudick, Luke Wilson and Abe Streator.Tenacious defense by Spencer Mack and Cayden Pohlman helped keep it close.It was an exciting game with several lead changes that went to the last fewseconds of the game before St Mary’s closed it out and won 29-25.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Jim Mohrlast_img

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Two Switzerland County bridges set for replacement

first_imgSwitzerland County, In. — Officials from the Indiana Department of Transportation officials say two bridges Craig Township of Switzerland County will be removed and replaced by Indianapolis-based Milestone Contractors. The work is valued at $3,695,455.Workers will build a new bridge over Tucker Run and over Green Valley Creek. Both bridges are on State Road 56.Tucker Run Bridge A 3-span concrete bulb-T bridge measuring 200 feet in length with nearly 33 feet of clear roadway side-to-side will be built one-half-at-a-time at Tucker Run.  State Road 56 traffic will be controlled by temporary signals at either end of the construction site.  Clearing should take place this month, but crew mobilization will not occur until mid-October when signals are activated.  The new bridge is tentatively scheduled to open to traffic in November, 2019.Green Valley Creek Bridge Approximately 1000 feet of new pavement will be put in place to realign State Road 56 for bridge construction just north of the current Green Valley Creek structure.  By realigning the roadway, free-flow traffic can be maintained until it’s time to tie the new pavement into the existing State Road 56 route. At that time, a 14-day closure will be required to complete the connection.Clearing for construction at Green Valley Creek is tentatively scheduled for October 1.  Utility relocations will occur until mid- to late-December.  On January 7, 2019, actual bridge building operations begin.  The closure on State Road 56 is scheduled to begin May 1, 2019—with scenic highway and its new bridge reopening May 15.This new State Road 56 bridge is a single span concrete I-beam structure measuring 68 feet in length and 30 feet side-to-side.The traffic count on that section of road is 2,257 vehicles per day.last_img read more

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