NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Owner Standings

first_img4Jack Roush992,075-36-185128 PosOwnerCar #PointsLdrNxtPPosG/LAttempts 26Bob Germain13577-1,534-4326028 13Linda Hendrick52,040-71-210-328 17Michael Waltrip56752-1,359-2718128 36Ron Devine83379-1,732-336028 2Joe Gibbs182,097-14-142028 22Chip Ganassi42693-1,418-121-128 30Tad Geschickter47509-1,602-529-128 44Bob Leavine95104-2,007-343-117 8Rick Hendrick242,069-42-27-128 43Michael Hillman140107-2,004-144418 27Bob Jenkins34523-1,588-5428128 16Margaret Haas14779-1,332-714-228 21Richard Childress31694-1,417-623228 25J D Gibbs11620-1,491-6425028 45Randy Humphrey1944-2,067-6045023 After Race 28 of the 2013 season at New Hampshire Motor Speedway 6Richard Childress292,072-39-14-228 42Mike Curb98121-1,990-6542025 5Jack Roush162,073-38-211628 39Jerry Freeze35277-1,834-8539028 35Allan Heinke36382-1,729-635028 24Michael Waltrip55684-1,427-924028 47John Cohen4410-2,101-74709 31Brad Jenkins38483-1,628-2631028 7Barney Visser782,071-40-16-128center_img 40Andrea Nemechek87216-1,895-6140028 1Joe Gibbs202,1110—1028 11Rick Hendrick882,049-62-1413228 29Gene Haas10514-1,597-930128 3Jeff Gordon482,093-18-43028 15Felix Sabates1786-1,325-616128 10Rob Kauffman152,063-48-19-128 20John Henry17700-1,411-1920028 19Richard Petty43719-1,392-2319028 48Roger Penske127-2,104-34801 37Joe Falk33363-1,748-1637028 34Ron Devine93388-1,723-834028 12Walter Czarnecki222,042-69-712028 9Tony Stewart392,064-47-58-128 32Tommy Baldwin7444-1,667-3932028 41Glen Wood21186-1,925-304109 38Frank Stoddard Jr.32362-1,749-138028 33Brandon Davis30396-1,715-4833028 49J D Gibbs814-2,107-34902 18Richard Childress27742-1,369-1017-128 14Roger Penske2792-1,319-1,24815128 46Bob Keselowski15217-2,094-274605 23Richard Petty9693-1,418022-128 28Harry Scott Jr.51523-1,588027-128 50Larry Gunselman370-2,111-45001last_img read more

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TV a sleep detriment in children, study finds

first_imgA study following more than 1,800 children from ages 6 months to nearly 8 years old found a small but consistent association between increased television viewing and shorter sleep duration.The report, by investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children and the Harvard School of Public Health, is featured in the May issue of Pediatrics.Participants in the study, children and their mothers, were enrolled in Project Viva, a long-term investigation of the health effects of several factors during pregnancy and after birth. It analyzed information — reported by mothers when the children were around 6 months old and then annually for the next seven years — regarding how much time each day infants were in a room where a television was on, how much time older children watched television a day, whether children ages 4 to 7 slept in a room where a TV was present, and the average daily amount of sleep.Each additional hour of television viewing was associated with seven fewer minutes of sleep a night, with the effects appearing to be stronger in boys than in girls.  Racial and ethnic minority children were much more likely to sleep in a room where a television was present, and among those children, the presence of a bedroom television reduced average sleep by around 30 minutes a night.The authors noted that the results supported previous short-term studies finding that both television viewing and sleeping in a room with a television decrease total sleep time, which can have negative effects on mental and physical health.last_img read more

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Bells Are Ringing! Meet Michael Arden & the Cast of Paper Mill’s Hunchback

first_imgRehearsals are officially underway for the Paper Mill Playhouse production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame! Michael Arden, Ciara Renee, Patrick Page, Andrew Samonsky, Erik Liberman and more stars are reprising their roles from last year’s run at the La Jolla Playhouse in California—welcome back to the East Coast, guys, we missed you. Check out these Hot Shots of the stars above, and composer Alan Menken, choreographer Chase Brock, director Scott Schwartz, book writer Peter Parnell and lyricist Stephen Schwartz below. Catch The Hunchback of Notre Dame at Paper Mill in Millburn, NJ from March 4 through April 5, with an official opening night on March 15. View Commentslast_img

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VINS gets $30,000 from TransCanada for environmental education programs

first_imgWith more than 60 years’ experience, TransCanada is a leader in the responsible development and reliable operation of North American energy infrastructure, including hydroelectric power generation, natural gas and oil pipelines, and gas storage facilities.  A growing independent power producer, TransCanada owns or has interests in more than 10,800 megawatts of power generation in Canada and the United States.  For more information, visitwww.transcanada.com(link is external), and follow on Twitter @TransCanada. VINS is a nonprofit, member-supported environmental education, research, and avian rehabilitation organization based in Quechee, VT.  Through partnerships and collaborations with other conservation and education organizations, VINS makes high-quality, compelling and fun environmental education programs and learning opportunities accessible to people and communities throughout New England.  For more information, visit the VINS website at www.vinsweb.org(link is external) and the VINS Nature Blog at vtnature.blogspot.com. VINS 12.13.2011 ‘Supporting the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and its impressive environmental education work aligns directly with TransCanada’s commitment to the environment and desire to improve the quality of life for residents of Vermont and New England,’ said Matthew Cole, Community Relations Advisor for TransCanada.  ‘We realize the importance of these programs to the success and growth of healthy, vibrant communities.’ The Vermont Institute of Natural Science (VINS) has been awarded a $30,000 Community Investment grant from TransCanada, an energy infrastructure company with operations throughout North America including eight hydroelectric stations in Vermont.  The grant has been awarded to support VINS’ conservation and environmental education programs and boost the organization’s fundraising for program outreach in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene. Through its Community Investment program, TransCanada supports local associations and organizations that serve as community assets in empowering individuals, building strong communities, and creating effective citizens.center_img ‘VINS provides innovative, award-winning environmental education opportunities for the children, adults, citizen scientists, and professional educators of New England,’ explained VINS president John Dolan.  ‘TransCanada’s Community Investment grant is a strong vote of confidence in the quality of VINS’ programs and a demonstration of TransCanada’s commitment to our community and VINS’ long-term success.’last_img read more

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October 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actions

first_img October 15, 2003 Regular News T he Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended 15 attorneys, disbarred one, reprimanded two, and extended the probation of one.The following lawyers are disciplined: Damon Evan Amedeo, 3360 S. Ocean Road, Palm Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days from July 22 following an August 1 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) On October 2, 2003, Amedeo was charged with distributing cocaine to a person under the age of 21, a felony, and was sentenced to 216 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1226) Bradford Jon Beilly, 400 S.E. 19th St., Ft. Lauderdale, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Beilly entered a business transaction with a client; failed to provide competent representation to a client; and used information relating to the representation of a former client. (Case no. SC02-2651) Rendell Frederick Brown, 319 Clematis St., Ste. 217, West Palm Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. Upon his reinstatement, Brown shall commence serving a two-year probation. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) Brown failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; neglected to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation; charged or collected excessive fees; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-152) Virginia B. Chosed, 14151 98th Court, Miami, probation extended until August 1, 2004, following an August 18 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Chosed failed to comply with her rehabilitation contract with Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc., which was a condition of her court ordered probation in case no. SC03-646. (Case no. SC00-918) Mark Charles Dabold, 5401 S. Kirkman Road, Ste. 310, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 28 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Dabold failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-406) Mitchell Denker, P.O. Box 999, Summerfield, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days from August 5 following an August 14 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1975) On July 14, Denker was adjudicated guilty in Vermont on two counts of transporting monetary instruments and perjury, both felonies. Denker was sentenced to serve five months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1298) Michael Wilson Dugger, 1017 Thomasville Road, Ste. A, Tallahassee, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1970) Dugger failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter. (Case no. SC02-2623) Jose L. DelCastillo-Salamanca, 255 Main St., Floor 2, Hartford, CT., suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) DelCastillo-Salamanca failed to competently and diligently represent a client and failed to respond to the Bar during its investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC01-1696) Steven K. Grover, 868 99th Ave., N., Ste. 1, Naples, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1997) Grover failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-163). Jordan B. Harlem, 3050 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 600, Miami, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 28 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 2000) Harlem failed to designate an official Bar name, mailing address, and business telephone number; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; charged or collected excessive fees; and failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-450) Shawn M. Jordan, 2820 N.W. 135th St., Opa Locka, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) Jordan failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2566) Jeffrey David Knowlton, 500 N. Harbor City Blvd., Melbourne, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) Among several Bar violations, Knowlton failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to respond, in writing, to official Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; and failed to take reasonable steps to protect a client’s interests upon misrepresentation. (Case nos. SC02-2076, SC02-2638, SC03-407) Terrence Leon Laster, P.O. Box 822932, Dallas, TX, suspended by emergency from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following an August 19 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) A reconstruction of Laster’s trust accounts revealed a large shortage and failed to provide a current address and business telephone number to The Florida Bar. (Case no. SC03-1402) Joey Dean Oquist, 1135 9th St., N., St. Petersburg, suspended from practicing law in Florida for seven days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Oquist failed to keep a client reasonably informed and failed to supervise a subordinate. (Case no. SC02-2004) L. Byron Reid, P.O. Box 607, Panama City, suspended from practicing law in Florida for three years, effective immediately following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1992) Reid violated several Bar rules including involvement in misconduct, minor misconduct, and criminal misconduct; knowingly made a false statement to The Florida Bar; misrepresentation; and conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC02-2079) Reydel Santos, P.O. Box 5000, Yazoo City, MS., suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following an August 14 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Santos was adjudicated guilty in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida on Nov. 3, 2000, for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and possession with intent to distribute cocaine, both felonies. Santos was sentenced to serve 121 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-1316) Billy Michael Thomas, 997 S. Wickham Road, W. Melbourne, reprimanded for professional misconduct, following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1992) Thomas failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiry by Bar counsel while conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2125) Henry Thompson, 14815 S.W. 107th Ave., Miami, suspended from the practice of law for 10 days, effective 30 days following an August 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1971) Among several Bar violations, Thompson filed nonmeritorious claims and contentions; failed to act fairly to opposing party and counsel; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC02-2717) Alexander Zouzoulas, 2070 Saint George Ave., Winter Park, suspended from practicing law in Florida for six months, effective retroactive to January 4 following an August 21 court order. Zouzoulas is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Zouzoulas failed to comply with probationary terms in Case no. SC02-2042. Among terms of his probation, Zouloulas must contact Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. (Case no. SC02-2042) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. October 15, 2003 Disciplinary Actionslast_img read more

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The leadership labyrinth

first_imgEvening in an office ushers in an odd tranquility. With the departure of the workforce, the daily hubbub of conversation, machine noise and human movement ceases. The scene changes to a few remaining workers who hunch over their desks absorbed in projects or quiet. The atmosphere is one of enveloping calm and deep concentration.For an executive, evening has a different breed of quiet. Without employees, vendors, or investors filling the doorframe, it can present a moment of disconcerting emptiness. The usual distractions of the business day that so automatically structure the time disappear. No one is around to ask for input, bring up a new problem or harp on an organizational complaint.At this moment arrives a critical choice. Always in plain view loom unsorted emails, reports, and requests beckoning executive attention. Indeed, such items require attention, and doing things that need doing does move things forward. The feeling of satisfaction that comes with checking things off a list is hard to resist. continue reading » 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Sagaponack Man Accused of Setting Fire to Patchogue Bar

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An alleged arsonist who was previously accused of setting fire to a $34 million oceanfront Hamptons mansion is facing new charges of allegedly trying to burn down a Patchogue bar last year.David Osiecki pleaded not guilty Dec. 18 at Suffolk County court to an additional charge of arson.Prosecutors said the 54-year-old Sagaponack man used his cigar to set a decorative bale of hay afire at Off Key Tiki Bar on Baker Place following an argument with the owner of the establishment on Nov. 3, 2013.The fire caused major damage but no injuries.Osiecki was previously charged with arson for allegedly setting fire to a seven-bedroom, eight-bathroom house on Dune Road in Bridgehampton on April 14, 2014.Judge Fernando Comacho ordered him held without bail on Dec. 18. Osiecki is due back in court on Feb. 6.last_img read more

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Canada to boost feed restrictions to prevent BSE

first_img A Canadian Broadcasting Corp. report on the CFIA announcement said that it fell short of critics’ demands that all animal parts be removed from all animal feed. The Canadian action pertains to specified risk materials (SRMs)—tissues that, in infected cattle, harbor the abnormal prion proteins that cause BSE. SRMs generally include the skull, brain, spinal cord, eyes, tonsils, vertebral column, small intestine, and certain nerve bundles. Both Canada and the United States require the removal of SRMs from carcasses intended for human consumption. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) did not say when the restriction would take effect. US officials, in announcing their preliminary decision, suggested it would be several months to a year or longer before the restriction would be imposed. The purpose of banning SRMs from all animal feeds is to reduce the risk of cross-contamination in feed manufacturing, whereby SRMs used in chicken or pig feed could enter cattle feed if both kinds of feed were made with the same equipment. A ban would also limit the risk from giving cattle the wrong kind of feed. The CFIA noted that an international team that reviewed Canada’s response to the BSE case found in Alberta last year “strongly endorsed” the removal of SRMs from all animal feed. “Feed restrictions are universally recognized as the critical measure to contain the spread of BSE,” the agency said. Cattle contract BSE by eating protein from infected cattle. Both Canada and the United States banned the use of cattle materials in feed for cattle and other ruminant animals in 1997. However, cattle protein is still used in feed for nonruminant farm animals (pigs, chickens, horses) and in pet food. Canada announced the decision Jul 9, the same day the US government said it had tentatively decided to take the same step but wanted to gather public comments on the move first. In February, an international team of experts recommended a ban on SRMs in all animal feed as a critical step for preventing the spread of BSE. The team reviewed the US response to the case of BSE discovered in Washington state last December. The CFIA said, “Preventing these potentially infectious materials from entering the entire feed production chain at the start diminishes the effects of potential cross-contamination of ruminant animal feeds that could occur as feed is produced and distributed. Based on risk analyses, removing SRM from animal feed will more quickly reduce the incidence of BSE in North America by preventing future disease spread.” The CFIA said it would introduce a “regulatory proposal to require the removal and redirection of SRM and dead and downer cattle from all animal feed, including pet food.” The agency said it was weighing “various options” for the ban in consultation with numerous stakeholders and other governments, including the United States. See also: Jul 13, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – The Canadian government has announced it will ban high-risk cattle parts from all animal feeds, including pet food, as a further step to prevent the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Jul 9 CIDRAP News story, “FDA sets BSE-related rules but delays action on feed”last_img read more

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IPE Scholarship Fund awards grant to PAYG research

first_imgThe IPE Pensions Scholarship Fund has made a full grant of €5,000 to Humberto Godínez-Olivares, a PhD candidate at The University of Liverpool undertaking research into pay-as-you-go (PAYG) pension systems, with special attention into automatic balancing mechanisms (ABMs) within public pension provision.“An aim of the project is to design an ABM to restore the sustainability of PAYG pension systems based on minimising changes in the main variables, such as the contribution rate, normal retirement age and indexation of pensions,” Godínez-Olivares said. He said the main purpose of the ABMs was to re-establish the financial equilibrium of PAYG pensions by adapting the system to changes in socio-economic and demographic conditions.“The overall objectives,” he added, “are to create a credible institutional framework to increase the likelihood that promises of pension payments will be respected and to minimise the use of the pension system as an electoral tool.” Godínez-Olivares is undertaking the research at the Institute for Financial and Actuarial Mathematics, at The University of Liverpool’s Department of Mathematical Sciences, under the supervision of Carmen Boado-Penas, director of the Actuarial Mathematics Programme at the department.He expects to complete his PhD in 2016.Supporting Godínez-Olivares’ application, Boado-Penas said PAYG pension systems were a topic of debate in most economies, mainly due to population ageing, yet “there are few economists and actuaries with expertise in this area”.She added: “I certainly consider this an excellent subject area in which to carry out research.”       Fennell Betson, founding editor of IPE and chair of the IPE Pensions Scholarship Fund board, said: “The IPE Scholarship Fund is delighted to provide this funding to Humberto. This is the first time we have made an award for research into public pensions.”The fund’s awards are made by a board comprising Chris Verhaegen, member of the Occupational Pensions Stakeholder Group at EIOPA; Peter Melchior, executive director at PKA Pension Fund in Denmark; and Peter Borgdorff, executive director at PFZW in the Netherlands.The fund’s academic adviser is Debbie Harrison, visiting professor at the Pensions Institute, Cass Business School, in London.This is the fourth award made by the fund to a student undertaking pensions research at a European university.Further details are available from Fennell Betson ([email protected]) or at IPE’s Scholarship website.last_img read more

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IMCA Modified winner at Outlaw’s Spring Nationals banks $1,200

first_imgDUNDEE, N.Y. – Outlaw Speedway’s Spring Nationals sports a $1,200 IMCA Modified main event and a couple opportunities for drivers to pick up some extra cash on opening night.The Friday, April 21 headliner is a Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier and IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Dirt Works Eastern Region, Allstar Performance State and track points will be awarded.Top 12 qualifiers from heat races during the April 20 Thursday Night Thunder program will be entered in a $150 to win dash for cash. The “B” feature winner also earns $150.Pit gates open at 3 p.m. on Thursday and 4 p.m. Friday. Hot laps are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. both nights.Thursday grandstand admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and free for kids 12 and under. Pit passes are $20. On Friday, admission is $22 for adults, $20 for seniors and free for kids. Pit passes will be $40.Camping will be free. A bonfire and DJ are in plans for Friday night at Dundee. Both Thursday and Friday programs will be broadcast by IMCA.TV.More information is available from promoter Tyler Siri at 607 243-8686, on Facebook and at the www.outlawspeedway.llc.com website.last_img read more

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