For Movember, a professor shaves his ’stache

first_img Read Full Story A group of men in Harvard’s medical community are growing mustaches in November to raise awareness and money for men’s health, particularly prostate and testicular cancer, as part of an international effort called “Movember.”Harvard School of Public Health’s Meir Stampfer, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, took the opposite tack — he shaved his 40-year-old mustache to boost the fundraising effort of the Harvard Movember team. In an Oct. 27 Harvard Crimson article, Stampfer called his mustache “part of my identity” but said he was ready to shave it off if it would help stimulate interest in prostate cancer research. Stampfer has been a leading author of studies on prostate, colon, and breast cancer.The Harvard team reached its goal of raising $40,000 even before November began — and Stampfer followed through with a public shave on Oct. 30.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s seeks to spark participation in annual fundraising event

first_imgSaint Mary’s is hosting its sixth annual 24-Hour Donor Challenge, an event during which students, alumnae and families associated with Saint Mary’s donate to the College.Christine Swarm, director of annual giving, said in an email the event primarily aims to garner revenue, but also hopes to foster community among individuals who support Saint Mary’s.“The 24-hour Donor Challenge is a single-day fundraising event for [Saint Mary’s],” Swarm said. “This is an opportunity for alumnae, students, parents, faculty, staff and friends to come together to support current and future Saint Mary’s students. This year, the 24-hour Donor Challenge begins at [midnight] Thursday … and concludes at midnight [Friday].”Swarm said the initial goals for the campaign are to have 4,000 people donate to Saint Mary’s before the end of the event and to have 1,844 people donate before noon.“The goals are to rally 4,000 donors in 24 hours,” she said. “If we reach that, the College will receive $100,000 in Annual Fund challenge gifts from four alumnae. And, if we secure 1,844 donors before noon EST, we have the opportunity to receive an additional $25,000 Annual Fund challenge gift.”Additional goals depend on who donates, Swarm said, for money from certain demographics can dramatically increase the overall total.”Even further, if by midnight on Thursday, 1,000 Belles of the Last Decade [BOLD] alumnae give, we secure $10,000 more,” she said. “If 2,000 BOLDer alumnae [graduates between 1900 and 2007] give, we secure $10,000 more. If 500 current students give, we secure $5,000 more. And if 500 parents of alumnae or students give, we secure $5,000 more.”Events around campus will promote the 24-Hour Donor Challenge and attempt to engage the community in direct participation, Swarm said.“With the help of our student volunteers from Class Gift Campaign, there will be refreshments and snacks available at our tables on campus throughout the day,” she said. “We will be present in the dining hall, the Great Hall in Le Mans, Spes Unica and the Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex.”Social media platforms offer more extensive information, Swarm said, in an attempt to reach individuals not currently on campus who still wish to contribute.“People can follow the Donor Challenge activity on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @BellesGiveBack or donorchallenge.saintmarys.edu,” she said.The 24-Hour Donor Challenge is important because it encourages reflection about Saint Mary’s, Swarm said.“It is an opportunity for alumnae, students and friends to reflect on the value of a Saint Mary’s education and why this experience is worthy of support,” she said.The total amount of money will enhance Saint Mary’s overall, Swarm said.“Gifts to the Annual Fund support current operations of the College and allow for immediate delivery of the programs and resources that provide Saint Mary’s women with an excellent academic and intellectual experience,” Swarm said. “These gifts go to work where the need is greatest at the College and support scholarships and financial aid, excellent faculty, technology and learning, student life and faith development and campus renewal and preservation.”Tags: 24-hour donor challenge, Belles Give Back, BOLD, Class Gift Campaignlast_img read more

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Size matters when selecting crape myrtles

first_imgLike people, crape myrtles come in all shapes and sizes. And thanks to horticulture breeding programs, today there are crape myrtles to fit any landscape space.Unfortunately, crape myrtles are commonly butchered in the winter landscape in an attempt to make a large plant fit a small space. Thankfully, they tolerate all sorts of abuse. However, it doesn’t make sense to prune off 15 feet of growth each year and leave unsightly stubs when you could simply buy a plant that only grows to the desired height. With the wide variety of crape myrtle selections on the market today, there is no longer a need to fight your landscape during pruning season.Most of the old crape myrtles common in your grandmother’s garden were the taller types that consistently grew 20 to 40 feet tall. In the olden days, flower color was more important than plant height because all crape myrtles grew tall. Then, 20 years ago, a crape myrtle breeding program at the National Arboretum introduced many smaller types and gave most of them Native American names like Cherokee, Tonto, Osage, Hopi and Pecos. The breeding programs have also resulted in better disease resistance, attractive fall color and exfoliating bark. For large spaces, consider Natchez, a white cultivar that grows 20 to 30 feet tall. Other good selections in the large size category include Miami with dark pink flowers, Muskogee with light lavender flowers or Dynamite with bright red flowers. For smaller spaces, selections growing 10 to 20 feet include Osage with clear-pink flowers, Yuma with lavender flowers and Cherokee with dark red flowers.Pecos has medium-pink flowers, Acoma has white flowers and Tonto has red flowers – all are good selections in the 5 to 10 feet range. Excellent selections in the 3 to 5 feet range include Cherry Dazzle with red flowers, Snow Dazzle with white flowers, Dazzle Me Pink with bright pink flowers and Cordon Bleu with lavender-blue flowers. If you need a smaller plant, consider the crape myrtlettes introduced by growers in Louisiana. Selections include Delta Blush with clear-pink blooms, which grows to 18 inches, Pixie White, which grows to 24 inches, or New Orleans, a purple selection that grows only 6 to 12 inches tall. For more information on crape myrtles, check out the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences web-based publication at www.caes.uga.edu/Publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=6861&pg=np&ct=crape%20myrtle&kt=&kid=&pid=.last_img read more

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$6 million in Vermont emergency agricultural stimulus loans closed in 90 days

first_imgIn the roughly ninety days since the program was announced, the Vermont Economic Development Authority s (VEDA s) Farm Operating Loan Program (FOLP) has approved over $6 million in emergency agricultural stimulus loans to help 107 Vermont farmers with spring operating needs. The special low-interest stimulus financing was facilitated through VEDA s agricultural subsidiary, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation (VACC). The special agricultural stimulus financing was loaned at a variable rate as low as 2%. The average loan amount approved for farmers through the emergency stimulus funding program has been just over $58,000. The economic challenges faced by Vermont s farm community are the most severe in generations, said Jo Bradley, the VEDA s Chief Executive Officer. As a result, many farmers needed to restructure debt quickly through refinancing, or seek assistance with spring operating needs. This program has served as an interim safety net to help farmers help themselves until pricing relief could be enacted at the federal level, said Bradley. Since FOLP s launch, VACC has handled an unprecedented number of agricultural loans in a very short period of time.For more information about the Farm Operating Loan Program, farmers may visit www.veda.org(link is external), or call VACC directly, toll-free, at 1-866-828-FARM (3276).VACC is a nonprofit corporation which provides credit to farmers and agricultural facilities who are not having their financing needs fully met by conventional agricultural credit sources. Loans are available from VACC to strengthen existing farm operations, encourage diversification, support beginning farmers and to encourage marketing and processing of Vermont agricultural products.VEDA s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.4 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.Source: VEDA.last_img read more

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Joint Fiscal Office lowers budget gap projection to $46 million

first_imgby Anne Galloway vtdigger.org The state’s budget shortfall has been nearly cut in half, according to new information from the Joint Fiscal Office, the Legislature’s nonpartisan fiscal research arm.Steve Klein, the chief fiscal officer for JFO, told the House Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday that the budget gap, which had been pegged at $74.5 million in November in a consensus forecast with the Shumlin administration, had been revised downward to $46 million.Stephen Klein, chief fiscal officer of the Vermont Legislative Fiscal Office presents budget information to the House Ways and Means Committee. VTD/Josh LarkinKlein said Medicaid costs were $16 million less than expected and assumptions for the budget adjustment (the mid-year true up of the state budget) were $13 million lower than anticipated (in effect, base spending was flat in the first six months of the fiscal year, and the budget adjustment increase was zero).The number of Vermonters who use Medicaid services has declined, and utilization rates have also gone down, Klein told lawmakers. JFO estimated a 6 percent growth rate for the program.Officially, the gap forecast is still $74.5 million until the Shumlin administration confirms the numbers and agrees to consensus figures, Klein said. He called the new shortfall figure of $46 million a ‘placeholder number.’Contributing factors to the gap include:â ¢ $13.6 million use of one-time fundsâ ¢ $19.6 million related to a 1 percent increase in the Medicaid match rateâ ¢ $25 million in additional pension obligations and health care costs for retired teachers and state workersâ ¢ $7 million for technology infrastructure replacementâ ¢ $8 million in transfers, $6 million to the Education Fund and $2 million from reservesâ ¢ $4 million in rest area funding pressureâ ¢ $10 million for autism treatment costsKlein predicted that the governor would delay implementation of the ‘autism mandate,’ a requirement that the state pay for specialized services for young children with the developmental disability. The mandate is projected to cost about $10 million annually. If the postponement occurs, the budget gap projection would drop to $36 million, according to Klein.Klein explained that the budget shortfall projections are now calculated by JFO based on predicted total changes in expenditures rather than a straight percentage based on past budgeting. This shift caused a disconnect last fall between JFO and the administration when the two parties didn’t issue a consensus gap analysis because they had calculated the shortfall differently. JFO based its analysis on a 3.5 percent base increase; the Department of Finance and Management looked at projected pressures reported by departments in state government.The new shortfall number came to light as part of a list of financial issues Klein suggested that House Ways and Means put on its ‘menu’ for the session.The chief fiscal officer told lawmakers that projected revenues for fiscal year 2013 will be $41.6 million higher than the current fiscal year.The new revenue forecast will be presented to the Emergency Board on Jan. 18 ‘ the week after the governor’s budget address. Klein said Shumlin will seek language from the Legislature that will give him the flexibility to salt away unanticipated revenues in reserve funds.At this time, the state has $17 million in the Emergency Relief and Assistance Fund, which will be used to cover unanticipated Irene costs; $22 million in the Agency of Human Services caseload reserve fund, which is often used to buy down the state’s Medicaid match; $1.9 million in contingency money for federal cuts to programs; $3.88 million in a one-time setaside that kicks in when revenue forecasts exceed $10 million. The revenue shortfall reserve fund, a new ‘all-purpose’ vehicle for reserve monies funded by the Legislature in the last session, may be reupped this year. The state also has roughly $55 million in the budget stabilization fund.State officials say it’s crucial to have plenty of money available in reserve because of the uncertain economic environment and because Congress, in debt reduction mode, will likely reduce funding for state programs.Other details discussed by the committee included:*A possible sales tax for ‘cloud computing’ revenues;*A review of the cigarette tax, which has generated $2 million over the forecast, despite warnings from grocers and others that a 38 cent hike in the tax would depress sales and send Vermonters to New Hampshire to buy smokes;*A change in the trigger for the Amazon tax for online sales; Rep. Jeff Wilson said he’ll introduce a bill that would mirror an agreement between the giant Internet retailer and California officials that goes into effect in 2013;*December revenues from corporate earnings and business quarterly payments were lower than expected.The draft release of the Picus report on Vermont’s education finance system will be on Wednesday. A public hearing on the report will be held on Jan. 9 via remote interactive television; a final report will be issued on Jan. 18. www.vtdigger.org(link is external) January 4, 2012last_img read more

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Neko’s Comeback

first_imgHow did downhill biking phenom Neko Mulally rediscover his mountain biking mojo? He built a bike park.A torrential downpour is pounding Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia, and there’s talk of canceling the men’s U.S. Nationals downhill championship, in which case podiums will be awarded based on Saturday’s qualifying runs. This should be welcome news to Neko Mulally, who already took first in qualies.Mulally is ruminating on the possibilities. While a cancelation would make him national champ, shortcuts have never held much appeal to the 25-year-old pro. Deep down he wants another run.“He takes the long way round,” says friend and business partner Sean Leader. “He believes in hard work.”Mulally‘s penchant for work has compelled him to move mountains, or at least reshape them. In eastern Tennessee he and Lider have built their own downhill park and training facility, an epiphanic experience for the young athlete.“It changed my perspective,” Mulally said. “Getting on the podium isn’t the only thing that matters. There’s more to life than just winning the race. It taught me balance.”These days nothing surpasses the pleasure of pushing his boundaries in the company of his friends, a whole new crop of downhill competitors who are thriving thanks to Neko’s leadership.   When the announcement comes through that the national championship race will take place, albeit on a slippery track, Mullaly is stoked.The 25-year-old pro kits up and takes to the starting gate brimming with confidence.   “When you go into a race knowing you can win, it’s the best best feeling.”Alongside his little brother Logan Mulally, Neko began racing BMX at the tender age of six in their home state of Pennsylvania. Their father, an avid mountain biker, pushed them into BMX in order to build their skills early. When Neko was 13 he competed in his first downhill race at Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia.With pinpoint precision and hit-it-wide-open bravado, Mulally developed a reputation as one of the best youngsters in the East. Mulally crashed the party hard in 2014 when took fifth at a World Cup race in Australia and then followed it with a legendary run at the World Cup Finals in Norway. Within seconds of busting out of the starting gate, his chain broke and flopped onto the the dusty track.        “I rode on instinct,” Mulally said of his miraculous performance. “I was able to do stuff. I never practiced.”Mulally’s star began rising rapidly. He attracted sponsorships from Scott and Oskar Blues, earned $200,000, and bought a house in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina.In both 2015 and 2016, injuries plagued Mullaly, and he struggled to recapture the magic of his breakout season.“He was struggling,” said Logan Mulally. “It was a big mental game. He just didn’t know how he could get back on top.”     In the winter of 2016, discontented and restless, Mullaly approached his friend and fellow racer Sean Lider about building a downhill course. Mulally hoped that such a project would reinvigorate his career and rekindle his fire.Furthermore, both riders wanted to see a downhill renaissance in the Southeast. In a region where mountain biking had exploded in recent years, downhill riding has been conspicuously underplayed.“The first year was just Neko and myself busting ass,” said Leader.The duo sculpted trail inspired by the downhill courses they had competed on around the world. “Windrock is unique because we have the freedom to develop this place however we want,” says Lider.The gnarly, steep terrain immediately attracted a following of dedicated competitors, World Cup stars like Walker Shaw, Dakota Norton, and Max Morgan.“It gives me a place to train that is similar to the conditions we ride in Europe,” says Norton. “From the rider’s perspective it is everything we could ask for. I’ve built my entire career at that bike park and on that mountain.”Rivalries and friendships abound as the Windrock has become a hamlet of downhill athletes. In the off-season, a slew of trailers arrive at Leader’s, where a nonstop routine of pumptrack riding, motocross, and downhilling begins.“Three of the top 30 in the world practice at my place,” said Mulally. “They train on my mountain. I am happy about that.”Logan Mulally says his big brother warmly embraces the extra competition that comes with the scene he’s cultivating.“It’s brought all the riders up a level,” Logan said. “He’s bringing his friends with him. He’d rather see one of those guys win than some European.”Aside from a training ground, Windrock is open to the public and also home to a Southeast Downhill Series and the Windrock Enduro. When Neko isn’t training he’ll jump into one of their old trucks and run shuttles. Embracing the bike park’s everyday chores and sharing in the stoke is a big part of Neko’s new-found zen, says Lider.“He comes up here on his day off all the time. He likes just seeing the scene. He’s here because he loves it.”   Mulally and Leader say a growing number of novices and young riders now frequent the mountain, especially as they develop more trails. In Windrock downhill has taken hold.“The younger kids who come are pretty good riders,” says Neko. “It’s cool to see they are products of our scene.”As the starting gate buzzes, clicks, and parts open, Mulally smoothly glides out. He picks and flows his way down the chundery track, riding a razor’s edge of calculation and euphoric abandon.“It was the Neko we’d seen in 2014: calm, relaxed, having a good time with his friends,” says Logan Mulally of that national championship run.Mulally crosses the line with a time of 3:11:121, winning by only a half-second. Climbing the podium, the national champion is all smiles.“He’s back with that desire,” said Norton. “This whole process of building this bike park has given him a sense of clarity about what he wants.”“I am proud of all the guys that ride at our spot,” says Mulally. “We all ride together all the time. Sometimes I win. Sometimes they win. We do that all winter long.”last_img read more

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Human Rights Dialogue Between Guatemalan Military

first_imgBy Dialogo February 21, 2013 SOUTHCOM’s Human Rights Office sponsored a civil-military dialogue on February 6 – 7 in Guatemala to bring together influential human rights groups and senior Guatemalan Military leaders. Significantly, all the invited human rights group participated. The dialogue was designed to promote reconciliation, improve cooperation and foster a more productive working relationship between the Guatemalan Military and influential civil-society groups. The meetings included intense – but productive and respectful – discussions and the development of a draft framework outlining how the Guatemalan military and civil groups will frame their dialogue to address present human rights concerns and prevent future violations. The framework will be addressed again during a second dialogue meeting scheduled for later this summer. Senior attendees included the Guatemalan Minister of Defense, Brigadier General Ulises Anzueto Giron, Deputy Chief of Mission Bruce Williamson, and SOUTHCOM’s Director of Strategy, Policy, and Plans, Brigadier General Mark C. Nowland.last_img read more

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Improve leader-employee communication to improve business

first_imgIn the face of a hyper-competitive, quickly and continuously shifting business environment, the standard nine-to-five workday doesn’t exist anymore. Employees are working past that, working at home and on weekends.“They’re fully connected all the time,” said Rajeev Behera, CEO of Reflektive, a human resources software startup.This high-intensity work culture has increasingly become a way of life in business, whether it’s a startup company infused with investor cash to grow, perform and yield results fast, or a publicly traded company that has to perform as well as respond to disruption and fast-changing market needs. Behera said the problem is employees may be working harder, but not necessarily smarter. Nor are they delivering against company goals in the process. Better communication is needed to ensure employees are working on tasks that deliver results. It requires dialogue; it can’t be an edict from the top.Right now, however, it’s common for leadership to lay out goals for the organization with little intelligence from the people on the ground. Behera said this only perpetuates high-intensity work environments. The resulting pressure cooker culture prompts people to give the perception that they’re working harder, which they are, but they have less time to prioritize and think strategically about what will make an impact. The result is a burnt-out worker who isn’t as productive as they could be because they focus on responsibilities of lesser importance to the business, Behera said. Worse, this issue can produce a network effect where not just one person has devoted time, energy, talent and other resources to the wrong cause, but an entire team’s efforts were misdirected. continue reading » 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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ICUD and local development opportunity for young professionals

first_imgThe month of October is a great time of year that hosts one of my personal favorite holidays:  no, not Halloween or the “unofficial holiday” of the annual Homecoming Football Game. October 17th is International Credit Union Day!  With this year’s theme of “Local Service, Global Reach”, our movement continues to recognize the positive impact we have on our communities.  The theme of local service also creates great opportunities for Young Professionals in the movement to develop personally and professionally. If you are a YP looking to advance your career in Credit Unions, here are some great ways to do so through the theme of local service.  Volunteer:   The most common – and easiest – way you can grow through local services is through volunteering.  Local charities, soup kitchens, animal shelters, senior care facilities, schools, libraries…the list of places and things you can do from a local volunteer perspective can be endless!  Carve out some time in your schedule on a regular basis to give back by volunteering, and make sure to take advantage of local volunteer opportunities offered by your Credit Union. You’ll meet amazing people, perform good deeds, and strengthen your professional profile.  Most importantly, you will gain valuable perspective and personal fulfillment!Plan a Local Donation Drive:  Many local charities and organizations that do not offer robust volunteer opportunities will gladly accept donations, and often will assist you in organizing a donation drive.  Reach out to local community groups to see what they are in need of, and use the power of local and social networking to spread the word! Even if you only end up with a few boxes or bags of goods to give back, your efforts will be admired and appreciated, and develop great leadership and organization skills for future growth.  Organize Meet Ups:  A great way to build your local network and develop professionally is by working with your local Credit Union colleagues, chapter or league to organize Young Professional Meet-Ups!  Meet-ups are a great way to bring like-minded YPs together in a fun and engaging setting, and you can even extend invitations out to YPs from other local businesses, which will help you become a better networker and team-player.  Plus, hosting meet-ups at locally-owned businesses in your area is a great way to display our movement’s focus on community development and people helping people.  Join A Local Board or Committee:   If you are looking to get more deeply involved in giving back to your local community – and want to enhance your time management skills – then consider running for or joining a local community board or committee.  Many of these groups, just like Credit Unions, are looking for young professionals to bring energy, enthusiasm and fresh ideas to the table. Furthermore, you will be able to gain valuable insights and perspective from experienced board members, learn new skills and help shape the future direction of your local community.  These are just some of the many ways Young Professionals can grow personally and professionally by giving back to their local community, and your Credit Union will surely appreciate your positive representation and embodiment of their brand and promise.  So what are you waiting for? Get out there and start giving back! 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michael Mattone Michael Mattone is the Vice President of Marketing and Member Experience at Hudson River Financial FCU, a $60 million credit union serving members who live, work or worship in Westchester, … Web: https://hudsonriverfinancial.org Detailslast_img read more

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Tackling to be banned in training and pitches disinfected in Premier League’s plan for Project Restart

first_img Comment Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 12 May 2020 9:06 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3kShares The Premier League stands to lose £750m if the season is not restarted (Picture: Getty)The government is keen to bring football back to ‘boost the morale of the nation’, though a recent study from YouGov showed that 73% of Brits surveyed would not feel that way about football’s return.A number of players have openly aired their reservations about returning, notably England and Tottenham defender Danny Rose who said: ‘Football shouldn’t even be spoken about until the numbers have dropped massively. People’s lives are at risk.’MORE: Project Restart: Premier League can scrap neutral venues ideaMORE: ‘I don’t give a f**k about the nation’s morale’: Danny Rose slams Project Restart plansFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. FIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirusTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:43FullscreenFIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirushttps://metro.co.uk/video/fifa-team-five-ways-tackle-spread-coronavirus-2131812/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Now a list of directives has been sent to players and managers regarding the next phase of training, with the BBC reporting that players will be banned from tackling for the foreseeable future.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT Visit our live blog for the latest updates Coronavirus news livePremier League bosses hope training can resume next Monday, with a further meeting between clubs scheduled for the same day to progress talks over restarting the campaign.Players will initially be restricted to groups of five and will have to observe two metre gaps between each other, with no contact permitted.Phase two will follow several weeks later and see entire first-team squads back on the pitch together, though it remains to be seen if tackling and contact will be reintroduced even at that stage.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errorsPlaying surfaces, corner flags, balls, cones, goalposts and all equipment used in training will be disinfected before and after every session, which will be restricted to no more than 75 minutes.Players will be tested for Covid-19 twice a week and take a daily pre-training questionnaire and temperature check, while they will be encouraged to maintain ‘meticulous’ personal hygiene and use PPE.center_img Tackling to be banned in training and pitches disinfected in Premier League’s plan for Project Restart The Premier League will try to limit contract as much as possible in training (Picture: Getty)The Premier League intends to ban tackling and disinfect pitches in the first phase of Project Restart, with players asked to strictly observe social distancing guidelines even when on the pitch.Representatives from all 20 Premier League clubs met on Friday as they try to formulate a plan to restart the season, though there have been a number of disagreements over how that should be achieved.Plans to stage matches at neutral venues have now been scrapped, while the bottom six clubs are adamant they will not play unless relegation is scrapped – something the Football Association have forbid. Advertisementlast_img read more

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