When religion and spirituality collide

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Br. John-Anthony OSBCn, Canon Community of St. Aidan, Victoria, BC says: [Religion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, the leader of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion, recently announced that he would step down by year’s end. A few days later, the Church of England rejected a Williams-backed unity plan for global Anglicanism, a church fractured by issues of gender and sexual identity. The timing of the resignation and the defeat are probably not coincidental. These events signal Anglicans’ institutional failure.But why should anyone, other than Anglicans and their Episcopal cousins in the U.S., care? The Anglican fight over gay clergy is usually framed as a left and right conflict, part of the larger saga of political division. But this narrative obscures a more significant tension in Western societies: the increasing gap between spirituality and religion, and the failure of traditional religious institutions to learn from the divide.Until recently, the archbishop of Canterbury was chief pastor for a global church bound by a common liturgy and Anglican religious identity.Expectations for religious leaders were clear: Run the church with courage and vision. Bishops directed the laity, inspiring obedience, sacrifice and heroism; they ordered faith from the top.Today’s world, however, is different.All institutions are being torn apart by tension between two groups: those who want to reassert familiar and tested leadership patterns — including top-down control, uniformity and bureaucracy; and those who want to welcome untested but promising patterns of the emerging era — grass-roots empowerment, diversity and relational networks. It is not a divide between conservatives and liberals; rather, it is a divide between institution and spirit.Top-down structures are declining. In the Anglicans’ case, spiritual and institutional leadership have been severed. The emerging vision maintains that spiritual leadership must be learned, earned and experienced distinct from, and often in tension with, the ascribed role of bishop.Williams’ career is a public illustration of the conflict. Early on, Williams was recognized as a teacher and pastor of deep spirituality, a person who practiced what he preached. He had the sort of character and imagination that the Anglican Communion most needed to move toward a new future.And that is where the trouble started — and where the story turns tragic. Williams was caught in an impossible situation. As Anglicans around the globe quarreled over the role of gays and lesbians in the church, the archbishop’s authority was called into question. Williams struggled to be both a spiritual leader who embraces the emerging vision and the leader of an institution committed to guarding the old order.The archbishop might be called “spiritual head” of Anglicanism, but he also acts as CEO of the Anglican religious corporation who must manage company policy, ensure profitability, maintain properties, open new markets and negotiate politics. It is a bureaucracy, often more a religion business than a vibrant spiritual community.For centuries, faith was top-down: Spiritual power flowed from pope to the faithful, archbishop to Anglicans, priest to the pious, pastor to congregation. This has changed as regular people confidently assert that spirituality is a grass-roots adventure of seeking God, a journey of insight and inspiration involving authenticity and purpose that might or might not happen in a church, synagogue or mosque. Spirituality is an expression of bottom-up faith and does not always fit into accepted patterns of theology or practice.Fearing this change, however, many religious bodies, such as the Anglican Communion, increasingly fixate on order and control, leading them to reassert hierarchical authority and be less responsive to the longings of those they supposedly serve. And that will push religion further into its spiral of irrelevance and decline.Williams demonstrated how wide the breach has become between spirituality and religion. His tenure proved that religious institutions — as they currently exist — fail when they refuse to engage the new pattern of faith.The gap between spirit and institution is not only problematic for religious organizations. The gap exists in business, where work and craft have been replaced by venture capital and profitability; in politics, where the common good and democracy are crushed by partisanship and corporate money; in education, where critical thought and the humanities are sacrificed to test scores.The Anglican crisis is not about Rowan Williams or even religion. It is about the drive for meaningful connection and community and a better, more just, and more peaceful world as institutions of church, state and economy seem increasingly unresponsive to these desires. It is about the gap between a new spirit and institutions that have lost their way. Only leaders who can bridge this gap and transform their institutions will succeed in this emerging cultural economy.The archbishop will return to teaching — a good choice. In our times, spiritual renewal is taking place among friends, in conversation, with trust and through mutual learning. A new thing is happening on the streets, in coffeehouses, in local faith communities, and in movements of justice and social change. Far from demands of institutional religion, Rowan Williams will find a new kind of faith is being born.— Diana Butler Bass is the author of eight books, most recently “Christianity After Religion: The End of Church and the Birth of a New Spiritual Awakening.” A version of this commentary originally appeared in USA Today. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Marius Jan Hulswit says: April 19, 2012 at 11:22 am Spiritual renewal has always taken place in the personal, the relational, the connectional. By its very definition we know that must be so. And, as soon as spirituality assumes praxis it is religion. This to say that the conflict is not between religion and spirituality (Lord, we have heard that enough.) It seems to me that the grievous failure of our institutions is self protection at great human cost. This would not be new, i.e. Caiaphas statement about the death of Jesus. As the sheepfold is challenged the shepherd with great urgency and stoney resolve makes the sheepfold impenetrable –some sheep are stiffled and some sheep cannot get in. Sue Thompson says: April 19, 2012 at 12:56 pm I believe we are witnessing the end of an era and the beginning of a new one. People are finally waking up and realizing that the hierarchical structure is just not working! At one time, becoming a priest was a vocation … it has now become a job! People are also realizing that the church in not a playground for popes and potentates. We are now moving in a positive direction by “taking back our church,” even if that means leaving the “institutional church.” The independent movement is on the rise and more and more people are meeting in homes and small rented spaces to focus more on the spiritual aspect of community than the business aspect. This, I believe, is getting back to our roots!Blessings Br. John-Anthony OSBCn, Canon Community of St. Aidan, Victoria, BC says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 18, 2012 at 7:06 pm To say that “for centuries faith was top down: spiritual power flowed from pope to faithful” etc., reveals a breathtaking ignorance of history. Has she never heard`of Francis of Assisi or Martin Luther or John Wesley. It’s been more like the Peter Principle with faith flowing upward until it stultifies at the top. Who was Archbishop of Canterbury when George Herbert was a Vicar? How many bishops can you name for Julian of Norwich’s church?It’s not “the Anglican Communion” that is “fixate(d) on authority” but African bishops and a small minority of Episcopalians who are trying to use authority to frustrate change while the Episcopal Church generally and a great many other Anglicans who are very responsive to a world of rapid change. Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing April 18, 2012 at 7:14 pm I agree with Ms Bass and I think the emergent faith of which she speaks is also happening in some congregations. Not all, certainly, but some. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Vicki Gray says: April 18, 2012 at 7:12 pm My experience specifically points within the Episcopal Church to the rise, institution and full expression and expansion of the Commission on Ministry model in regard to the demise of confident, capable, caring and in touch leadership and the subsequent growth of mediocrity over the last thirty plus years in the emergence of clergy (most especially those coming in as second career types) who mirror a church folk who want only tepid and highly feminized nurturing. I am not speaking about women clergy but clergy whose abilities are narrowly focused on maintaining declining demographically challenged hospice like cultures. As well, our governing and managing structures with bishops, staffs, PB and staff, House of Bishops and Executive Council look to managing scarcity rather than seeking a spiritual transformation found only in blunt self criticism. In five to ten more years, the combination of mediocre clergy and lay leadership, sightless episcopal governing, declining resources and emotional disinterest will limit our church foot print to the back our corporate heel. What is emerging is and will be new entities of people who are already finding their eternal refreshment in the incarnational and sacramental essence of the Book of Common Prayer tradition rehearsed in new forms and configurations whose view will be that of abundance, audacity and hope. They will not need COM’s or a House of Bishops. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs When religion and spirituality collide By Diana Butler BassPosted Apr 18, 2012 center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events April 19, 2012 at 3:13 pm I should state that the opinions expressed are my own and not those of the Community of St. Aidan or the Canon Communities of St. Benedict nor am I advocating that people leave the church!Blessings Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 18, 2012 at 6:13 pm Amen! A new thing is, indeed, happening on the streets…where young people, poor people, homeless people, politically engaged people are showing us how to be church. If we listen and respond, we might yet recover an old faith…the powerful itinerant faith of Acts. Comments (9) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ethel Ware Carter says: April 20, 2012 at 11:24 am John, thank you, really helpful. As Henri Nouwen stated many years ago, fear may be the original sin. And fear atomized spreads like a volatile cloud disintegrating association, affection and community. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Christopher L. Webber says: Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA April 18, 2012 at 6:12 pm Spot on , Dear Ms. Bass !!! Brava ! I’m certain Christ Himself would smile, and nod in agreement ! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img
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Compleat Angler fundraising software now available for free

first_imgCompleat Angler fundraising software now available for free American software company Schoolbench.com is now giving away its fundraising database.The Compleat Angler is now being offered free of charge to non-profit organisations. The software has been developed over five years.Users with MS2000 can download a copy from the company’s Web site. If you don’t have MS2000 then you can order the CD at cost ($8.95) also through their Web site. Users have to register each copy but there is no charge to do this. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  13 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Howard Lake | 18 September 2002 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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The Good Seed Still Available at Beck’s

first_img Facebook Twitter The Good Seed Still Available at Beck’s SHARE Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Mar 5, 2013 Plenty of good seed available at BecksAs Indiana corn and soybean planting time inches closer, is there enough high quality seed still available to fill the needs a grower has? Apparently it depends on who you ask. In Florida last week for Commodity Classic Scott Beck of Beck’s Hybrids was happy to tell farmers his company has the seed they want if their orders aren’t yet complete.“In terms of seed supply we’re sitting pretty good. We have our top selling hybrids still available and those are refuge in the bag products. One of those happens to be the AquaMax for drought tolerance, so we’re excited about what we can provide growers this late in the game in terms of seed supply. We’ve heard some rumblings about some farmers getting information now that they won’t be getting the variety they ordered or going to a secondary type of product from their supplier. I’m happy to say that we’ve got a good supply.”Beck said the existing supply is good news given their increase in corn seed sales this year of over 15 percent.Beck’s We Care for Orphans Adoption Fund Sweepstakes grand prize car made its final appearance last week at Commodity Classic.“We were able to get the number 1 car out of 100 of this new Camaro Panther which is kind of a revived brand name which was initially introduced back in the 60’s but then they pulled it off the market and just went with the name Camaro. Right now we’re approaching $100,000 raised for that charity which helps to financially support families that are going through the adoption process.”In an exciting month of May for Beck’s, the winner will be chosen on the 13th, “but we won’t announce it until race day. The Indy 500 will be the location where we’ll have a big splash with announcing the winner and that will be a very festive event and bring a lot of spotlight to the winner as well as the We Care for Orphans Adoption Fund.”And will race fans see the beautiful black 600 horse power Beck’s Panther Camaro on the Indy 500 track race day? Scott Beck says they’re working to make that happen.Hear more in the full HAT interview:Scott Beck at 2013 Com Classic Home Indiana Agriculture News The Good Seed Still Available at Beck’s SHARE Previous articleASA Delegates Establish Policy ResolutionsNext articleSeed Consultant 3/6/2013 Evening Comment with Gary Wilhemy Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Image Magazine: Winter 2020/2021

first_imgImage Magazine: Spring 2021 Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Sustainability is the new green: Fashion companies work towards environmentally-conscious practices Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Twitter Twitter Cowgirl: A look at the most glamorous women in rodeo Chloe McAuliffe Image Magazine: Spring 2021 Linkedin Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Facebook Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ + posts Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting Previous articlePantone: Color of the year 2020Next articleHoroscope: February 1, 2021 Haeven Gibbons and Chloe McAuliffe printLoading 50%Editor’s LetterThe TeamTable of ContentsEditor BiosEDITOR’S LETTERIt’s safe to say this issue of Image has been long awaited. When I traveled to Santa Fe about a year ago to cover ‘Tribe to Trade’ for this issue, I was just a writer for the publication. A lot has changed since then. We can’t travel to do shoots, Zoom is our new “newsroom,” the intimacy of a photo shoot has been forgotten as six feet divide the photographer from the models and gone are the days of a printed magazine. Welcome to Image – the digital one. Designers, writers and photographers were challenged on new levels to produce a fully digital magazine amid a pandemic. They exceeded expectations to say the least – thank you. That trip to Santa Fe in January of 2020 was one of the last trips I’d take that year, and shortly after, the publication of Image would be put on hold – along with the rest of the world. I had rushed to finish my piece for the Spring 2020 issue. I turned it in right before spring break and expected to see my story in print once I came back from vacation. But we never went back to campus that semester, and the magazine’s publication date was pushed back – indefinitely. It was the middle of the summer when I got a call from Kate Redfield, Image magazine’s previous editor-in-chief. She had graduated in the spring and needed someone to take over the magazine – to finish the spring issue and start the next. Months into working on completing stories from and adding stories to the Spring 2020 issue, Chloe and I met in person for the first time at the shoot for ‘Role Call.’ To say this was unconventional is an understatement. All of our prior meetings had been virtual. Nonetheless, four months later, we turned a spring issue into a winter one. This issue became something we could have never foreseen. It captures life before and during the pandemic. In stories like ‘Tribe to Trade’ and ‘Oscar’s Girls’ you’ll see the time when travel was easier and dream internships weren’t canceled or remote. But you will also see the boom of creativity on social media in ‘Medial Moguls’ and the push to break boundaries in ‘Role Call.’ It’s the ‘20s, and we’ve got a long way to go and a lot to live up to.  See you in the spring,TCU Student MediaHaeven Gibbons: Editor-in-ChiefChloe McAuliffe: Creative Director & Design EditorMcKenna Weil: Head Photographer & Social Media ManagerJessica Lynch: Digital CreatorJean Brown: Director of Student MediaTable of ContentsPantone is an in-depth, opinion piece about the meaning behind ‘Classic Blue,’ Pantone Color Institute’s color of the year 2020. We caught up with the vice president of the Pantone Color Institute, Laurie Pressman, to learn why this timeless shade was chosen to represent such an unprecedented year.Think Charlie’s Angels but make it fashion. Oscar’s Girls tells the story of how three TCU students landed an internship with the coveted Oscar De La Renta. Learn about their experiences, tips and future ambitions.We traveled to Santa Fe, New Mexico to sit down with some of the most experienced jewelry artisans in the nation. Members of the Santo Domingo Pueblo and Navajo tribe told us about their daily life as artisans, the jewelry making process and the meanings behind the cultural symbols they incorporate into their jewelry. For these artisans, jewelry making is a significant part of their inveterate customs, livelihood and legacy. How can you define a decade without acknowledging the fashion trends that went along with it? You can’t! This read looks back at the best looks of the decade, from athleisure and fanny packs, to puffer jackets and mini bags, you won’t want to miss this roundup.A musical theatre major and freelance model turned creative director, uses his talents to curate positive change. D’Mariel Jones tells his story. The 1920’s was the decade women put on the ritz. Their clothing reflected the social movement of the time. TCU fashion merchandising students organized a display to showcase the fur coats, sequins, fringe and elaborate accessories that became the iconic pieces of the ’20s.We’ve come full circle. At the beginning of 2010, Instagram wasn’t even a thing. Now, people can make a living from their phones via Instagram and other social media platforms. Welcome to the age of influence. Three influencers in the world of social media shared an exclusive look at the ‘behind the scenes’ of their job with us. See for yourself- there’s a lot that goes on behind that perfectly edited photo. Haeven Gibbons is the Editor-in-Chief of Image Magazine. She is also a reporter and line editor for TCU360. Haeven is currently working toward a BA in journalism with a minor in Spanish at Texas Christian University. She loves learning about other people, issues and cultures. Chloe McAuliffe is the Creative Director and Design Editor for Image Magazine. She is a junior at Texas Christian University, double majoring in strategic communication and design studies. Chloe is looking to pursue a career in fashion.  TopBuilt with Shorthand RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin Return of the disco: Latest fashion trends mirror the 1970s Facebook Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store ReddIt Image magazineImage Magazine: Winter 2020/2021By Haeven Gibbons and Chloe McAuliffe – February 1, 2021 1331 Haeven Gibbons This author does not have any more posts. last_img read more

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Professor combines creativity, instruction

first_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 22, 2021 Twitter Facebook Pinterest TAGS  Pinterest Odessa College’s visual art professor Dan Sorensen, center, gives feed back to his student Nayeli Bracamontes during painting class Tuesday in Sedate Hall. Sorensen has been the visual arts professor at Odessa College for the past seven years and recently named to the Texas Association of Schools of Art board in 2020. Sorensen obtained his master’s degree in painting and drawing from the University of Idaho. Dan Sorensen has always enjoyed creating art, especially drawing and painting with oils. A visual arts professor at Odessa College for the past seven years, Sorensen helps students get the most out of their work. “I was very interested in drawing, especially mostly because I have an older brother who was he was older than me and therefore better at just about everything. He could run faster than I could; do math and read. The only thing I could beat him at was drawing. That became kind of my thing,” Sorensen said. He grew up in Orem, Utah, and went to college at Brigham Young University-Idaho where he earned a bachelor’s degree in two-dimensional studio art, and a master’s from the University of Idaho in painting and drawing. Sorensen said he had a job offer from another college in East Texas and was planning to go there. “But I came here and I interviewed and met some people here on campus, interviewed with (President) Dr. (Gregory) Williams and I was just really impressed with the administration and the faculty here and kind of changed my mind and decided to come here instead of going to the other school in East Texas,” Sorensen said. Portraits are what Sorensen enjoys painting and drawing the most. His favorite mediums are oil paints with charcoal coming in a close second. “I like the challenge of drawing people,” he said. When you draw a landscape or still life, no one is really going to know if it’s right or if there are any problems with it. “But if you’re drawing a portrait, you have to get it just exactly right otherwise it won’t ever look right and everybody will know. I like the challenge of that. I enjoy being able to do the difficult subject matters. I teach art appreciation and I teach the painting and drawing classes. So I have Painting 1 and 2 and after that I have a Life Drawing class. In the fall, I’ll teach Drawing 1,” Sorensen said. Drawing 1 starts with perspective and understanding the way the world changes based on your position in space. “Then we talk about shading. We talk about just different techniques … different materials for drawing,” he said. The pandemic hasn’t really changed the way he teaches very much. “One thing that’s nice about art is that we’re always having to adapt to different situations. I feel like it’s almost easier for us to adapt because we’re used to adapting. So we just we spread out. We try to stay six feet apart. Fortunately, I’ve got space here where that’s not too much of a problem,” Sorensen said, referring to his class at Sedate Hall. Sorensen added that his students have been “awesome” about the adjustments and everyone has been willing to do what’s necessary. “It hasn’t been easy necessarily, but it hasn’t been nearly as challenging as what I thought it was going to be,” he said. Used to being around mountains, Sorensen said it was an adjustment moving here for him and his wife, Katie. The couple has four children. “Being in this job, I can travel during the summer so of course we always just go where there are mountains and trees. It’s been a good experience for us,” he said. He’s found that he enjoys teaching, although he still creates his own art. “One thing that’s a huge advantage for me as an artist is there’s a lot of time just being alone, just working on the canvas or the paper; just being completely isolated, so I like being able to have people to interact with. I don’t like being completely isolated all the time. Sure that’s necessary for some of it, but I like to be able to interact with people that are doing the same thing that I’m doing. And also when I’m teaching I’m actually also learning,” Sorensen said. When he offers pointers to students, he can figure things out in his own work. He said artwork goes back and forth between relaxing and not. To get better, you have to try something new so he may do a “bad” painting followed by a better one. The main thing he likes about oil painting is he doesn’t have to wait. “… If I’m painting in acrylic, then you’re waiting for layers to dry. You paint a layer, then you wait for it to dry; then you paint another layer and wait for it to dry. With oil painting, it dries so slowly that you don’t wait for the layers to dry. You just paint and then you paint into the wet paint and then you paint into the wet paint and you keep doing that … so you never have to wait. …,” he said. “I love doing that because it’s just so enjoyable to be able to put something down and then work into it. It’s just so forgiving. With acrylic, you have to paint over it and I feel like I’m starting over.” Students Nathaniel Jordan and Kate Mahoney say they are enjoying the classes they’ve taken with Sorensen. Jordan even changed his major as a result. He would pass by classes of Sorensen’s and art instructor Daiken Asakawa’s and saw some of the students’ work. Sorensen also had his paintings out. Asakawa teaches ceramics. “… I’ve always loved art. I love making things, so I decided I would try it out and actually try his class and see what it was like and I actually ended up changing my major to an art major because I loved it so much,” Jordan said. He was into art when he was younger, but was more focused on making money and “being a productive adult” when he got older, so he let art go. “He (Sorensen) really reinvigorated my passion for it. He’s got this quiet confidence that teaches you and shows you how to really bring out the creativity and the perfectionism …,” Jordan said. Mahoney said Sorensen’s classes are very well organized. She has taken several art and photography classes at OC. “He does a great job of encouraging you; helping you to correct mistakes before you’ve gone too far and you’re almost done. Sometimes somebody just showing you how to move one line can make everything fall into place,” Mahoney said. Sorensen was recently named a board member of the Texas Association of Schools of Art. Its website says TASA has been a forum for art department faculty members at two-year and four-year public and private higher education institutions to discuss trends and issues in art and academia. Sorenson was named to the TASA board in 2020 and his term ends in 2023, the site said. Facebookcenter_img SportsCollegeLocal NewsEducation Professor combines creativity, instruction Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleHUBUC Teams up With IDEMIA to Provide Dynamic CVV MOTION CODE™ Card to Help Fight FraudNext articleUS coronavirus death toll approaches milestone of 500,000 Digital AIM Web Support WhatsApplast_img read more

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Utah State Hires Weber State AD Jerry Bovee

first_imgHe began his career at Utah State, working as a sales and promotion specialist in the athletic department and later as assistant athletics director for marketing and promotions. Bovee also served as an assistant director for the Utah High School Activities Association in between his stints at Utah State and Weber State. During his time at Weber State, the Wildcats captured 19 conference championships, including Big Sky titles for the men’s basketball team in 2010, 2014 and 2016. The Wildcats also made the NCAA Tournament twice in Bovee’s tenure. He and his wife, Julie, have four children, Jared, Ethan, Addison and Seth. Brad James Tags: Ben Lomond High School/Big Sky/Jerry Bovee/John Hartwell/NCAA Tournament/UHSAA/USU Athletics/Weber State Bovee will officially begin his new assignment in June. Bovee, a 1992 graduate of Utah State in business finance had spent the last 10 years at Weber State.center_img Bovee is an Ogden native and graduate of Ben Lomond High School. In this position, Bovee will be second in command in the USU athletics department, overseeing all external functions. This includes direct sport supervision. Bovee earned his Master’s degree from Weber State in business administration in 2010. Written by April 23, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah State Hires Weber State AD Jerry Bovee FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Tuesday, Utah State University president and director of athletics John Hartwell announced the hiring of current Weber State director of athletics Jerry Bovee as assistant vice president and deputy athletics director for external affairs.last_img read more

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Former US Olympic equestrian team coach banned for life over sex assault allegations

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailquentinjlang/iStock(NEW YORK) — Former U.S. Olympic equestrian coach George Morris has been hit with a lifetime ban from the U.S. Equestrian Federation after an investigation found credible allegations of sexual misconduct involving a minor, according to officials.The lifetime ban was issued by the U.S. Center for SafeSports on Monday, making the 81-year-old Morris permanently ineligible to participate in any U.S. equestrian events, according to the organization’s website.SafeSport was launched in 2017 by the U.S. Olympic Committee as an independent investigative body dedicated to protecting athletes’ safety.“The Center investigated the allegations against Morris, found them credible, issued their ruling, and banned Morris for life,” the U.S. Equestrian Federation said in a statement released on Tuesday. “U.S. Equestrian and its affiliates will enforce this ban, which is subject to appeal.”Details of the allegations made against Morris were not made public.Morris’ ban was first reported Tuesday by The New York Times.Morris released a statement on Tuesday denying the sexual misconduct allegations and saying that he will appeal the ban. He said the allegations made against him date back more than 50 years.“I am deeply troubled by the U.S. Center for SafeSport’s findings regarding unsubstantiated charges for events that allegedly occurred between 1968 and 1972,” Morris said in a statement. “I contest these findings wholeheartedly and am in the process of disputing them.”“I share our community’s commitment to protecting the safety and wellbeing of all our athletes who need reliable guidance and encouragement at every level, of which I have provided for over 50 years,” he continued. “I will continue, as I always have, to proudly support equestrianism and its continued development around the world.”As an equestrian athlete, Morris won a silver medal in show jumping for the United States at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome and went on to become a renowned coach and trainer in the sport.He coached the U.S. Olympic equestrian team at the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, leading the team to three medals, including gold in team jumping. In 2016, Morris coached the Brazilian Olympic equestrian team at the Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. August 7, 2019 /Sports News – National Former US Olympic equestrian team coach banned for life over sex assault allegations Written bycenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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OUSU damns rent

first_imgUS Republican presidential candidate Jimmy McMillan has expressed a willingness to be involved with OUSU’s “Rent Is Too Damn High” campaign.OUSU told Cherwell that the politician, who came to prominence through his own “Rent Is Too Damn High” campaign in New York, has voiced an interest in supporting them.McMillan has unsuccessfully run several times for Governor and Mayor of New York .OUSU’s campaign aims to build a consensus that studying at Oxford must be affordable, that colleges are not businesses, and that students are not an income stream.This follows a vote taken at last week’s OUSU council meeting, which called for all colleges to maintain current rent levels for the coming academic year.OUSU is also seeking to raise awareness that many colleges “plough through huge rent hikes with virtually no consultation”.As part of the new campaign, OUSU is looking for examples of both the best and worst value college rooms.OUSU President David Barclay has  therefore urged students to get in contact with a photo and explanation of their situation.A recent email stated, “If you’re paying peanuts for a massive pad, or paying through the nose for a box, we want to hear from you!” Having won the support of McMillan, OUSU are currently trying to contact Ed Miliband, who was previously OUSU Rent and Accommodation Officer, and supported the Corpus Christi rent campaign last year, where a 15% rise in rent has occurred over the last three years.last_img read more

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Bay Avenue Construction Update

first_imgConstruction work will cause detours on Bay Avenue. The Cape May County Municipal Utilities Authority is replacing and rehabilitating the force mains that carry wastewater to the treatment plant on the bay at 45th Street. The work will be done on 31st Street from Haven Avenue to Bay Avenue and on Bay Avenue from 31st Street to Eighth Street.Work for March 16-20:The contractor has installed PVC pipe, backfilled and temporarily paved from the southern terminus of the project on 31st Street going northward to midway between 13th Street and 12th Street, and from the northern terminus of the project near Eighth Street, going southward to the south side of Ninth Street. Starting Monday, the contractor’s south crew will be progressing with work going northward toward 12th Street. The contractor’s north crew will be progressing southward toward 10th Street.Traffic:31st Street is closed to traffic between Simpson and Haven avenues.Next week, Bay Avenue will be open to local traffic only from 14th Street to Ninth Street.See full project updatelast_img read more

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For Movember, a professor shaves his ’stache

first_img Read Full Story A group of men in Harvard’s medical community are growing mustaches in November to raise awareness and money for men’s health, particularly prostate and testicular cancer, as part of an international effort called “Movember.”Harvard School of Public Health’s Meir Stampfer, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, took the opposite tack — he shaved his 40-year-old mustache to boost the fundraising effort of the Harvard Movember team. In an Oct. 27 Harvard Crimson article, Stampfer called his mustache “part of my identity” but said he was ready to shave it off if it would help stimulate interest in prostate cancer research. Stampfer has been a leading author of studies on prostate, colon, and breast cancer.The Harvard team reached its goal of raising $40,000 even before November began — and Stampfer followed through with a public shave on Oct. 30.last_img read more

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