5 children of missing Connecticut mom Jennifer Dulos are ‘healthy and well,’ family says

first_imgNew Canaan Police Department(NEW CANAAN, Conn.) — The five children of missing Connecticut mom Jennifer Dulos are “healthy and well” in the wake of her disappearance six months ago, according to a family statement.Jennifer Dulos, 50, disappeared on May 24 and was last heard from while dropping her children off at school in New Canaan. Her black Chevrolet Suburban was located near Waveny Park in New Canaan later that day, according to police.However, the family is counting their blessings as the Thanksgiving holiday approaches, “in spite of this tragedy,” family spokeswoman Carrie Luft said in a statement.“We give thanks that Jennifer’s children are healthy and well. We give thanks that they share their mother’s deep sense of empathy and curiosity about the world around them,” the statement read. “And, as ever, we are deeply thankful to the New Canaan and Connecticut State police for their ongoing efforts to solve this case and bring those responsible to justice.”The family is encouraging “acts of caring and generosity this holiday season” in Jennifer Dulos’ honor, including donating to a local food bank or shelter “or other gestures of compassion.”“Hug your loved ones close and extend a hand to a stranger,” the statement read.The body of Jennifer Dulos has not been found, despite investigators announcing that they believe she suffered a “serious physical assault” in the garage of her home, where bloodstains and blood spatter were found.Jennifer Dulos and her estranged husband, Fotis Dulos, were in a custody battle and a contentious separation that began in 2017 when she vanished.Fotis Dulos and his then-girlfriend, Michelle Troconis, were arrested in June and charged with tampering with or fabricating physical evidence and hindering prosecution after police accused them of driving to multiple locations to dump trash bags containing bloody clothes. They both pleaded not guilty to the charge.In September, Fotis Dulos and Troconis were slapped with a second charge of tampering with evidence in September, in which they pleaded not guilty again.In late October, the Hartford Courant reported that Troconis moved her belongings out of the home in Farmington, Connecticut, that she shared with Fotis Dulos.Jennifer Dulos’ mother, Gloria Farber, has custody of the Dulos’ five children.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 1/1/19

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) —   Here are the scores from yesterday’s sports events:      NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Final  Toronto       122  Utah           116 Final  Milwaukee     121  Detroit         98 Final  Denver        115  N-Y Knicks     108 Final OT  Portland      113  Sacramento     108 Final  Philadelphia  119  L.A. Clippers  113      NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Final  Boston      4  Chicago        2 Final  Nashville   4  Philadelphia   0 Final  Vegas       2  L.A. Kings     0   TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALL Final  (9) Florida St.      87  Winthrop         76 Final  (10) Virginia Tech   81  Notre Dame       66 Final  St. John’s           89  (16) Marquette   69Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by January 2, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 1/1/19center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Press release: UK Government tackles heart disease with new partnership

first_img This deal is a strong vote of confidence in our world-leading life sciences sector that enables all high-risk ASCVD NHS patients to benefit from this potentially gamechanging treatment. I am committed to helping the NHS reach its full potential, and innovative collaborations such as this puts patients at the forefront of the most promising medical breakthroughs. Unique collaboration to explore large-scale primary prevention trial leveraging NHS infrastructure and digital capabilities, making it faster and more accessible for patients The UK Government has announced its intent to pursue an innovative new collaboration with pharmaceutical company Novartis aimed at tackling the major world health challenge of cardiovascular disease, as well as bringing meaningful investment to the UK’s world-class life sciences sector. The current Memorandums of Understanding (MOU), which form the basis of the proposal, were negotiated and signed by The Medicines Company prior to its acquisition by Novartis.Cardiovascular disease is the world’s biggest killer, as well as the second biggest cause of death in the UK with over three million people suffering from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.The investigational drug inclisiran is currently in Phase III development for secondary prevention patients with expected European Medicines Agency (EMA) regulatory filing in Q1 2020. Upon approval and NICE assessment, the intent is to provide inclisiran through a population-level agreement. Providing inclisiran to this high-risk population could make a significant contribution towards meeting the NHS long-term commitment to preventing 150,000 cardiovascular deaths over 10 years.In primary prevention patients, the proposal is for inclisiran to be given in a large-scale NHS clinical trial that will be the first in the world to treat such a patient population, evaluating a game-changing approach to reducing the risk of heart disease at population-level numbers of patients.UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: UK positioned as a world-leading destination to develop similar, cutting-edge treatments for the rest of the world Aims to bring first-in-class cholesterol lowering drug to the UK and made available in a world-first innovative model for a large at-risk NHS patient population Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan said:center_img Novartis has a unique opportunity with inclisiran to open up a new chapter in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, the world’s leading cause of mortality and disability. We’re confident that innovative approaches like this will enable us to accelerate access timelines, deliver on our broader commitment to generating leading scientific evidence, and ensure continuous improvement in manufacturing efficiency and optimization. The unique population health model used by the UK will enable the collaboration to address the needs of patients and health systems that have previously not been able to be met on a large scale. The new cost-effective process will lead the way for innovative approaches to help meet large-scale, population health concerns.This highlights the UK as a prime destination to get new medicines to patients faster and more cost-effectively. Its appetite for innovation, unrivalled infrastructure and world-leading joined-up healthcare system enables the opportunity for similar deals to be done for other drug development projects of this scale.The UK plans to remain at the forefront of the global life sciences industry, giving our NHS and patients faster access to innovative medicines while supporting the growth of the sector.Notes to EditorAbout ASCVDAtherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. ASCVD results from a thickening and loss of elasticity in the arterial wall. It is a severe disorder and the leading cause of morbidity (sickness) and mortality (death) in most developed countries. High levels of LDL cholesterol build up on the walls of blood vessels.This buildup is called “plaque.” As blood vessels build up plaque over time, the insides of thevessels narrow. This narrowing blocks blood flow to and from the heart and other organsand eventually causes heart disease or stroke.About inclisiranInclisiran, potentially the first and only cholesterol-lowering therapy in the siRNA (smallinterfering RNA) class, is an investigational twice-yearly therapy in Phase III clinical development. As a siRNA, inclisiran harnesses the body’s natural process of RNA interference to specifically prevent production of the PCSK9 protein in the liver, which enhances the liver’s ability to remove LDL-C from the bloodstream, thereby lowering LDL-Clevels. Inclisiran is not yet approved by the FDA or any other regulatory authority. This innovative and ground breaking collaboration could transform the health outlook of tens of thousands of people suffering from heart disease, by bringing together in a unique combination our ability to organise large scale clinical trials, to address highly complex manufacturing issues, and to reach a large population ofpatients. It is a great illustration of how the UK Life Sciences Strategy can help both NHS patients and the wider economy, and shows that the UK can be the centre of a dynamic life sciences eco system whilst delivering great care. The collaboration proposal also includes the creation of an industry and academic consortium to improve the efficiency in which the UK can manufacture for this type of innovative medicine.Lord Prior, chair of NHS England, said:last_img read more

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A maestro and a wordsmith

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.It’s often been said that the Harvard undergraduate experience is what one makes of it. Senior Matt Aucoin took that message to heart. He leaves campus having immersed himself in Harvard’s rich worlds of poetry and music, with a degree in English, a passion for writing and composing, and a future destined for The New Yorker, or the conductor’s podium, or both.A resident of Kirkland House, Aucoin was poetry editor of the literary journal The Harvard Advocate. His thesis, a collection of poetry titled “Aftermusic,” recently won a Thomas T. Hoopes Prize for outstanding scholarly work or research. In 2009, he received several coaching sessions with classical music legend James Levine, and he used a 2010 Artist Development Fellowship from Harvard’s Office for the Arts to study at the famed opera house La Scala in Milan. He also is the recipient of the 2012 Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts, which recognizes outstanding artistic talent.Aucoin’s mother is musical, his father is a writer, and there were always hundreds of books, and plenty of scores lying around the house. But his parents, he said, “never forced me into anything.”He was smitten with music the moment he banged on the keys of his grandparents battered, out-of-tune, upright piano at age 6. Soon, a composer was born.With composition, said Aucoin, “The thoughts aren’t always clear. It’s a kind of need. And for me, that need was awoken by Beethoven.” He recalled wandering his backyard after hearing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and wondering, “How could something this good have been created?”He composed his first piece, “a twangy sort of Americana thing,” shortly after, and soon fell in love with opera’s fusion of words and song, completing his first libretto and score at age 9. Years of intense study of the piano followed, but by the time he was a teenager he suffered “a crisis of faith” in classical music. He retreated, playing the keyboard with his indie-rock band Elephantom and studying jazz. The break reinvigorated his love of the classical canon and inspired him to look beyond the conservatory to a place where he could chart his own musical path.“It seemed I could make my own musical life [at Harvard] in a way I couldn’t anywhere else. I really loved that independent spirit,” he told the Gazette in February.While at Harvard, Aucoin blazed his own artistic trail. He wrote and directed two operas, including “Hart Crane,” based on the troubled American poet, which premiered at the Loeb Drama Center in April. He also coached and accompanied countless Harvard singers, and served as music director for the Dunster House Opera Society and as assistant conductor for the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra (HRO).“I think he is an unstoppable force of nature … beyond talented and gifted,” said HRO Director Federico Cortese. “He is a hypersensitive poet with amazing abilities and a voracious taste for music.”A classmate and fellow musician called Aucoin “the kind of person that really makes you glad you went to Harvard.”Aucoin said his introduction to poetry came later because “as a really young kid you are open to music in a way you are not open to nuances of language quite yet. To understand poetry, words need to have accumulated multiple shades of meaning for you.” He credits the creative energy of his peers at The Harvard Advocate and of his mentor, Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory Jorie Graham, for helping him to develop a “personal language in which you find your own rules.”Aucoin arrived for a recent morning interview with a mop of curly wet hair, en route to observe a rehearsal at the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the remainder of the day. This fall he will work at the Metropolitan Opera, study composition at the Juilliard School, and direct the new orchestra/opera company at the Peabody Essex Museum.It’s hard to imagine Aucoin, whose face doesn’t hold even the promise of a wrinkle, leading professional musicians, many of whom have been performing longer than he has been alive. But he sees the job as inspiring confidence in players and performers regardless of their age.“I think of it as being a lightning rod, not the hand of Zeus,” he said. “You have to be able to give an intensity back to the orchestra.”If his Harvard career is any indication, Aucoin will have intensity to spare.last_img read more

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Using Pesticides Wisely

first_imgA state program aimed at teaching farmers and other pesticide applicators how to properly apply pesticides continues to limit pesticide drift in Georgia.The educational training system, called “Using Pesticides Wisely,” was created by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture.UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper, who developed the training, credits Georgia farmers’ excellent teamwork and decision-making for the low number of pesticide drift complaints in Georgia in 2017.“We’ve surveyed over 3,000 people since the required classroom trainings began in 2015, and 99 percent of them have said the training has been worthwhile. Over 98 percent of them have said the training will help them improve on-target pesticide applications. That’s fulfilling for sure,” Culpepper said.Since trainings began, drift complaints to UGA Extension offices have been reduced by 68 percent. In 2017, there were more than 2,700 official investigations into auxin off-target deposition across 24 states; there were no reported cases in Georgia, he said.“While this year’s season is still ongoing, currently the number of official investigations into auxin off-target drift are remarkably low,” Culpepper said.UGA research has identified 15 factors that should be considered to successfully manage off-target pesticide movement, including the spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray speed. Understanding the influence of boom height and land terrain is also extremely important, and it’s paramount that pesticide applicators understand the sensitivity of plants near treated areas. This can help applicators determine where they should not apply a particular herbicide.All of these factors are highlighted during the trainings that educate Georgia farmers and other pesticide applicators, many of whom are experiencing this type of in-depth training for the first time.The classroom trainings were supplemented by a one-on-one training program that was established in 2017 to provide education in the field. UGA Extension agents visited with applicators to reinforce what they taught in the classroom.“The one-on-one trainings gave county agents another opportunity to train and educate growers and applicators about the numerous factors that affect drift. It was an opportunity to meet and form relationships with not only growers, but also the farm applicators, and hopefully help them avoid potentially bad drift situations down the road,” said Jeremy Kichler, Colquitt County Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent.Culpepper credits the program’s success to the support of UGA Extension Associate Dean Laura Perry Johnson.“Her support ultimately allowed Extension to commit an untold number of hours to the project over the last four years,” he said. “I don’t think there’s anywhere else where the county agents actually give the one-on-one applicator trainings like we do here in Georgia. That doesn’t happen without … an administrator who understands the value.”Georgia farmers grow more than 40 high-value vegetable and fruit crops that are highly susceptible to drift damage, especially when they’re produced near row crops like auxin-tolerant cotton and soybeans. Growing up on a family farm in North Carolina, Culpepper understands what’s at stake for farmers and the need for growers to be better stewards of resources.“When you’re helping an applicator or grower get better because they want to get better, there’s nothing more rewarding,” Culpepper said. “When it’s your best friend’s farm, your family’s farm, you’re around it day in and day out — then you have a reality check. That’s what keeps me focused. I know in our state that if you’re applying pesticides, you want to be successful making only on-target applications. It makes no sense why you wouldn’t.”For questions regarding pesticide drift or other agricultural-related matters, contact your local UGA county Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

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City of Burlington Releases Two Updated Publications

first_imgThe City of Burlington Community & Economic Development Office (CEDO) announces the release of the Chittenden County Resource Guide for Employers & Employees and the 2nd edition of the Guide to Doing Business in Burlington. The publication of both these guides is in coordination with Vermont’s Small Business Week. Both of these publications are invaluable tools for entrepreneurs, business owners, job seekers and employees in the greater Burlington area to find what they need to start a business, expand a business, find funding, meet other business owners, get training, organize labor unions and take advantage of the resources that Chittenden County offers the business community and it’s employees.The Chittenden County Resource Guide has been published since 1995. It includes non-profit organizations, educational organizations, and government offices. The Guide has been expanded from a 50-page directory to a 195-page guidebook to include many more organizations and more information about each resource, including photos and quotes from clients who have worked with each organization. The Guide is available for free through the CEDO office and on the web at www.cedoburlington.org(link is external).The Guide to Doing Business in Burlington, now in it’s 2nd edition, is a street smart guide geared to the small business looking to start, expand, or relocate in the Queen City. It includes sections and advice on financing, hiring, business plans, and navigating the city permitting process. Written by an experienced business owner, it provides a practical approach to navigating city permitting departments and offers helpful information on start-up issues.Mayor Peter Clavelle comments, “Small businesses and their employees are essential for a healthy community. We have a strong network of services to assist and support the business community and their workforce in the greater Burlington area. These publications are much-needed tools to connect people with the help and information they need to thrive.”Sarah Goodwin-Brown, owner of the soon-to-be opened Great Harvest Bread Co on Pine Street, says, “The Guide to Doing Business is amazingly comprehensive. It made the process of starting a business less intimidating by addressing all the essential considerations that any new business must face. It made us aware of the resources and people in Burlington who were not only willing to advise and inform us but also offer their encouragement and support for our venture. This guide served as the launch pad for our business.”The Chittenden County Resource Guide for Employers & Employees and the Guide to Doing Business in Burlington are produced by CEDO and sponsored by the Burlington Public Works, Burlington Electric Department, Burlington Free Press, Burlington Town Center, Chittenden Bank, John Davis & Associates, Certified Public Accountants, Lake Champlain Workforce Investment Board, Merritt and Merritt, Attorney’s at Law, Pomerleau Real Estate, ReproDigital, Vermont Department of Economic Development, Vermont Department of Employment & Training, Vermont Manufacturing Extension Center, Vermont Small Business Development Center and Vermont Technical College, Technology Extension Center. If you have any questions, contact CEDO at (802) 865-7144.last_img read more

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WBON Appoints member to the Vermont Commission on Women Advisory Council

first_imgWomen Business Owners Network (WBON) announces that Gloria Salvanelli will become the organizations new appointee to the Vermont Commission on Women Advisory Council.According to Meredith Martin Davis, WBON Executive Director, Gloria has a very strong passion for womens issues and will be a positive contributor to the Advisory Council. We are looking forward to having a member of WBON participate on the Advisory Council and contribute to the wonderful work that the Vermont Commission on Women does for women in our state.The Womens Business Owners Network (WBON) is an association of over 140 women business owners from Vermont and New Hampshire who support one another in the pursuit of business and personal success. WBON has monthly chapter meetings in Burlington, Brattleboro, the Upper Valley, Rutland, and Montpelier, as well as conferences and social events throughout the year.Gloria Salvanelli is a 22-year veteran of the marketing business, and owner of her own marketing firm, GCS Marketing. As a former Marketing Director for Deck House, Communications Manager for Vermont Castings, and Director of Account Services for Evergreen Direct, Gloria has planned, budgeted and bought local, regional, and national advertising in TV, radio, magazines, and newspapers. As Public Relations Manager with Serono Pharmaceuticals in Boston, Dow Chemical in Europe, and both Stratton Mountain and Sugarbush Resort in Vermont, Gloria placed articles with national papers such as The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal, The Burlington Free Press, Newsday and The New York Times. She has also had four segments with the NBC Today Show, along with segments on CNN, ESPN and CBS, to list a few. Gloria has also authored articles in national magazines in both Canada and the United States, nominated and included in Whos Who in American Women, and worked with sports legends such as Bobby Orr and Mike Eruzione for the U.S.O.C. Clients include VSO Waltz Night, Anthony Pollina and Creative Habitat. She has been a WBON member since 2003.For more information, go to www.wbon.org(link is external) or call 802-363-WBON.last_img read more

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The United States Announces $120,000 in Humanitarian Assistance and Additional Supplies for Storm Victims

first_imgBy U.S. Embassy Guatemala November 08, 2020 The United States Government will provide $120,000 in emergency humanitarian assistance and additional support to individuals currently living in temporary shelters due to the devastating effects of Tropical Depression Eta. This assistance will be provided to individuals living in the nine departments worst affected by this disaster (El Quiché, Petén, Izabal, Zacapa, Chiquimula, Alta Verapaz, Jutiapa, El Progreso, and Santa Rosa).“We regret the terrible loss of life and destruction caused by Tropical Depression Eta. The United States stands ready to assist the people of Guatemala. Using the authority granted to me by the government of the United States, I am announcing the release of funds to provide immediate humanitarian assistance for those Guatemalans most affected by this disaster,” said Ambassador Popp.The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) will provide $120,000 to international non-governmental organizations working in the impacted departments to provide humanitarian assistance including food aid, water, and hygiene kits.The U.S. Department of Defense will provide critical supplies to communities isolated by the impacts of the storm.The United States stands in solidarity with the people of Guatemala as they work to overcome this tragedy and rebuild their country. We send our condolences to those who have lost loved ones, and pledge our continued support for those affected by this disaster.last_img read more

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Niche market

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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WTA can weather revenue hit but no normalcy until 2022: CEO

first_img“And from a good news standpoint, our tournaments seem to be strong and stable as well, and are weathering it,” he said.”You never know where you might lose one. But it appears that most of our calendar will stay intact if obviously the conditions allow for sporting events to be held going forward.”China featured prominently in the provisional calendar for the remainder of 2020 with seven tournaments, including the $14 million season-ending WTA Finals in Shenzhen.With some 200,000 new COVID-19 cases being reported globally every day and international travel restrictions still in place, Simon said plans were changing on an hourly basis and visibility for the rest of the year remained clouded.”I don’t think that we will be back to what we used to take as ‘normalcy’ probably until 2022,” he said. “So we’re now also looking at how are we going to manage 2021, because I don’t think this goes away as of January.”There’s a tremendous amount of planning and scenarios going in as to what that year might look like.”But it is watching and monitoring and working with the health experts to get their opinions, and then try to put our plans in place as best as we can so that we can operate as efficiently and as healthy as we possibly can.”Topics : The WTA has a strategy in place to cope with the financial strain caused by the COVID-19 pandemic but chief executive Steve Simon thinks the elite women’s Tour will not return to any semblance of normality before 2022.The WTA, which has lost a big chunk of tournaments since the forced shutdown in early March, will finally resume after a five-month break with the Palermo Open from Aug. 3.All of its tournaments in China this year were cancelled on Friday after the country’s Sports Ministry said it would not host any international events this year apart from 2022 Winter Olympic trials. “The WTA is no different than any other business in this world and everybody’s been affected financially by this,” Simon told Reuters from the United States.”And we’ve been hit hard, just as many other companies have been as well. If we’re not operating and you’re losing 50 to 60% of your year, your financials and your revenues are going to drop significantly.”Do we have some big challenges financially? Absolutely. But we do have a strategy, we do have a plan in place that’s going to allow us to operate.”Simon, who took over as the CEO in 2015, said the plans would evolve over the remainder of the year but it has ensured that the body would survive the economic crisis.last_img read more

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