It’s volunteers that fuel Loaves and Fishes

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The VOICE of InspirationBy Don LindseyAbout two years ago Inspire, the church I belong to, made the decision to start a homeless ministry.  The main idea behind that was an obvious one.  We wanted to do anything we could to help those in our area that were in need.  Once we dug into the homeless situation in Apopka, we found that the needs we were looking to help with were overwhelming and decided to partner or work with the organizations in the surrounding area that were already providing services to those who need it.  I volunteered to be the research person of our ministry, I would search the internet, read articles, and follow up on anything I had heard about regarding the topic of homelessness.  It was during that process that I discovered a wonderful ministry called Loaves and Fishes.While our church was never able to work directly with this group, the information I gathered during my research process really spoke to me.  Loaves and Fishes is an organization that was created in 1984 by area churches that focused on combining the resources they had to help feed the residents of the community that were affected by two devastating freezes that saw the lowest recorded temperatures in the north and central Florida regions and wiped out much of the valued citrus crops that so many depended on.As the years passed, the organization has moved its mission towards providing necessities to less fortunate families and individuals.Every year Loaves and Fishes distributes 17,000 food boxes to 37,000 residents throughout an area that covers nine different zip codes.  Every month basic items such as toiletries, baby and household items are passed out to those seeking help.  What’s amazing to me about this is that Loaves and Fishes is not a government funded program.  The help that they provide comes from the donations provided by area businesses, churches, individuals, schools and other organizations.  This also means that since they are not a government funded group, they can bring the word of God to those willing to hear it and provide Bibles to those who may need or want one.  That fact stood out to me because from my own personal struggles, I’ve learned that the guidance and comfort one can receive from God truly makes an enormous difference in my mindset when I’m having difficulty navigating life.  So, while I am sure the lack of government funding hurts with what they could provide, it’s nice to know that they are providing a tool for folks that I believe is of the upmost importance when dealing with hardship.Another great aspect of this organization is its volunteers.  According to their monthly newsletter and website, Loaves and fishes has 135 volunteers who do everything from volunteering time for food drives, distribute food and other items, donating resources and a host of other things that keep the organization operational. The ways to volunteer or donate are listed on their website and include, holding a food drive, collecting toiletry and household items, and taking advantage of the BOGO (buy one get one) deals that you see at your favorite supermarkets and donating the item that you do not use to Loaves and Fishes.  For more about this organization and all the wonderful things that they do, please visit http://www.loavesandfishesapopka.com/The more I consider doing these types of columns (writing about area organizations who dish out love and kindness) the more I find myself inspired to do more positive things in my own life.  In my opinion, Loaves and Fishes is another one of those great groups that are making a mark on this world for the better.  I’m still looking for other ideas for future articles so please send your suggestions and any information that you may have on the organization to [email protected] Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children, and community. Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 One of my 2 favorite ministries. They do such a wonderful job in our community!! Michael Heaton November 5, 2017 at 10:51 am Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 1 COMMENT TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articleJust a man, a pen and his opinionNext articleThe culture of America through a sandwich Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Juan De Jongh takes on Springbok jersey wearing Terry Crews in a dance off

first_imgWednesday Oct 22, 2014 Juan De Jongh takes on Springbok jersey wearing Terry Crews in a dance off A video of Juan De Jongh taking on Terry Crews in a short dance off has gone viral of late, despite it taking place and being uploaded over a year ago. The original Youtube clip was actually submitted it to us earlier this morning, but it has also been ripped and re-uploaded on other facebook pages, resulting in thousands of views.If you don’t know who Crews is, he’s a former NFL player but also a well known actor, comedian and clearly, he knows how to move. De Jongh is known for his silky moves both on and off the pitch, but was put to shame on this occasion as Crews, who filled out a Springbok jersey nicely, dominated with his robot, much to the amusement of the other Bok squad members.Incidentally, De Jongh got a call up to the Barbarians squad yesterday, where he will be part of the team that take on Australia at Twickenham on November 1st. Coached by former All Black John Kirwan, the squad is dominated by Kiwis, but also features a few Pumas players, ‘Honey Badger’ Nick Cummins, Ali Kellock of Scotland, and Mahonri Schwalger of Samoa.Barbarians squad to face the Wallabies: Tim Nanai Williams (Chiefs), Joaquin Tuculet (Grenoble & Argentina), Patrick Osborne (Highlanders), Frank Halai (Blues & New Zealand), Juan de Jongh (Stormers & South Africa), Nick Cummins (Coca Cola West Red Sparks & Australia), Francis Saili (Blues & New Zealand), Colin Slade (Crusaders & New Zealand), Marnitz Boshoff (Golden Lions & South Africa), Tomas Cubelli (Belgrano Athletic Club & Argentina), Sarel Pretorius (Cheetahs), Fumiaki Tanaka (Highlanders & Japan), Coenie Oosthuizen (Cheetahs & South Africa), Matt Stevens (Sharks & England), Thomas du Toit (Sharks), Angus Ta’avao (Blues), James Parsons (Blues), Mahonri Schwalger (Chiefs & Samoa), Michael Rhodes (Stormers), Matias Alemanno (La Tablada & Argentina), Dominic Bird (Canterbury & New Zealand), Al Kellock (Glasgow & Scotland), Adam Thomson (Canon Eagles & New Zealand), Matt Todd (Crusaders & New Zealand), Steven Luatua (Blues & New Zealand), Heinrich Brussow (Cheetahs & South Africa), Jacques Botes (Sharks).Video credit: mrBernardMyburghADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Funnies , See it to Believe it Related Articles 29 WEEKS AGO WATCH: American reacts to brilliant Nigel… 29 WEEKS AGO Video of John Kirwan apologising while wearing… 29 WEEKS AGO Simon Zebo reveals how ‘absolute lunatic’… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: She Removes Her Wrinkles With This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Dortmannhof House / Sigurd Larsen

first_imgCopyAbout this officeSigurd LarsenOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationEssenOn FacebookGermanyPublished on April 24, 2020Cite: “Dortmannhof House / Sigurd Larsen” 24 Apr 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?德国乡村农舍改造,将音乐室安插进谷仓 / Sigurd Larsen是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream 2020 CopyHouses, Renovation•Essen, Germany Projects Dortmannhof House / Sigurd Larsen Germany ArchDaily Photographs Photographs:  Christian FlatscherArchitect In Charge:Dortmannhof HouseCity:EssenCountry:GermanyMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Christian FlatscherRecommended ProductsMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesRenders / 3D AnimationEnscape3D Real-Time Rendering SoftwareText description provided by the architects. The Dortmannhof is a typical eighteenth century Hallenhaus, a common construction style from the region around Essen in western Germany. In a Hallenhaus, the familial living area and barn were brought together under one roof in a compact structure which could be up to five stories tall.Save this picture!© Christian FlatscherThe current residents are not farmers however, but a family of musicians. To serve their needs, an eleven meter high music studio was added at the center of the three parallel barn spaces.Save this picture!ModelSave this picture!ModelAdditionally, a guest house with a separate entrance was constructed in the eastern barn, and a large additional bathroom to the western barn. Save this picture!© Christian FlatscherThe building’s new spaces grow tall and narrow like the surrounding crops. Large north-facing windows allow for additional daylight to stream through the old perforated walls which were originally meant to ventilate the hay. Save this picture!© Christian FlatscherThe historic building is comprised of several entrances and internal connections which allowed for various farming activities to occur simultaneously. These features have been retained, allowing family life, creativity and work to coexist in a similar spirit.Save this picture!© Christian FlatscherSave this picture!Ground Floor PlanSave this picture!© Christian FlatscherThe new internal additions to the house were constructed as oversized inhabitable furniture which can be removed to restore the building’s historical appearance. This approach was taken to meet requirements of the German law for monument protection, which allows for historic buildings to be adapted for modern usage.Save this picture!© Christian FlatscherProject gallerySee allShow lessComfort, Interaction and Efficiency: Artificial Intelligence in Architectural ProjectsArticlesWater Works, the Exhibition by WORKac at Musea Brugge Goes DigitalArchitecture News Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/938176/dortmannhof-house-sigurd-larsen Clipboardcenter_img “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/938176/dortmannhof-house-sigurd-larsen Clipboard Year:  Architects: Sigurd Larsen Area Area of this architecture project Area:  350 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Houses Dortmannhof House / Sigurd LarsenSave this projectSaveDortmannhof House / Sigurd LarsenSave this picture!© Christian Flatscher+ 39Curated by María Francisca González Share “COPY”last_img read more

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KaVontae Turpin wins third Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week

first_imgMen’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to Texas Twitter Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt Turpin returned a punt 90-yards to the end zone for a touchdown, bobbing and weaving his way through the Jayhawk punt coverage unit until he found some daylight. It equaled the second-longest in TCU history, and it was the third punt return touchdown of his career, tying him with Linzy Cole and Blanard Spearman for the most all-time by a Horned Frog.You’ll be seeing this #TurpinTime return a lot more we think! #SCTop10 #BeatKU pic.twitter.com/tADpMzdZnc— TCU Football (@TCUFootball) October 22, 2017“Every time he [Turpin] touches the ball I think he’s going to score, and whenever we give it to him, I sit back and watch because I know something amazing is about to happen,” TCU quarterback Kenny Hill said. “He backs it up with that punt return for a touchdown, and it’s unbelievable because I have never seen anything like that. I thought he was tackled at the four.”Turpin leads the conference and is seventh nationally with his 16.3-yard average on punt returns.It’s the third time in Turpin’s career he’s garnered Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week accolades. The junior is also TCU’s leading receiver this season with 23 catches.“You try to get him the ball as much as you can because you know he’s going to make something happen,” Hill said. Turpin had his second career punt return for a touchdown against Kansas the last time the Horned Frogs hosted the Jayhawks in 2015, reversing the entire field on a 49-yard sprint.TCU ‘s KaVontae Turpin (25) returns a punt for a touchdown against Kansas in the first quarter of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Ron Jenkins)He also had an 81-yard punt return for a touchdown in last year’s season opener against South Dakota State last, giving him two of the eight-longest in TCU history.TCU punt returner KaVontae Turpin (25) runs a punt in for a touchdown during the first half of an NCAA college football game against South Dakota State on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero)Turpin and No. 4 TCU return to action in Ames, Iowa against No. 25 Iowa State Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Twitter ReddIt Previous articleBrandon Victorian and Maddie Madill named Mr. and Ms. TCUNext articleTCU Rifle cruises to 4-0 start Garrett Podell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Garrett is a Journalism and Sports Broadcasting double major. He is the Managing Editor for TCU360, and his passions are God, family, friends, sports, and great food. Boschini: ‘None of the talk matters because Jamie Dixon is staying’ TCU wide receiver KaVontae Turpin returns a Kansas punt 90 yards for a touchdown Saturday in. a 43-0 victory over the Jayhawks. Photo courtesy of GoFrogs.com Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Linkedincenter_img Garrett Podell Facebook Listen: The Podell and Pickell Show with L.J. Collier Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ + posts Boschini talks: construction, parking, tuition, enrollment, DEI, a student trustee Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Linkedin World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution printTCU wide receiver and returner KaVontae Turpin won the Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week award for the third time in his career for his efforts in the return game Saturday in TCU’s 43-0 beatdown of Kansas.  The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive yearslast_img read more

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Vote for the Netizen of the Year!

first_img March 1, 2013 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Vote for the Netizen of the Year! RSF_en The nominees for the 2013 Netizen Prize are: Itsmania Pineda Platero (Honduras), Cheikh Fall (Senegal), Oumarou Mohamed Lamine (Mali), Suren Gazaryan (Russia), Murat Tungishbayev (Kazakhstan), Assen Yordanov (Bulgaria), Huynh Ngoc Chenh (Vietnam), Mosireen (Egypt) and Shiva Nazar Ahari (Iran).Download the list of nominees 2013 Since 2008, this prize has been awarded to journalists, bloggers and other netizens who have made a distinguished contribution to the defence of freedom of expression on the Internet. Organisation Related documents cp_netizen2013_ar-2.pdfPDF – 229.9 KB To support their efforts and to mark World Day Against Cyber-Censorship, Reporters Without Borders and Google award the Netizen Prize every 12 March with the aim of drawing the public’s attention to the need to defend online free expression. From today until 5 March, Internet users can vote for the nominee they think best represents the fight for online freedom of information by going to the Reporters Without Borders YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/netizen2013).center_img Nine netizens have been nominated by Reporters Without Borders. We have chosen online news and information providers who have distinguished themselves through investigative reporting, projects or other initiatives which have helped advance online freedom of information and which are likely to inspire fellow netizens around the world. The nominee who has received the most votes will be announced on 7 March. The winner will be invited to the award ceremony at Google France’s headquarters in Paris on 12 March. Read in Arabic (بالعربية)I vote online !Two billion people worldwide now have Internet access but a third of them lack access to an Internet that is free and open to all because of government censorship, filtering and online surveillance. Around 180 citizen-journalists, bloggers and other netizens are currently in prison because of their online activity. To stimulate online interest, the winner of the Netizen Prize will this year for the first time be elected by the Internet public, who are invited to cast their vote online. News Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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Caltech’s 83rd Annual Seminar Day Goes Virtual for First Time

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  105 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Science and Technology Caltech’s 83rd Annual Seminar Day Goes Virtual for First Time By CALTECH Published on Monday, May 25, 2020 | 11:26 am Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty10 Reasons Why Ultimatums Are Unhealthy For RelationshipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News More Cool Stuff Community News Make a commentcenter_img CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Azita Emami, Caltech’s Andrew and Peggy Cherng Professor of Electrical Engineering and Medical Engineering (top), and Katherine Bouman, Caltech assistant professor of computing and mathematical sciences and electrical engineering, describe their work on a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort to integrate sensors with artificial intelligence.More than 2,300 people participated in Caltech’s 83rd Annual Seminar Day on May 16 to hear Institute luminaries discuss a range of topics from COVID-19 and sensor technology to the robotic exploration of Mars and historical pandemics.Presented by the Caltech Alumni Association (CAA), this year’s event was the first to be offered virtually, with presenters and attendees interacting through the online teleconferencing service Zoom due to coronavirus restrictions on public events.“For 83 years, Caltech’s Seminar Day has been very popular among alumni,” says Ralph Amos, assistant vice president for alumni relations and executive director of the CAA. “Yes, hosting Seminar Day online was a completely new experience for everyone involved. Nonetheless, alumni and the global Caltech community set a new record of attendance to this signature engagement experience, encouraging us to further explore the benefits of virtual alumni engagement.”Los Angeles Times columnist Patt Morrison emceed the event, introducing the four presentations:• “SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic,” presented by virologist David Ho (BS ’74), Caltech Distinguished Alumnus, Caltech trustee, and director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, Columbia University• “Sensing to Intelligence: From the Human Body to Black Holes in Space,” presented by Katherine Bouman, Caltech assistant professor of computing and mathematical sciences and electrical engineering; and Azita Emami, Caltech’s Andrew and Peggy Cherng Professor of Electrical Engineering and Medical Engineering• “The Mars 2020 Mission and Robotic Exploration at JPL,” presented by Michael Watkins, Caltech vice president and director of JPL• “Pandemics and the Economy: Lessons from History,” presented by Jean-Laurent Rosenthal (PhD ’88), Caltech’s Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and Ronald and Maxine Linde Leadership Chair, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.Ho began the first lecture of the daylong series with a discussion of the origins and biology of the novel coronavirus and its effects on the human body. Describing the virus as a naturally occurring pathogen closely related to a strain found in bats, he noted it can wreak havoc not only on the lungs but also the heart and kidneys, triggering multi-organ failure: features that make it much more dangerous than the flu.He said that in the United States the infection rate has come down since its peak, but that it is still not under control, making relaxing social distancing restrictions fraught, and adding that with different hot spots dotting the country and the world, “there’s a very good chance that this pandemic will persist and become seasonal.”Vaccines, he said, are probably still 18 months away under the best circumstances. That said, worldwide, a “massive mobilization of science to address this pandemic,” to develop drugs, antibodies, and tests is now underway. “In my 30-plus years of research, I’ve never witnessed such a mobilization of scientists to address a single problem,” he said.Emami and Bouman discussed their work on the Sensing to Intelligence initiative, a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort that aims to integrate sensors with artificial intelligence to improve our ability to understand domains such as space and the human body.Bouman described how her work on computational imaging allows scientists “to take pictures of things that seem invisible to us on first glance.”For example, she noted that a standard camera cannot directly take a picture of a living brain inside the head, so science has turned to MRI scanners that amass indirect measurements and run them through an algorithm to create a suitable image. The same limitation also exists when studying space, she continued, describing how she was part of the Event Horizons Telescope team that used a similar approach to harness an array of international telescopes and process their data to reveal the first-ever image of a black hole.Emami briefly described her work on the creation of miniaturized implantable or wearable biomedical devices, such as intraocular pressure sensors for patients with glaucoma and injectable glucose sensors for patients with diabetes, before focusing her talk on work relating to neural interfaces.“This is a domain that can really benefit from a sensing-to-intelligence approach, given the fact that we are dealing with a huge amount of neural data sets,” she said.Emami also discussed work in the lab of Richard A. Andersen, James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience and director of the T&C Chen Brain-Machine Interface Center, in which sensors allow a paralyzed human subject to move a robotic arm through intentional thought. Because the current setup is bulky and necessarily constrained to clinical settings, Emami’s group aims to create an interface that can be “put under the skin and wirelessly communicate with this robotic arm, and allow the patient to move around freely and operate.”Setting up his presentation about the exploration of Mars, Watkins talked about the history of JPL, American rocket science, and space exploration, noting Caltech’s pivotal role in each: “Caltech and NASA DNA are intertwined, and I think that makes us great.”With each mission, he said, JPL “is given a very challenging problem. ‘Please do this thing that’s never been done before. We don’t know what to expect, [and] there’s a huge uncertainty involved.’ Most people would be terrified by that problem. I think those are the problems that we salivate over.”He said the Mars 2020 mission, which will launch in July 2020, intends to search for signs of life and sample materials from areas that might have been hospitable to life in the past with the hopes that these could be returned to Earth by a future mission.The Mars 2020 Perseverance rover is bristling with cameras, sensors, scientific equipment, and an advanced drill: tools designed to detect biosignatures. Watkins added that they were very challenging instruments to develop: “We joke with people, ‘It’s not only a super high-precision instrument that makes parts-per-billion-type measurements, it’s mounted onto the side of a jackhammer.’”Summing up, he said, “Mars 2020 is a pivotal mission in our search for life. It could finally answer the age-old question, ‘Are we alone?’”In the final presentation of the day, Rosenthal discussed the historical interplay between public health and economics during pandemics, with an eye toward lessons that might be valuable during the current COVID-19 outbreak.Rosenthal, who has studied the economic impact of the Parisian cholera epidemic of the 1830s, noted that, in pandemics, it is often the poor who suffer the most because they tend to live in more crowded homes and neighborhoods, and are consequently more likely to get infected. Additionally, they have fewer financial resources to draw on when their jobs are disrupted because of an outbreak.Rosenthal discussed the current and future economic disruption resulting from COVID-19, including job losses, decreased spending, decreased demand for goods and services, and whether or how the world’s governments and fiscal systems will be able to cope without dramatic changes.Factors that will affect how long the economy will take to recover will include how society chooses to pay for health care and the development of successful medical interventions to arrest the spread of the disease, he said. “The world of low taxes that we’ve been living in for a long time is going to have to end as a result of this.”View the videos of each session on the Seminar Day website. Subscribe STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Breakfast at Tiffanys

first_imgNewsBreakfast at TiffanysBy Bernie English – August 22, 2013 606 Lotsa luck for Limerick family Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Previous articleLimerick rental prices remain stableNext articleWorrying rise in domestic violence figures Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Three Wise Numbers Net €7,505 for Limerick Native Limerick Lotto winners pledge to use winnings to secure children’s future Linkedin WhatsApp Advertisement Facebook Print Twitter Email Happy New Year for online National Lottery player in Limerick who becomes Ireland’s newest millionaire NOTHING bad ever happens in Tiffany’s, according to Holly Golightly and a county Limerick woman is going to put that theory to the test. The lucky lady who scooped a €6.1 million fortune is also about to find out whether diamonds really are a girl’s best friend as she has declared she will be visiting Tiffany’s to buy some. The winner, who wants to remain anonymous, bought the €4 Quick Pick at Kennedy’s Centra in Lahinch on Friday last. The woman says she checked her numbers after hearing where the lucky ticket was purchased . Could you be Limerick’s latest millionaire? Are you the lucky Limerick winner of €8.5 million? RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSLottoTiffanys last_img read more

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Before and after – Eddie’s weekend in the floods

first_imgEmail Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Sent in by Eddie O’Doherty of his father. Thanks to Eddie O’Doherty for sending in this pic of his father on Oliver Plunkett Street over the weekend. Facebook Previous articleWay of the FightNext articleWin a pair of tickets to Munster v Cardiff in Thomond Park! Guest Writerhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisementcenter_img Print Linkedin NewsCommunityPhotosBefore and after – Eddie’s weekend in the floodsBy Guest Writer – February 3, 2014 796 Twitter WhatsApplast_img

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Pet vaccination clinic

first_img Facebook Facebook By admin – April 5, 2018 WhatsApp Local News Twitter Pet vaccination clinic City of Odessa meetings & eventsOPDThe Odessa Animal Shelter, 910 W. 42nd St., has scheduled a $30 Vaccination Clinic (cash only) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.Vaccinations include bordetella, rabies and DA2PPV and city/county license.All dogs must be leashed and cats must be in a carrier.Adoptions, vendors and more will be included.For more information, call 432-368-3527. Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Previous articleDon’t Mess with Texas Trash OffNext articleUTPB Philharmonic to perform Sunday adminlast_img read more

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Vaccinating Florida’s seniors at Miami’s largest hospital

first_imgLocal NewsUS News Twitter Vaccinating Florida’s seniors at Miami’s largest hospital Twitter Facebook Pinterest Previous articleSchakel, San Diego State roll past San Jose State 85-54Next articleChengdu During Spring Festival, a Beautiful City Full of Illuminations and Flowers Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 center_img Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest MIAMI (AP) — The tiny glass vaccine vials are delivered to Miami’s largest hospital and immediately whisked to a secret location, where they are placed inside a padlocked freezer with a digital thermometer that reads minus 76 degrees Celsius (minus 105 F). An armed guard watches outside the door. The pharmacy staff at Jackson Health System often gets short notice on how many doses are coming — sometimes as little as 24 hours. As soon as the doses arrive, the pressure builds to administer them quickly, but the timing is complicated. The staff can thaw out only as much COVID-19 vaccine as the hospital can administer that same day. The Associated Press was given exclusive access to a recent day of vaccinations at the system’s main hospital, offering a glance inside the hour-to-hour efforts that fuel the largest inoculation campaign in U.S. history. It is an anxious undertaking for both vaccine providers and Americans seeking the shots, and everyone has to watch the clock. Appointments must be handled carefully — without overbooking but also with confidence that those who are booked will show up — to ensure that the fewest possible doses go to waste. Once mixed, the vaccine is good for only six hours. “We don’t book any appointments until we know we’ve got the supply,” said David Zambrana, vice president of hospital operations. “We’re constantly checking the supply. You can feel the anxiety these folks have. We’ve heard people say, ‘You’ve saved my life’. They are coming with so much hope.” Alette Simmons-Jimenez is part of a WhatsApp text group with about 60 women who keep a hawkish watch as appointment slots open in Miami-Dade, where Jackson Memorial Hospital is helping in the effort to vaccinate 465,000 of the county’s most vulnerable seniors who are 65 and older — from shuts-ins to snowbirds. Someone alerted her on a recent evening that Jackson Memorial would offer an “extremely limited” number of slots starting at 8 a.m. the next day. Typically, 1,500 slots fill up in 15 minutes. Simmons-Jimenez, 68, was on her computer by 7:30 a.m., frequently refreshing her browser. She eventually snagged an appointment for herself and her husband for 12:30 p.m. “I think I’m the only one in my group that got an appointment,” she said. The Jackson system has distributed over 105,000 doses so far. It’s a massive lift, requiring roughly 275 staff at three locations, including parking attendants and security guards to guide patients in and out; medical and nursing students and firefighters and paramedics to give injections; and nurses to monitor patients after they receive the shots. The sites run seven days a week. The site at Jackson Memorial vaccinates about 60 people an hour. The hospital’s tech team created an app for appointments, but they are keenly aware that seniors are not always tech savvy. The hospital reached out to 55 churches, temples and mosques in the area trying to contact seniors in underserved communities and will soon partner with local homeless organizations. As demand for the vaccines outpaces supply, nearby hospitals are canceling appointments. Earlier this month, Baptist Health sent out a tweet canceling all appointments for Jan 20 and later and announcing that new appointments could not be booked. Both Simmons-Jimenez and her husband’s appointments had been canceled by another hospital, which told her the appointments would be rescheduled, but that was quickly rescinded. She told friends it seemed unlikely they would get vaccinated before summer. “I said, ‘So now we’re just left out in the dark,’” she said. “I was frustrated.” At Jackson Memorial, people start lining up outside the hospital by 7 am, 6 feet apart, most wearing double masks in an orderly, fast-moving line. Inside, workers hold laminated cards — green to signal an open seat and red to wait. The process moves quickly — most are vaccinated within 30 minutes. In a tiny, nondescript room off to the side, three pharmacy technicians sit at a long white table, sticking syringes into the vials and laying them on trays that are delivered to vaccination tables. A small refrigerator stands in the corner to hold defrosted vials. Each vial holds enough for five doses, sometimes six. The pharmacy techs mix vaccine based on the number of appointments to ensure nothing is wasted. As the end of the day nears, they mix fewer batches. “They are literally mixing right on the spot. In the last hour, between 4 and 5 p.m., we slow down. They’ll only bring out one tray of drawn syringes for the exact number of people in the room,” Zambrana said. The hospital is now required to report how much vaccine is discarded and so far, none has gone to waste, he said. Simmons-Jimenez and her husband sit down with a two-person team — someone to check them in and someone who administers the shot, typically a paramedic. After a quick prick, patients are given the coveted vaccination card. Within the week, they will get a text or email with the date for their second shot. When they stand up, someone immediately disinfects the seat and touch-screen pad with bleach wipes. Simmons-Jimenez marvels at the process. “It’s very well organized,” she said. “I was prepared to arrive today and for them to tell us to go away.” Patients must stay 10 to 30 minutes for observation, depending on underlying health issues. The key to avoiding mass cancellations is not opening slots too far in advance, and instead only opening up appointments 24 to 48 hours ahead of time — when the hospital is certain of the supply. Only 10 percent are no-shows. The hospital guarantees everyone who has been given a first shot will get the second booster shot — something that hospitals in other states have struggled with because of supply shortages. Irma Mesa, a 74-year-old grandmother, was shocked when she logged onto the website and got an appointment. “The first time,” squealed Mesa, who received her second dose. Mesa, who hasn’t seen her children or grandchildren since January 2020, even got a second appointment for her 80-year-old husband, Angel. Now the couple will consider whether they can safely see their grandkids. “I feel good, happy,” said Mesa, beaming and echoing the sentiments of many exiting the hospital corridors with fresh Band-Aids on their arms, proudly carrying new vaccination cards. “I’m relieved.” WhatsApp TAGS  last_img read more

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